Foraging for the officers' Mess

Always useful to have a piece of paper.

Line sergeant at Soest D.B gets charged for disobeying a direct order in that he failed to have an aircraft ready for flight at 9 AM as per the daily flying order.

Marched in front of the O.C and produces the aforementioned flying order which states clearly 09.30..
Case dismissed.

The Flight Commander gets a stand up conversation with the O.C (no tea or biscuits).
Were there no WOs to carry out a simple sanity check before it went to the OC? Seems a bit odd.
 
Were there no WOs to carry out a simple sanity check before it went to the OC? Seems a bit odd.
The flight commander was a captain who saw his arrse. How would a W.O affect that decision?
Especially as the line sergeant was R.E.M.E and the flight commander A.A.C.
If anyone had noticed his idiocy then he would have to back down with serious loss of face.

Another incident was where a Sergeant pilot was charged with being late on parade by the new S.S.M who held the parade earlier than stated on orders.

Same S.S.M charged my good self and two other R.E.M.E. airtechs for being late on parade on a separate occasion. We were waiting for transport to work which had unbeknown to us broken down.
As we were the duty crew we jumped into one of the guys cars to get in for the flying program.
When we challenged the charge we were told that as we travelled by private transport we were late for work.
Meanwhile the rest of the troops were still sat outside the accomodation. That one did get thrown out.
 
The flight commander was a captain who saw his arrse. How would a W.O affect that decision?
Especially as the line sergeant was R.E.M.E and the flight commander A.A.C.
If anyone had noticed his idiocy then he would have to back down with serious loss of face.

Another incident was where a Sergeant pilot was charged with being late on parade by the new S.S.M who held the parade earlier than stated on orders.

Same S.S.M charged my good self and two other R.E.M.E. airtechs for being late on parade on a separate occasion. We were waiting for transport to work which had unbeknown to us broken down.
As we were the duty crew we jumped into one of the guys cars to get in for the flying program.
When we challenged the charge we were told that as we travelled by private transport we were late for work.
Meanwhile the rest of the troops were still sat outside the accomodation. That one did get thrown out.
It just seems a little odd to me that it got so far so fast. I have been thinking about this and can't remember a single instance of an officer being the person that charged someone for something like that. It would normally fall to the Tp Sgt/Ssgt or the SSM. Before the paperwork was even started, someone would be 'assigned' if you like, to find out what went on. If that had happened in this case, the OC's day would never had been interrupted and no face lost.
 
Good that 'you' got called to account, bad that 'you' escaped execution. During the period of one tour, The Hollow at Ballykinler had all of the thousands of rabbits exterminated by árseholes with shotguns. Ārseholes.

Back in 1953 1KOSB, having just returned from almost 4 years unaccompanied in FARELF (including 16 months in the Korean War) were stationed in Ballykinler, many a Pad's larder was supplemented by rabbits shot on Ballykinler ranges...didn't seem to make an appreciable difference to the rabbit population though...there were thousands of them. Still have fond memories of my Mum's rabbit pie.
 
Back in 1953 1KOSB, having just returned from almost 4 years unaccompanied in FARELF (including 16 months in the Korean War) were stationed in Ballykinler, many a Pad's larder was supplemented by rabbits shot on Ballykinler ranges...didn't seem to make an appreciable difference to the rabbit population though...there were thousands of them. Still have fond memories of my Mum's rabbit pie.
Very hard pressed to see a rabbit in County Down now. All the wildlife I see is is occasional dead badgers, rats and foxes on the roads. although my CCTV tells me that one or two do slink around the farmyard on occasion. Morons with shotguns to blame. No; I don't really care about the chicken, duck and goose keepers, who should protect their birds adequately. 'Sports' shooters are the culprits, not the farmers.
 
Very hard pressed to see a rabbit in County Down now. All the wildlife I see is is occasional dead badgers, rats and foxes on the roads. although my CCTV tells me that one or two do slink around the farmyard on occasion. Morons with shotguns to blame. No; I don't really care about the chicken, duck and goose keepers, who should protect their birds adequately. 'Sports' shooters are the culprits, not the farmers.

Sad to hear, Whisky, that area in the early 1950s, back when I was a 'Pad Brat' was home to an abundance of wildlife, a tranquil, beautiful, place.
 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
How old was Custer??
37 when he died

Try some young Britons

Bernard Freyburg - Lieutenant to Brigadier from 1914 to 1917 in three years. Date of birth 21 March 1889 - 28 year old brigadier. VC DSO and two bars Wounded nine times and mentioned in dispatches six times or vice-versa.

Brigadier General Roland Boys Bradford, VC, MC (23 February 1892 – 30 November 1917) KIA as a brigadier aged 25.

Field Marshal Richard Michael Power Carver, Baron Carver, GCB, CBE, DSO & Bar, MC (24 April 1915 – 9 December 2001) Brigadier aged 29.

Major General George Philip Bradley Roberts, CB, DSO & Two Bars, MC (5 November 1906 – 5 November 1997), GOC 11 Armoured Division in Normandy aged 35
.
 
Field Marshal Richard Michael Power Carver, Baron Carver, GCB, CBE, DSO & Bar, MC (24 April 1915 – 9 December 2001) Brigadier aged 29.
I met Carver, once, in a briefing room at HQUKLF on a Major Exercise. He wandered in, glanced at my map and the immaculately-drawn symbols on it, said something under his breath to some senior bod next to him and wandered out.

I was overcome by the Presence of a Genuine Leader. He wandered with authority; something I consciously emulated in later years but was sadly not up to the role; I do loathe people who giggle.
 
I met Carver, once, in a briefing room at HQUKLF on a Major Exercise. He wandered in, glanced at my map and the immaculately-drawn symbols on it, said something under his breath to some senior bod next to him and wandered out.

I was overcome by the Presence of a Genuine Leader. He wandered with authority; something I consciously emulated in later years but was sadly not up to the role; I do loathe people who giggle.
Met him a couple of times was a little distant and seemed to regard us subbies with a degree of tolerance.

One one occasion he being a Field Marshall and Col Comdt interpreted the order of dress for a battlefield tour in an interesting way, rather than trousers LW, boots DMS and puttes, he wore trousers Barrack Dress, boots DMS and puttees, this did not do anything his sartorial elegance.
 
37 when he died

Try some young Britons

Bernard Freyburg - Lieutenant to Brigadier from 1914 to 1917 in three years. Date of birth 21 March 1889 - 28 year old brigadier. VC DSO and two bars Wounded nine times and mentioned in dispatches six times or vice-versa.

Brigadier General Roland Boys Bradford, VC, MC (23 February 1892 – 30 November 1917) KIA as a brigadier aged 25.

Field Marshal Richard Michael Power Carver, Baron Carver, GCB, CBE, DSO & Bar, MC (24 April 1915 – 9 December 2001) Brigadier aged 29.

Major General George Philip Bradley Roberts, CB, DSO & Two Bars, MC (5 November 1906 – 5 November 1997), GOC 11 Armoured Division in Normandy aged 35
.
Pip Roberts - not 35 - read age 37
 
IMG_20210819_085353_664.jpg
mushroom soup today sirs . Made it myself I did.
Enjoy .
 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
I met Carver, once, in a briefing room at HQUKLF on a Major Exercise. He wandered in, glanced at my map and the immaculately-drawn symbols on it, said something under his breath to some senior bod next to him and wandered out.

I was overcome by the Presence of a Genuine Leader. He wandered with authority; something I consciously emulated in later years but was sadly not up to the role; I do loathe people who giggle.
I "met" Carver a couple of times, for the first I was in the audience for an after dinner speach delivered to the captains and above of the 4th Armoured Brigade. This was in 1984. He had commanded 4th Armoured Brigade in 1944 as a captain acting brigadier and then in 1964 as a substantive brigadier. His talks was about commanding a brigade in battle. The bit about relations with juniors was about knowing when someone needed to be sacked. Relations with seniors was all about how to get away with only obeying the orders you want to obey - oh and how to get your superiors sacked. The second time I spoke to him after a lecture at RUSI promoting his book on the Boer war. He wa sa better speaker than writer.
 

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