Foraging

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
What's the best way to cook jews ears?
Very good in stir fry recipes, Chinese supermarkets sell them dried. Finely sliced in an egg foo yung works well. Omelette, suppose a stew as they are rubbery. Keep seeing them called wood ear mushrooms now but that’s a new thing and doesn’t follow its Latin name.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Excellent thread. Any tips on where to learn what is safe to eat and what is not? After going for a meal at Forage and Chatter in Ed last year, who forages many of their ingredients, I keep meaning to take some time out to forage around the Salt Marshes just outside of Edinburgh. Perhaps next weekend.
Start with some chestnuts, can’t get them mixed up. You’ve had a bimble in the woods and a bag full of free snacks.
 
Start with some chestnuts, can’t get them mixed up. You’ve had a bimble in the woods and a bag full of free snacks.

Great idea. I used to do that with wild garlic which grew in nearby woods - it goes very nice with cheese.
 
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How about the subject of gleaning ?

I've had Potatoes, soya beans, undersize cauliflowers in big quantities after harvest and its classed as waste by farmers.
 

TamH70

MIA

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
How about the subject of gleaning ?

I've had Potatoes, soya beans, undersize cauliflowers in big quantities after harvest and its classed as waste by farmers.
I guess someone came up with a name for helping oneself to leftover stuff. We came back from Filey one year after my Dad gleaned 13 sacks of spuds from a field that had been used for McCain chips. Huge spuds they were. I’ve gleaned things from farmers fields in the dark.
 
I guess someone came up with a name for helping oneself to leftover stuff. We came back from Filey one year after my Dad gleaned 13 sacks of spuds from a field that had been used for McCain chips. Huge spuds they were. I’ve gleaned things from farmers fields in the dark.

Hmmm.. I've gleaned a couple of laptops fron clients who were "having cashflow issues..."
 
Mrs HT and I went on a mushroom foraging trip in the New Forest last month with John Wright, of River Cottage fame. It was a hugely enjoyable day, and an educational one, but I am none the wiser about what to eat and what not to, that there was wine at lunch may have something to do do with this.
I did that course, brilliant day out. The only issue is that it depends what has grown that day in the wood block John has chosen. And he thinks all mushrooms are interesting not just the edible ones.
 
Hmmm.. I've gleaned a couple of laptops fron clients who were "having cashflow issues..."
A few weeks ago I gleaned $80 from the change dispenser of the supermarket self service checkout........I think someone forgot their cash back.
 
Dandelions back in Victorian days used to be included in salads - the leaves and flowers. If you was and clean the roots you can use them to make tea by either mashing up and soaking in hot water, or drying to keep and using later.

Dandelions have a stomach settling quality which works a bit like taking an anti-acid chalk tablet. It is known that dogs will eat dandelions if they have bad tum’s, and in the spring inNorth America bears snack on dandelions like they are haribos.

Don’t forget camomile pick the whole thing, bundle up a few, turn them upside down and hang to dry under cover. Then when you, the Mrs or kids start getting blocked noses from a cold drop a bundle in some hot water to release the smell, put a towel over your head and get your nose over the bowl breathing and sniffing in deeply to clear the mucus.
 

TamH70

MIA
Dandelions back in Victorian days used to be included in salads - the leaves and flowers. If you was and clean the roots you can use them to make tea by either mashing up and soaking in hot water, or drying to keep and using later.

Dandelions have a stomach settling quality which works a bit like taking an anti-acid chalk tablet. It is known that dogs will eat dandelions if they have bad tum’s, and in the spring inNorth America bears snack on dandelions like they are haribos.

Don’t forget camomile pick the whole thing, bundle up a few, turn them upside down and hang to dry under cover. Then when you, the Mrs or kids start getting blocked noses from a cold drop a bundle in some hot water to release the smell, put a towel over your head and get your nose over the bowl breathing and sniffing in deeply to clear the mucus.
I used to have the Collins Gem version of Lofty Wiseman's SAS Survival Guide, and I'm sure that dandelions and their uses of appeared.

I'm thinking of grabbing another copy and doing some studying of its chapters on food acquisition.
 
Having flown the flag for wild garlic I am ashamed to say that it never dawned on me to try the bulbs or flowers. The old Chinese crone that showed me the garlic only used the stalks. I only used the stalks in the same way you might use dill. Duh.

Back up the thread someone mentioned salt marshes. These are good foraging sites for samphire.

(I suppose that if you were brave enough you might be able to forage/glean/rustle the odd salt marsh lamb as well.)
 
Having flown the flag for wild garlic I am ashamed to say that it never dawned on me to try the bulbs or flowers. The old Chinese crone that showed me the garlic only used the stalks. I only used the stalks in the same way you might use dill. Duh.

Back up the thread someone mentioned salt marshes. These are good foraging sites for samphire.

(I suppose that if you were brave enough you might be able to forage/glean/rustle the odd salt marsh lamb as well.)

I used to cut up the leaves and flowers and sprinkle them on a strong mature cheddar cheese.

I think this weekend I’ll take a look around the Edinburgh salt marshes. I like the lamb idea but not sure my other half will be so amenable to that!
 
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gorillaguts981

War Hero
Large diameter dandelion roots can be scrubbed and the root hairs removed, sliced 2 or 3 mm thick then roasted to a dark brown, then oven on low until fully dry. Grind and use like coffee (filter paper is best). Mellow pleasant taste. Also pine needle tea. Acquired taste but full of vit C.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I can tell when the wild garlic is in bloom, my spaniels smell of it and any I pick gets a good wash!
 
I used to have the Collins Gem version of Lofty Wiseman's SAS Survival Guide, and I'm sure that dandelions and their uses of appeared.

I'm thinking of grabbing another copy and doing some studying of its chapters on food acquisition.
If you go on am@zon and search books: Foods for Free, you get a fair few results which probably have more breadth of info than Lofty's magnificent tome.


Once you start reading and looking around it is amazing the number of vegetables which used to be eaten, probably up to around just post WW2, and have since vanished as a result of modern convenient processed food. Most of those veggie's are still around and nowadays appear as decorative garden plants, or are classed as weed's just because no one know any different.

If you find a field full of thistles growing wild right at the top in the thistle flower part there is a small nut like object which is edible. Useful if you are peckish when bimbling through the coutryside. Hazlenuts too if you are lucky to find some, though they are better if roasted in a mess tin before eating.

Large diameter dandelion roots can be scrubbed and the root hairs removed, sliced 2 or 3 mm thick then roasted to a dark brown, then oven on low until fully dry. Grind and use like coffee (filter paper is best). Mellow pleasant taste. Also pine needle tea. Acquired taste but full of vit C.
You can always raid the rose bushes in the neighbours garden and make some rose hip tea.
 

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