Foraging

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How come if you're on ROP's you can still post and view the threads? Everytime I'be been on them the site is blocked (unless you make a new temp account).
I might have gotten lucky?
 
Excellent thread. Any tips on where to learn what is safe to eat and what is not? After going for a meal at Forage and Chatter in Ed last year, who forages many of their ingredients, I keep meaning to take some time out to forage around the Salt Marshes just outside of Edinburgh. Perhaps next weekend.
There are courses out there for mushrooming and this is about the time of year for them so have a google on that.

I used to carry a couple of the little Collins Gem books in my daypack when out and about, cos you will never recognise everything:

Food For Free, Richard Mabey.
Trees, Alastair Fitter
 
There are courses out there for mushrooming and this is about the time of year for them so have a google on that.

I used to carry a couple of the little Collins Gem books in my daypack when out and about, cos you will never recognise everything:

Food For Free, Richard Mabey.
Trees, Alastair Fitter
I second that, find an expert and go on an organised forage.
 
I would say that it’s a bit late for ‘shrooming (here in south Hampshire), but with a hot dry summer most things are a bit late. I have generally found that looking for edible mushrooms is best where there are livestock, especially paddocks. A few years back a friend and I cooked lots of lovely puffballs in the pub kitchen in garlic butter. Like eating steak. Sadly, most paddock owners near here have stopped keeping nags and let the land go. Derelict land is easier to get permission to build on.
Reflections from here: bumper year for fruit, especially crab apples and rose hips. Sloes ok, here they now crop about mid July.
Nettles: ok, summer a bit hot and dry. Same with wild garlic, short season. Acorns abound, not that great a year for chestnuts.
Low water levels mean easy access but poor pickings for a cheeky pull of watercress in the Meon valley.
Thank the gods for Aldi, eh?
 
There are courses out there for mushrooming and this is about the time of year for them so have a google on that.

I used to carry a couple of the little Collins Gem books in my daypack when out and about, cos you will never recognise everything:

Food For Free, Richard Mabey.
Trees, Alastair Fitter
Thanks for the advice - I'm pretty sure I've read there are such tours around the salt marsh, so I'll look into it.

Thanks for the book suggestions, too.
 
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I think the license is basically a way of stating or showing that you know the difference between a uk and signal crayfish. And that you cannot throw a signal back , you have to eat it or stamp on it etc.
It's because there are a few waters where the native crayfish is still the more numerous, so you won't get a licence for those. You have to state the waters you'll be trapping on the application. Never tried it, just watched a Youtube video.
 
I second that, find an expert and go on an organised forage.
Mrs HT and I went on a mushroom foraging trip in the New Forest last month with John Wright, of River Cottage fame. It was a hugely enjoyable day, and an educational one, but I am none the wiser about what to eat and what not to, that there was wine at lunch may have something to do do with this.
 
Mrs HT and I went on a mushroom foraging trip in the New Forest last month with John Wright, of River Cottage fame. It was a hugely enjoyable day, and an educational one, but I am none the wiser about what to eat and what not to, that there was wine at lunch may have something to do do with this.
Enjoyable, but not educational ..... sometimes enjoyable is good though. Reaching back to the dark recesses of the past I am pretty sure it was Lofty (yes HIM) who had a set of mushroom/fungi teaching models. Castings of the real things and all nicely painted up to look the part - firkin good training aid.

For those of you who like exotic and expensive shroom's you should go and grab yourself an old log and buy a shroom growing kit. You can set them up in the back garden and save a small fortune on shitake and pink oyster shrooms and only also need to walk just outside the back door to safely harvest your crop.
 
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Enjoyable, but not educational ..... sometimes enjoyable is good though. Reaching back to the dark recesses of the past I am pretty sure it was Lofty (yes HIM) who had a set of mushroom/fungi teaching models. Castings of the real things and all nicely painted up to look the part - firkin good training aid.

For those of you who like exotic and expensive shroom's you should go and grap yourself an old log and buy a shroom growing kit. You can set them up in the back garden and save a small fortune on shitake and pink oyster shrooms and only also need to walk just outside the back door to safely harvest your crop.
Agreed, if you're a neophyte. One of the mushroom farms north of where I live (which got shut down because it was a front for drug smuggling) would sell you the mycelium for oyster mushrooms for something like $5, but you harvested far more than $5 worth of mushrooms.
 
Seems Jarrod has made a good start with his forest cottaging (for-aging) endeavor.
 
Imported chestnuts are just awful. The U.K. ones are so much better and free! My Grandad used to keep them in buckets filled with soil.
When you gather sweet chestnuts, keep a few to plant. You have to keep then in the fridge over winter etc etc.
Oh sod it Google it.

CFB
Take an Orange from the box.
 
Enjoyable, but not educational ..... sometimes enjoyable is good though. Reaching back to the dark recesses of the past I am pretty sure it was Lofty (yes HIM) who had a set of mushroom/fungi teaching models. Castings of the real things and all nicely painted up to look the part - firkin good training aid.

For those of you who like exotic and expensive shroom's you should go and grap yourself an old log and buy a shroom growing kit. You can set them up in the back garden and save a small fortune on shitake and pink oyster shrooms and only also need to walk just outside the back door to safely harvest your crop.
Enjoyable is very good, we didn't go to become overnight experts, we went to have a good day out and maybe learn something. It was great fun, and the extent of Johns knowledge is incredible.
 
Sloes: apart from gin, what?


My lad has his 21st birthday pressie squirrelled away. As a baby, with my hand guiding, he picked 6 sloes just after first frost. They are now in a bottle of excellent gin, missing a nip, with a spoonful of raw cane sugar, sealed in wax and linen. Last time i looked, a rich golden colour like Scotch. 6 sloes, one damson.

Should be good. He's nearly 14.

If it's good, I'll kick myself for only doing the one, although his sister is 11...
 
Sloes: apart from gin, what?


My lad has his 21st birthday pressie squirrelled away. As a baby, with my hand guiding, he picked 6 sloes just after first frost. They are now in a bottle of excellent gin, missing a nip, with a spoonful of raw cane sugar, sealed in wax and linen. Last time i looked, a rich golden colour like Scotch. 6 sloes, one damson.

Should be good. He's nearly 14.

If it's good, I'll kick myself for only doing the one, although his sister is 11...

I've always thought sea buckthorn would work well as a flavour for gin.
 

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