Ford Motor Company - Is the Corporate decline inevitable?

I was unaware of this tidy looking "Endeavour" vehicle.

WIKI confirms it is a "body-on-chassis" device (similar in principle to the Discovery 3 and 4), with the body-shell dropped on top of the Ranger chassis. Apparantly, it is also (still ?), built/assembled in Australia, so mayb
e @bobthebuilder can add more information ?!


Published by AUTOCAR, on 9 September 2021.

Ford ends car production in India after 27 years

Underutilisation of factories prompts Ford to pull the plug on Indian production, with 4000 jobs affected.

Ford will wind down its production operations in India, 27 years after it became one of the first multinational car makers to enter the market.

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Photo: Endeavour is built alongside Ecosport at Maraimalai Nagar.

The American company announced today that manufacturing of vehicles for local sale will cease immediately. Export manufacturing will wind down at its Sanand plant by the final quarter of the year and the Chennai engine and vehicle plants will be closed by the second quarter of 2022.

However, Ford will continue to import niche-volume cars like the Mustang and Ranger – for local sale, and has announced that it will “significantly expand its 11,000-employee Business Solutions team in India in coming years to support Ford globally” . . .

. . . There are a variety of reasons for Ford pulling the plug on manufacturing operations at its Sanand and Maraimalai Nagar plants, but the key reason is that plant capacity utilisation has been unsustainably low.
Combined, the two facilities have a capacity of producing 4,00,000 units annually, but in recent times, Ford has only managed to produce 800,000 cars (20% of the capacity), with half of those being made for export.

Ford president and CEO Jim Farley said: “Despite investing significantly in India, Ford has accumulated more than $2 billion of operating losses over the past 10 years, and demand for new vehicles has been much weaker than forecast.”

Such low output figures, paired with the fact that the Sanand plant was originally built to meet Ford’s global standards, means that it has been too expensive to make cars for the Indian market profitably.

The Maraimalai Nagar facility did allow for more cost-effective manufacturing, but even sustaining this single plant, where the Ecosport and Endeavour – two of the brand’s most popular models – are made, isn’t financially viable. This is especially true in the context of Ford’s ageing Indian line-up, the low demand for its range and the lack of any new mass-market models on the horizon.

Ford will continue to have a presence in India and will increase its Business Solutions team, which supports the company's global operations with a focus on engineering, technology, and business operations.

The company also said that India will remain Ford’s second-largest salaried workforce globally and in addition to Ford Business Solutions, Ford India will continue engine manufacturing – until the second quarter of 2022 – for export.

However, about 4000 employees are expected to be affected by the developments and the company will work with the employees, unions and all stake holders to plan a fair settlement.

Ford has committed to support existing owners with service, aftermarket parts and warranty services. Dealers too will be operational, as the network will still exist to support the continued sale of imports. However, customer touchpoints may reduce, especially in smaller towns.

Going forward, Ford will mainly focus on importing niche models, like it does in Australia and Brazil. This means it could bring in models such as the Mustang, Bronco and Ranger (for which it already had an India launch plan).

While Ford will no longer use India as a manufacturing hub for exporting to other regions, it said it will continue to rely on India-based suppliers for parts for its global products.

In order to continue producing cars in our market, Ford’s only realistic option was to enter a collaboration or joint venture (JV) with another car maker in India. It even entered a JV with Mahindra & Mahindra, with the official announcement in October 2019, but that deal collapsed soon after on 31 December 2020.
Given that the JV was almost three years in the making, Ford had already structured many of its future plans around it. This backfired quite significantly for Ford, as without the JV, it had no new models for the near future, with its plants continuing to be underutilised.

 
I was unaware of this tidy looking "Endeavour" vehicle.

WIKI confirms it is a "body-on-chassis" device (similar in principle to the Discovery 3 and 4), with the body-shell dropped on top of the Ranger chassis. Apparantly, it is also (still ?), built/assembled in Australia, so mayb
e @bobthebuilder can add more information ?!


Published by AUTOCAR, on 9 September 2021.

Ford ends car production in India after 27 years

Underutilisation of factories prompts Ford to pull the plug on Indian production, with 4000 jobs affected.

Ford will wind down its production operations in India, 27 years after it became one of the first multinational car makers to enter the market.

View attachment 603908
Photo: Endeavour is built alongside Ecosport at Maraimalai Nagar.

The American company announced today that manufacturing of vehicles for local sale will cease immediately. Export manufacturing will wind down at its Sanand plant by the final quarter of the year and the Chennai engine and vehicle plants will be closed by the second quarter of 2022.

However, Ford will continue to import niche-volume cars like the Mustang and Ranger – for local sale, and has announced that it will “significantly expand its 11,000-employee Business Solutions team in India in coming years to support Ford globally” . . .



The Endeavour is sold here as the Everest. I mentioned it earlier, I think on the Defender thread. It’s quite a nice car, but bloody massive which is why it’s not sold in the UK. It dwarfs a new Defender 110, although they never look big here because there’s so many utes and Landcruisers here. Back seat comfort in the Everest is poor and typical of truck based SUVs; the floor is raised because it sits at what would be truck be level.

Ford closed its factory here in 2019. I don’t think the Everest / Endeavour (or, indeed the Ranger) was ever built here. IIRC they’re built in Thailand. They were designed here.
 
The Endeavour is sold here as the Everest. I mentioned it earlier, I think on the Defender thread. It’s quite a nice car, but bloody massive which is why it’s not sold in the UK. It dwarfs a new Defender 110, although they never look big here because there’s so many utes and Landcruisers here. Back seat comfort in the Everest is poor and typical of truck based SUVs; the floor is raised because it sits at what would be truck be level.

Ford closed its factory here in 2019. I don’t think the Everest / Endeavour (or, indeed the Ranger) was ever built here. IIRC they’re built in Thailand. They were designed here.
Thank you ;) .
 
I was unaware of this tidy looking "Endeavour" vehicle.

WIKI confirms it is a "body-on-chassis" device (similar in principle to the Discovery 3 and 4), with the body-shell dropped on top of the Ranger chassis. Apparantly, it is also (still ?), built/assembled in Australia, so mayb
e @bobthebuilder can add more information ?!


Published by AUTOCAR, on 9 September 2021.

Ford ends car production in India after 27 years

Underutilisation of factories prompts Ford to pull the plug on Indian production, with 4000 jobs affected.

Ford will wind down its production operations in India, 27 years after it became one of the first multinational car makers to enter the market.

View attachment 603908
Photo: Endeavour is built alongside Ecosport at Maraimalai Nagar.

The American company announced today that manufacturing of vehicles for local sale will cease immediately. Export manufacturing will wind down at its Sanand plant by the final quarter of the year and the Chennai engine and vehicle plants will be closed by the second quarter of 2022.

However, Ford will continue to import niche-volume cars like the Mustang and Ranger – for local sale, and has announced that it will “significantly expand its 11,000-employee Business Solutions team in India in coming years to support Ford globally” . . .



Similar with Indonesia, about 10 years ago Ford shut up shop and walked away leaving Everest/Endeavour owners high and dry. Meanwhile the Chinese and Korean manufacturers are flooding in to open plants, the Japanese are of course already long established.

Maybe I am wrong, but it seems to me that giving up on the fastest growing markets in the developing world isn't a strategy that is aimed at future world dominance. Perhaps Ford should have a look at the once globe-spanning British car industry to see what that path leads to.
 
An old boy about half a mile from me has a Model A pickup, 1927 model. It still works, though it’s on its last legs. I thought it’d be be cool to get a photo of the oldest working Ford I know of, and the very latest.

94 years apart. Built Ford Tough.

D307ED13-B2A1-42FB-8296-873BD9D98C87.jpeg
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Ford are certainly making big statements and hoping to build some very big factories, $11.5billion,


In decline? Not if these factories get the go ahead.
 
Ford are certainly making big statements and hoping to build some very big factories, $11.5billion,


In decline? Not if these factories get the go ahead.
Similar to the above post by @Gout Man , but closer to home . . .

Published by: AUTOCAR magazine, on 24 September 2021.


Ford UK plots EV gearbox production at Halewood factory.

Blue Oval's electrification strategy could see it make a huge investment in the future of its UK factory.


Ford is poised to make a huge investment in its UK manufacturing presence, transforming its Halewood plant into a dedicated electric transmission production facility.

Sky News reports that Ford is in talks with the UK's Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) about the move but that an official decision is still pending.

Ford's ambitious electrification goals mean its European passenger car fleet will go all-electric by 2030, but questions remain over the roles its existing plants across Europe will play in this transformation.

The company is investing more than £700 million in turning its Cologne factory - where the Fiesta is currently built - into a dedicated 'Electrification Centre', but it has yet to officially detail plans for other major facilities, including Halewood, Saarlouis (where the Focus is built) and the engine production plant in Dagenham, Essex.

Only six months ago, Ford safeguarded around 700 jobs at the Halewood plant by ending its 50/50 joint venture with Magna PT (previously Getrag) and taking full control of the facility – as well as a similarly joint-operated site at its European HQ in Cologne.

Plans for Ford to maintain a presence at Halewood were hinted at by plant manager Andy Roche in March, when he said: "We are convinced now with Ford coming in to buy us that they've got plans for us. They took us for a purpose and will want to invest. They’re not going to buy us to shut it down. We see this as a protection of jobs.

"So any new jobs that they create, they will be Ford employees, which is fantastic. It's fantastic to be associated with a world-renowned company."

According to Sky, citing an insider source, Ford would be expected to invest hundreds of millions of pounds at Halewood to adapt it for the production of EV gearboxes.

If confirmed, Ford's move will be the latest in a line of positive news stories for the UK automotive sector. Nissan recently confirmed plans to build a battery factory and a new electric crossover at its Sunderland plant, Jaguar Land Rover vowed to keep its UK sites open as it shifts to electrification and Stellantis safeguarded the future of its Ellesmere Port factory by adapting it to build electric vans.

2018_ford_edge_st_line_white_platinum_035_1_0.jpg


 
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Published by: David Finlay, AUTOCAR magazine, on 28 September 2021.

Every brand ever operated by Ford Motor Company – can you name them all?

While not as prolific a brand-hoarder as arch rival GM, Ford has operated a fair few brands down the years. We explain them all.

Follow link . . .



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