Foraging

I look for Snickers bars in the Halloween candy pile. Maybe a Butterfinger when I feel like Private Pyle.
I see you are still on ROPs, what did you do?
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Fodder maize can be eaten when its the size of baby sweetcorn, too late this year though.

Also fodder beets are perfectly edible , simlar to turnips, they are in the fields now round my way.

Shops throw away tons of pumpkins after Halloween, they are edible too, mashed, in stews or soups or pies.
 
Elderberry vinegar is lovely, as is Hawthorn.
Sloe gin, don't wait for a frost, put them in the freezer overnight before making it. Hedgerow cordial (blackberries, blueberries, rosehips, hawthorn etc.) boiled up with honey is packed with vitamin c.
Conkers can be used to make clothes washing liquid and it really does work, we haven't bought any detergent for about a month now.
It's the wrong time of year I know but nettle and wild garlic soup is ace, and full of protein.
Seconded on the wild garlic front. I saw an old Chinese lady picking it alongside the old Longmoor Military Railway, asked her what she was picking and got into picking it. Great in omelettes, soups and with fish.

A good forage if you live near a canal (especially a rural one) is American crayfish. Easy to catch and double up as free scampi. Got into that after watching Chinese blokes catching bucketloads on the Basingstoke Canal near Aldershot. Probably from the local takeaway.

I will always collect blackberries etc whilst out walking. Oddly I haven’t seen a rosehip for ages. I do love a home made sloe gin or vodka. Find ‘em, pick ‘em, prick ‘em with a fork, stick in bottle with alcohol and sugar to taste and leave for a few months. Lush.

I have found that people with fruit trees rarely say no to you collecting some of their fruit. I get the impression that a lot of people nowadays don’t actually realise that fruit grows on trees and is actually edible.
 
Seconded on the wild garlic front. I saw an old Chinese lady picking it alongside the old Longmoor Military Railway, asked her what she was picking and got into picking it. Great in omelettes, soups and with fish.

A good forage if you live near a canal (especially a rural one) is American crayfish. Easy to catch and double up as free scampi. Got into that after watching Chinese blokes catching bucketloads on the Basingstoke Canal near Aldershot. Probably from the local takeaway.

I will always collect blackberries etc whilst out walking. Oddly I haven’t seen a rosehip for ages. I do love a home made sloe gin or vodka. Find ‘em, pick ‘em, prick ‘em with a fork, stick in bottle with alcohol and sugar to taste and leave for a few months. Lush.

I have found that people with fruit trees rarely say no to you collecting some of their fruit. I get the impression that a lot of people nowadays don’t actually realise that fruit grows on trees and is actually edible.
Some say prick them with a thorn from the same blackthorn bush. No need to bother though. Just remove any stalks, leaves etc and wash in a sieve, then shake dry. Put them in bags in the freezer. When you thaw them out they are as good if not better than if you had pricked them.
 
American signal crayfish. They do enormous damage to the environment. I'm looking at getting a crayfish trap and using it on some of the local ponds.

On the plus side, they taste delicious.
 
For those that can be bothered to make elderberry wine and find removing the berries from that stalk a PIA:

Take a grill from your oven and place it (the grill) on top of a clean bucket (I used a fermenting bin). Rub the "vines" up and down agains the horizontal grill wires. This strips the berries with a minimum of fuss.
 
The rules on catching American crayfish seem slightly odd at the moment.

It used to be that you could catch them at will in canals. British Waterways used to allow free foraging and only asked you to notify them as to how many you caught and where. I doubt if many people bothered!

Nowadays there seems to be a requirement for a (free) license from the Environmental Agency. I don’t know if that is only for rivers though. Canals come under the jurisdiction of the Canal and River Trust and I don’t know what the position is currently. Their website is not very informative.

Still, I doubt The Crayfish Nazis will bang you up for catching what is an invasive pest.
 
The rules on catching American crayfish seem slightly odd at the moment.

It used to be that you could catch them at will in canals. British Waterways used to allow free foraging and only asked you to notify them as to how many you caught and where. I doubt if many people bothered!

Nowadays there seems to be a requirement for a (free) license from the Environmental Agency. I don’t know if that is only for rivers though. Canals come under the jurisdiction of the Canal and River Trust and I don’t know what the position is currently. Their website is not very informative.

Still, I doubt The Crayfish Nazis will bang you up for catching what is an invasive pest.
I think the license is basically a way of stating or showing that you know the difference between a uk and signal crayfish. And that you cannot throw a signal back , you have to eat it or stamp on it etc.
 
American signal crayfish. They do enormous damage to the environment. I'm looking at getting a crayfish trap and using it on some of the local ponds.

On the plus side, they taste delicious.
Not sure about ponds, but on rivers dont forget an Environment Agency permit.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Oddly I haven’t seen a rosehip for ages.
Some of the estate tenants forage for rosehips, they will never scratch the surface let alone damage the millions of wild food we have
 
R.e crayfish , I think you might have to buy an approved trap as well , to do with the hole sizes etc to let out native crayfish.
Obviously you can freely catch then with a piece of string and bacon etc.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
The Drunken Botanist- The Plants That Create The World's Great Drinks



I've ordered the above for the other half as a stocking filler.

Amy Stewart is also the author of "Wicked Plants" all about the poisonous and/or just play arsey members of the plant kingdom.
 
The Drunken Botanist- The Plants That Create The World's Great Drinks's Great Drinks



I've ordered the above for the other half as a stocking filler.

Amy Stewart is also the author of "Wicked Plants" all about the poisonous and/or just play arsey members of the plant kingdom.
 

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