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Ford Motor Company - Is the Corporate decline inevitable?

Published by: Hilton Holloway, AUTOCAR magazine, on 16 July 2019.

Ford to resurrect Mondeo as global mid-sized crossover.

Ford’s stalwart large family car and S-Max and Galaxy MPVs axed in Euro shake-up.

Ford of Europe is preparing a radical re-invention of its European large family car line-up by replacing the Mondeo, S-Max and Galaxy with a single crossover-style estate model.

The new vehicle, whose name is not yet known, will mark Ford’s exit from both the classic large hatchback market and the MPV sector. Although there’s no news on a definitive launch date, the car is expected to arrive in early 2021.

Unlike some of Ford’s bespoke European models, the model will be sold in North America and beyond. In the US it is being compared by insiders to the Subaru Outback, itself a high-riding estate car.

Although a niche model in Europe, the Outback has been a significant success in the US since it was launched two decades ago, with recent sales above 200,000 units annually.

Last July Jim Farley, Ford’s president of new business, technology and strategy, hinted at the move away from conventional road cars towards what he called ‘utility’ body styles. He said the thinking behind the move into medium-rise crossovers was that customers would get “utility benefits without the penalty of poorer fuel economy”.

The new car will be built on Ford’s super-flexible C2 platform, which underpins the new Focus and, in time, should be able to stretch from accommodating the next Fiesta to the future seven-seat Edge SUV. The front section of the architecture will also be used by Ford’s future Transit and Tourneo family.

The model will be offered with petrol and diesel engines plus a 48V mild-hybrid petrol option. The base engine is expected to be Ford’s 1.5-litre three-cylinder turbo petrol unit, which will have a belt-driven electric motor and small battery in mild-hybrid form.

Insiders says that new Euro 6d-compliant diesel engines are, in pollution terms, as clean as petrol engines in real-world use. It is understood that these new oil-burners are still more economical than even mild-hybrid petrol engines, as well as being less expensive.

Ford’s move to medium-height crossovers in Europe is also partly a recognition that meeting future EU fuel economy regulations would have been very difficult with a line-up of conventional SUVs.

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Ford to resurrect Mondeo as global mid-sized crossover | Autocar

Still can't quite believe that the sales in UK for the Mondeo car went from 127000 per year in 1994 to a mere 12000 of which only 900 were private buyers, rest were all fleet sales. Good luck to them trying to compete with cheap leasing deals from "premium" German mfrs.
 
This video popped into my YT feed today...

When I was a teenager, my dad bought a Marina, and later replaced it with an Allegro. To this day, when I am trying to decide what car to buy I think back to my old (now deceased) dad and ask myself which car he would buy,.......and buy something else.
 
When I was a teenager, my dad bought a Marina, and later replaced it with an Allegro. To this day, when I am trying to decide what car to buy I think back to my old (now deceased) dad and ask myself which car he would buy,.......and buy something else.

Sorry about your dad mate.
 
When I was a teenager, my dad bought a Marina, and later replaced it with an Allegro. To this day, when I am trying to decide what car to buy I think back to my old (now deceased) dad and ask myself which car he would buy,.......and buy something else.
Interesting question, but you also have to put yourself with the Product of the time and the cost. A BMW 2002 was not cheap. When I married, my FIL gave me his A60 Oxford which I ran for 4 years. He then bought a Marina,coupe which leaked but was generally reliable, But he couldn't hack the leaks. Instead he bought a Triumph 1500 and that was a Nice car. But rust problems were not unheard of in Ford, Hillman, as the sheet got thinner. Fords could be a pain starting in the cold
 
Interesting question, but you also have to put yourself with the Product of the time and the cost. A BMW 2002 was not cheap. When I married, my FIL gave me his A60 Oxford which I ran for 4 years. He then bought a Marina,coupe which leaked but was generally reliable, But he couldn't hack the leaks. Instead he bought a Triumph 1500 and that was a Nice car. But rust problems were not unheard of in Ford, Hillman, as the sheet got thinner. Fords could be a pain starting in the cold
Well, that is a fair point, but I do remember looking at my mates dad's Fords and even my Grandfather's Vauxhall Cavalier and thinking "why didn't he buy that instead of that shit Allegro". In fact, he did replace the Allegro with a Cavalier, which was a definite step up. The downside was I got the Allegro (under market value, it has to be said).
 
Fords could be a pain starting in the cold

Ah, the "Ford Chorus" as my Dad used to call it. A cold morning came around, and thousands of Fords struggled to fart into life. An oul han at Carlos El Bastardo told me it was because the distributors were down the back of the engine block, and suffered from major condensation on the X-Flows.
 
Well, that is a fair point, but I do remember looking at my mates dad's Fords and even my Grandfather's Vauxhall Cavalier and thinking "why didn't he buy that instead of that shit Allegro". In fact, he did replace the Allegro with a Cavalier, which was a definite step up. The downside was I got the Allegro (under market value, it has to be said).
Cavalier, mmm, well it's predecessor was Viva iirc. My Aunt had an HA and it was passable bit of kit, but only just. By the time Marina got to compete with Cavalier it was a bit long in the tooth. Perhaps a more direct competitor was "Montenogo". But actually the 2.0 ones were quite capable. The less said about the 1.6 with electronic timing the better. How the Hell "aggro" got past the design stage even I cannot understand. There was little appetite for it at the time. There's even a Little Maestro knocking around locally that was a better prospect. I knew two blokes who had Nissan?240 Z's and regular problems with McPherson struts- no problems with the Japanised BMC C series engines. The seventies were just not good times for cars-end of
 
Ah, the "Ford Chorus" as my Dad used to call it. A cold morning came around, and thousands of Fords struggled to fart into life. An oul han at Carlos El Bastardo told me it was because the distributors were down the back of the engine block, and suffered from major condensation on the X-Flows.
at which point you pulled out the Choke on the A60, put the key on first pole and inserted trusty starting handle, by passed starter and hey presto. Not so funny was getting to roundabout, hitting brakes, finding you had none and finding that wheel cylinder had fractured in the cold.
 
Ah, the "Ford Chorus" as my Dad used to call it. A cold morning came around, and thousands of Fords struggled to fart into life. An oul han at Carlos El Bastardo told me it was because the distributors were down the back of the engine block, and suffered from major condensation on the X-Flows.

Ford was apparently slightly better than Vauxhall and BMC but still not as reliable as those Japanese imports which started to come into the UK towards late 60s and early 70s...and which were dependable....no wonder they gained so much market share. Just like Japanese motor bikes.
 
Ford was apparently slightly better than Vauxhall and BMC but still not as reliable as those Japanese imports which started to come into the UK towards late 60s and early 70s...and which were dependable....no wonder they gained so much market share. Just like Japanese motor bikes.
I have to say that dependable as they were, they rusted horrendously. Nor did the U.K. MC market just roll over, demand just started to drop. In the late 40’s 50’s the tax on cars was awful ;the way out was the MC sidecar combo, plus the legacy in fuel rationing. U.K. killed it’s own car market with the HP tax, that’s also paradoxically what hampered our war effort in power out put. The other was the Car derived Van which was cheaper.
 
<snip>Cavalier, mmm, well it's predecessor was Viva iirc. </snip>

70s car segments in Vauxhall were just confused. The Viva was a smaller car than the Cavalier, and its direct replacement was the Chevette, but that didn't come along until a bit later. Thus the Cavalier/Ascona B were in production at the same time as the Viva HC, and for a few years.

There really wasn't a direct car that the Cavalier replaced; it was also in production at the same time as VX4/90s and Victors. These were larger than the Cavalier. The Victor was replaced with the Carlton/Rekord.

Ultimately, with the Chevette, Cavalier and Carlton, they ended up with the segments we have today (or that Ford did with Escort/Cortina/Granada). But it must have been a hard job selling Vauxhalls in about 1974.
 
Cavalier, mmm, well it's predecessor was Viva iirc. My Aunt had an HA and it was passable bit of kit, but only just. By the time Marina got to compete with Cavalier it was a bit long in the tooth. Perhaps a more direct competitor was "Montenogo". But actually the 2.0 ones were quite capable. The less said about the 1.6 with electronic timing the better. How the Hell "aggro" got past the design stage even I cannot understand. There was little appetite for it at the time. There's even a Little Maestro knocking around locally that was a better prospect. I knew two blokes who had Nissan?240 Z's and regular problems with McPherson struts- no problems with the Japanised BMC C series engines. The seventies were just not good times for cars-end of
I was comparing the Allegro with the Cavalier, not the Marina.
My Grandfather did have a Viva before his Cavalier, but the one my dad bought was a 2.0l.
The Maestro was a further development of the Allegro was it not? I know that it was a different shape etc, but the engine was very similar and the cabin concepts were similar. Very space efficient as I recall.
 
Ford was apparently slightly better than Vauxhall and BMC but still not as reliable as those Japanese imports which started to come into the UK towards late 60s and early 70s...and which were dependable....no wonder they gained so much market share. Just like Japanese motor bikes.
My dad replaced his Vx Cavalier with a Mazda 626, which was very reliable up to the point it snapped its camchain on the M8.
 
I was comparing the Allegro with the Cavalier, not the Marina.
My Grandfather did have a Viva before his Cavalier, but the one my dad bought was a 2.0l.
The Maestro was a further development of the Allegro was it not? I know that it was a different shape etc, but the engine was very similar and the cabin concepts were similar. Very space efficient as I recall.
Not really, Maestro/ Montego were sort of offshoots of Marina, just like 400s were redesigned Montego in concept. Mini was supposed to be replaced by the 100 series. What I believe happened was that some of the Aggro concepts got incorporated. Engines were technically A+/O series, B having been dropped iirc, but I quite agree Allegro was a horror.
 
I was comparing the Allegro with the Cavalier, not the Marina.
My Grandfather did have a Viva before his Cavalier, but the one my dad bought was a 2.0l.
The Maestro was a further development of the Allegro was it not? I know that it was a different shape etc, but the engine was very similar and the cabin concepts were similar. Very space efficient as I recall.

It wasn't really related in terms of development like the Ford Escort Mk1 and Mk2 were, say. 1.3L versions shared the same engine, but the frame was deliberately all-new. Hydragas thrown out the window, early models had electronic dashboards. Eventually binned for the same traditional dials fitted to the entirely-related Montego. VW gearbox, if I recall.
 
I have to say that dependable as they were, they rusted horrendously. Nor did the U.K. MC market just roll over, demand just started to drop. In the late 40’s 50’s the tax on cars was awful ;the way out was the MC sidecar combo, plus the legacy in fuel rationing. U.K. killed it’s own car market with the HP tax, that’s also paradoxically what hampered our war effort in power out put. The other was the Car derived Van which was cheaper.

Rust to be fair was an across the board problem during the times...no wonder a lot of "snow belt" older cars are values less compared to ones from sunny states.
 
Rust to be fair was an across the board problem during the times...no wonder a lot of "snow belt" older cars are values less compared to ones from sunny states.
TBF car manufacturers have known for some considerable time how to make corrosion resistant cars, but of course obsolescence is a desirable feature for car companies.
 

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