Foraging

The rules on catching American crayfish seem slightly odd at the moment.

It used to be that you could catch them at will in canals. British Waterways used to allow free foraging and only asked you to notify them as to how many you caught and where. I doubt if many people bothered!

Nowadays there seems to be a requirement for a (free) license from the Environmental Agency. I don’t know if that is only for rivers though. Canals come under the jurisdiction of the Canal and River Trust and I don’t know what the position is currently. Their website is not very informative.

Still, I doubt The Crayfish Nazis will bang you up for catching what is an invasive pest.
Just looked online at this.
Not as straightforward as it seems.
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
Lucky enough to live in a valley carpeted in wild garlic. I don't use the bulbs, but in May/June when they are in bloom, I use the flowers to flavour coleslaw, soups etc. The whole place has a pleasant smell of garlic on a hot day.
 
Lucky enough to live in a valley carpeted in wild garlic. I don't use the bulbs, but in May/June when they are in bloom, I use the flowers to flavour coleslaw, soups etc. The whole place has a pleasant smell of garlic on a hot day.
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall walt
 
The rules on catching American crayfish seem slightly odd at the moment.

It used to be that you could catch them at will in canals. British Waterways used to allow free foraging and only asked you to notify them as to how many you caught and where. I doubt if many people bothered!

Nowadays there seems to be a requirement for a (free) license from the Environmental Agency. I don’t know if that is only for rivers though. Canals come under the jurisdiction of the Canal and River Trust and I don’t know what the position is currently. Their website is not very informative.

Still, I doubt The Crayfish Nazis will bang you up for catching what is an invasive pest.
The canal and river trust only has a skeleton staff on the ground, most of them in the office don't even know where the canals are, and they have never enforced any waterways bylaws since they were created, not one. There are crayfish trappers operating but not overtly.
 
Get some clean dry jars, the put some garlic leaves through a blender, with some neutral oil, and a good jolt of salt, to make a loose paste.

It keeps well in the fridge.
 
Lucky enough to live in a valley carpeted in wild garlic. I don't use the bulbs, but in May/June when they are in bloom, I use the flowers to flavour coleslaw, soups etc. The whole place has a pleasant smell of garlic on a hot day.
Lucky bugger. We have poachers from La Belle Province coming into Ontario and pilfering our wild garlic because Quebec has made wild garlic a vulnerable species.

 
I look for Snickers bars in the Halloween candy pile. Maybe a Butterfinger when I feel like Private Pyle.
I must have 10 lbs. of chocolate and other tooth rotting materials available after halloween. I do quite like the Butterfingers, but sadly the snickers have all got that white crap over the faux chocolate which tastes like clingfilm on a good day anyway.

Back to proper foraging.

Florida: I used to bimble around my local part of florida and find the occasional tropical fruit tree's dotted around mainly citrus fruits on abandoned farm's. There were also lots of Saw Palmetto palms around which some of the poorer locals used to assault for their berries when they were in season as they could sell them to herbal supplement/drug companies to use in pill's for prostrate cancer. The problem with Florida is the snakes, poisonous one's like rattlesnakes, cotton mouths and nowadays the Everglades is host to an estimated 100,000 Burmese Pythons. The pythons escaped from an importer after a hurricane and have spread dramatically killing off local wildlife - they have found 20ft long pythons with whole swallowed adult deer in their tummy's - the pythons are spreading north towards Georgia. It's ok though King Cobra's kill and eat pythons and a few of those have been found slithering around free too.

Pennsylvania: I quite liked Pennsylvania even though it is like living in a permafrost environment for 6 months of the year. In the warm months it is pretty much like europe with blackberries, raspberries, fruits and the like. Don't wander too far into the ulu though as there are rattle snakes and bears up there.

Texas: Dire. Unless you find it in the supermarket you can't eat it. Plenty of four legged beasts around from wild pigs to deer, but nothing really growing wild that you can forage and eat. Added to which 99% of land in Texarrse is privately owned and people shoot at trespassers here. OH yeah, snakes and scorpions here too.

I forgot the spiders. Poisonous one's like black widows, brown recluse, tarantulas and jumping spiders. They don't really kill you, but can cause you severe pain and discomfort. An acquaintance was wearing shorts, got bitten on a testicle and it swelled up like a tennis ball.

So, no, I don't go foraging much.
 
I must have 10 lbs. of chocolate and other tooth rotting materials available after halloween. I do quite like the Butterfingers, but sadly the snickers have all got that white crap over the faux chocolate which tastes like clingfilm on a good day anyway.

Back to proper foraging.

Florida: I used to bimble around my local part of florida and find the occasional tropical fruit tree's dotted around mainly citrus fruits on abandoned farm's. There were also lots of Saw Palmetto palms around which some of the poorer locals used to assault for their berries when they were in season as they could sell them to herbal supplement/drug companies to use in pill's for prostrate cancer. The problem with Florida is the snakes, poisonous one's like rattlesnakes, cotton mouths and nowadays the Everglades is host to an estimated 100,000 Burmese Pythons. The pythons escaped from an importer after a hurricane and have spread dramatically killing off local wildlife - they have found 20ft long pythons with whole swallowed adult deer in their tummy's - the pythons are spreading north towards Georgia. It's ok though King Cobra's kill and eat pythons and a few of those have been found slithering around free too.

Pennsylvania: I quite liked Pennsylvania even though it is like living in a permafrost environment for 6 months of the year. In the warm months it is pretty much like europe with blackberries, raspberries, fruits and the like. Don't wander too far into the ulu though as there are rattle snakes and bears up there.

Texas: Dire. Unless you find it in the supermarket you can't eat it. Plenty of four legged beasts around from wild pigs to deer, but nothing really growing wild that you can forage and eat. Added to which 99% of land in Texarrse is privately owned and people shoot at trespassers here. OH yeah, snakes and scorpions here too.

I forgot the spiders. Poisonous one's like black widows, brown recluse, tarantulas and jumping spiders. They don't really kill you, but can cause you severe pain and discomfort. An acquaintance was wearing shorts, got bitten on a testicle and it swelled up like a tennis ball.

So, no, I don't go foraging much.

Wuss..... try Louisiana.

Those rascals eat frogs, road- kill, anything.

1572802947767.png


If you haven't seen the show, "Swamp People " is worth watchng.
 

dontenn

War Hero
My still works overtime making my different flavoured Gins, from apples to elderberries and plum,
 
Excellent thread. Any tips on where to learn what is safe to eat and what is not? After going for a meal at Forage and Chatter in Ed last year, who forages many of their ingredients, I keep meaning to take some time out to forage around the Salt Marshes just outside of Edinburgh. Perhaps next weekend.
 
Last edited:
My eldest brother used to make elderberry wine and it was bloody good.
Blackberries make sensational wine.

Did some years ago without added yeast, as there was a 'blush' of natural yeast on the gathered berries.

Fast forward to next summer, we take a couple of bottles to a party.

Well.... it seems them wild yeasts were a bit hard core. Visual and auditory distortion, hysterical giggles. According to some of our friends, it was like magic mushrooms.

Tasted fantastic too.


Naturally, the remaining 4 bottles were poured down the sink.

Ahem.
 
The riskiness of real morels is taken care of by cooking them.

I thought I had hit a bumper crop of morels one year, but unfortunately they were stinkhorns, and that name is really well-earned.
I'm a bitwary of wild fungus.

I had a foraging book, can't remember the exact details but on two pages about half the book apart there were pictures of different fungi which looked, to me, identical.

One was called something like "tasty chickenbreast o' the forest". The other something like "avenging psycho Angel of Hell".


The first pleasant as part of a hearty stew, the second sent you raving mad for the final 4 days of your screaming, agonised life before you shat your liver out and died.


I get mushrooms Waitrose now.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Not foraging for scoff or berries etc, but the large field next to my property is called 'Gallows Field.' It's where Judge Jefferys had the local people executed after the local Assizes in 1685, after 'The Battle of Sedgemore.'
The farmer ploughs gallows field each autumn about now. It's great walking the ploughed raised ground where the watching crowds sat. Over the years I have found loads of coins, brooches, rings etc. It was ploughed yesterday so I will have an enjoyable day out tomorrow. five years ago I found a lovely gold ring with a ruby that predated the Rebellion, ,sold it for £1400.00.
Incidentally our local blackberries have been in profusion until just a few weeks ago. I have loads in the freezer ready for blackberry tarts this winter.
 

Latest Threads

Top