For retired officers only!

#1
If you think this is a bit bone, go to the NAAFI or something, hoping for a serious discussion here….. (and really putting my head on the chopping block for this)

The abridged version is this: Do you now after doing your stint, and having been successful in your civi-career, at a later stage of life find yourself getting bored, and wishing you could join up again?

I did my (not very long) stint, without really getting stuck in. My head was full of all the other ambitions I had, but couldn’t achieve in the Army. So I left, and have had a very exciting and fulfilling life, and have achieved just about all of the ambitions I had.

There are two things niggling me. At the time I jacked in my commission in order to achieve other things, it didn’t occur to me that at a later stage of life I would see my army time as an uncompleted chapter. The other thing is, I am getting very bored. I have a very well-paid responsible job, live in a great country (Norway), lots of outdoor activities, charge up and down mountains in boots and on skis, big hobby-projects (restoring an old house amongst other things), great family and good social life.

The problem is I can’t bear the thought of doing this for another 15 years. So why should I? Same as you - wife and family.

Wish I could just don a uniform, and get posted off somewhere and overdose on Army life again.

Any other sad feckers out there ?????
 
#2
I'm a sad fecker but not so sad that I discount the possibility that OR (WOI in my case) can have the same feelings as an Officer.
From my contacts amongst these now outside The Family, what you are experiencing is fairly routine. My civilian career was a success in respect of employment and reward but it in no way matched service life. Civilians ARE different but it might not be their fault.
I've not found how to resolve the home sickness. I'm careful to stay away from most things military - Edinburgh Tattoo is a three hanky event.
 
#3
I'm not an officer by any means. What 'ambitions' did you have that couldn't be fulfilled in the army? You obviously have a passion for mountaineering and skiing - both recognised army sports. I know its none of my business but did you do less than 4 years?
 
#4
You left, you miss it, boohoo, get over it.

What about joining a reserve unit? (You don't say how old you are so this may not be an option).

There must be something out there that you can turn your hand to that would bring some of the Army life to yours.
 
#5
PS a title like "For retired officers only!" just invites non retired types to come on the thread. :D
 
#6
OldRedCap : Please don't think I believe your feelings are any different. Indeed other places on this site I have seen similar feelings expressed by OR's. The only reason for posting here was that as an ex-rupert it is more natural for me to post here than anywhere else. No offence was meant, and if any was taken, I apologise.

No1cares: I was obsessed by music, in the way that only musicians can be. After leaving I pursued a 2nd career as a guitarist, freelance, studio and with a few reasonably (at the time) well known acts. Having tasted Germany, but not having a chance to get really stuck in to the language, I wanted to get fluent in another language, and absorb the culture of another country from the inside. I have now lived in Norway for 20 years. I did a few days less than 4 years.

Chocolate_frog: "You left, you miss it, boohoo, get over it". My sentiments entirely, and really what I need is a kick up the @rse as a reminder of how lucky I am. I know, a luxury problem - and I do appreciate you taking the trouble to respond.

I am 50 (fit as a fecker can be) and living in Norway, so a reserve unit is out of the question, unfortunately.

I might add, that not all of this is my fault. For 13 years my life was dedicated to looking after my very ill daughter, so I couldn't do anything else (and didn't want to). She died 9 years ago, three years after a heart and lung transplant. It is first now, that absolutely everything is in place in my life again, that I'm finding everyday life boring.

The title "For retired officers only" was really just a warning as to who had written it!
 
#7
phibeck said:
I am 50 (fit as a fecker can be) and living in Norway, so a reserve unit is out of the question, unfortunately.
TA officers can now serve until 60. Could still do All Arms Watchkeepers Pool and live overseas.
 
#8
Fred_Cat said:
phibeck said:
I am 50 (fit as a fecker can be) and living in Norway, so a reserve unit is out of the question, unfortunately.
TA officers can now serve until 60. Could still do All Arms Watchkeepers Pool and live overseas.
I have read the TA pages, but not found anything about serving oversea's. That would be a great solution. Could you point me in the direction of more information?
 
#10
Have you thought about doing some charity work? Or learning a new language? I take it you can speak Norwegian so learning another language would be quite easy!!
 
#11
the_matelot said:
Have you thought about doing some charity work? Or learning a new language? I take it you can speak Norwegian so learning another language would be quite easy!!
I learnt French prior to taking a holday in France a couple of years ago, but you have to live in a country to really get fluent, and understand all dialects, nuances and slang. C'est la vie.

I am involved in voluntary work also, my frustration I think is that everything is so predicatable. Get up at sparrows fart, go to work, work too long. Eat dinner, then either: voluntary work, rehab on house (most evenings), go running/training up a mountain (skiing in winter), if I'm lucky time to meet a few friends - all according to the day of the week.

Its not just that - it's the army I miss. (boo hoo, I'm doing my best to get over it!)
 
#12
Get yourself qualified as amountaineering/skiing instructor and open an adventure training/outward bound school. No point having regrets, you'll get far more satisfaction from passing on your skills to others.
 
#13
sniper_bob said:
Get yourself qualified as amountaineering/skiing instructor and open an adventure training/outward bound school. No point having regrets, you'll get far more satisfaction from passing on your skills to others.
Cracking suggestion sniper_bob - we even have a ski centre here where I live. I have also wondered about running amountain hotel.

I have now found the All Arms Watchkeepers' and Liaison Officers' Group TA pages, and am (as we speak!) writing to them. I'll see how that goes first.
 
#14
phibeck... if I may.......... it sounds like to you need a change or something new in your life... you are perhaps combining the unpredictability of life with the Army and looking through, dare I sight it, rose tinted spectacles. Linking fun and the Army for you may not be right.

I suggest.. take up another passion... more holidays..... trips abroad... and do something new rather think about being connected with the Army again.... the level you could join at and the jobs you could do would never be like it was serving as a young officer many years ago.

I wish the very best of luck mon brave !!
 
#15
Ramillies said:
phibeck... if I may.......... it sounds like to you need a change or something new in your life... you are perhaps combining the unpredictability of life with the Army and looking through, dare I sight it, rose tinted spectacles. Linking fun and the Army for you may not be right.

I suggest.. take up another passion... more holidays..... trips abroad... and do something new rather think about being connected with the Army again.... the level you could join at and the jobs you could do would never be like it was serving as a young officer many years ago.

I wish the very best of luck mon brave !!
Wise words, and you are probably correct. I think it lies in that I've done a lot of things right and well in my life, but didn't give the Army my best shot. It niggles me that I don't feel I put in a good effort.

As most civi's my job is very office-bound, apart from going out to the assembly hangars where our subsea wells are assembled a couple of times a week. So the rose tinted glasses tend to be focused on going out on excercise etc. I am following up the TA abroad lead, and hope that that might enable me to combine reality (everyday life) with DPA life.

Failing that, I'll have to think things through, because I am getting very frustrated with the predictability of every day life!
 
#16
phibeck said:
Ramillies said:
phibeck... if I may.......... it sounds like to you need a change or something new in your life... you are perhaps combining the unpredictability of life with the Army and looking through, dare I sight it, rose tinted spectacles. Linking fun and the Army for you may not be right.

I suggest.. take up another passion... more holidays..... trips abroad... and do something new rather think about being connected with the Army again.... the level you could join at and the jobs you could do would never be like it was serving as a young officer many years ago.

I wish the very best of luck mon brave !!
Wise words, and you are probably correct. I think it lies in that I've done a lot of things right and well in my life, but didn't give the Army my best shot. It niggles me that I don't feel I put in a good effort.

As most civi's my job is very office-bound, apart from going out to the assembly hangars where our subsea wells are assembled a couple of times a week. So the rose tinted glasses tend to be focused on going out on excercise etc. I am following up the TA abroad lead, and hope that that might enable me to combine reality (everyday life) with DPA life.

Failing that, I'll have to think things through, because I am getting very frustrated with the predictability of every day life!

My understanding of the All Watchkeepers Pool is that the commitment is 1 x 2 week 'camp' on attachment to your affiliated HQ (generally for a major ex) plus a small number (2-3?) of weekends (currently at Woolwich?) a year. Total of 19 days per year. So, even if you live in Norway, you should be able to make that. I may be out of date, but having spoken to some of the guys in the pool, there is a really eclectic mix of long term TA and ex-Regulars. There is plenty of scope for mobilisation, should you want to revisit that part of the military experience too.

As with all things military, once you're back in the 'club', there is plenty of scope to use your climbing experience and location to your advantage with units undertaking adv trg.

Good luck.
 
#17
Most specialist units don't require the same sort of commitment (in time) as other units, so you could live abroad and attend the training, etc. I think they even pay you to travel. I know of members of the TA living in Holland, which is why I suggested the TA.

Sorry to hear about your daughter, and of course you can only do one thing in that position.

What about setting up a ski lodge or similar and aiming towards military parties?
 
#18
chocolate_frog said:
Most specialist units don't require the same sort of commitment (in time) as other units, so you could live abroad and attend the training, etc. I think they even pay you to travel. I know of members of the TA living in Holland, which is why I suggested the TA.

Sorry to hear about your daughter, and of course you can only do one thing in that position.

What about setting up a ski lodge or similar and aiming towards military parties?
I really didn't know that members of the TA could live abroad. I thought I had read all of the TA pages thoroughly - I will go through them again. Thanks for the tip. Thats 2 tips including the one about the Watchkeeper Pool. Ace, thats 2 positive leads more than I was counting on. I expected only flack! Thanks lads.

One of the interesting things I did in BAOR was run a Regimental skilodge down in Bavaria (Uberjoch). That suggestion of yours (ski lodge) falls in with other thoughts I have had about running a mountain hotel (they are very based on skiing tourism), though I had thought to wait until later in life.

I'm not sure angling towards squaddie clientel is such a good idea, unless I would be prepared to replace tables and chairs, put out fires, defumegate the rooms, and use a high-pressure hose on the bar area every day!

I'm going to check the TA pages again. Cheers mate.
 
#19
I look back on my army career with wistful affection although I retired in the mid 1980s.

I suspect though what you're experiencing is a mid-life crisis (how weel I ken!). There's no turning the clock back, consider instead looking up contemporaries from your army days via your regiment's officers' club. Not only will they be on the same wave length as you it might just give closure to your time in the army.

Good luck.
 
#20
Busterdog said:
I look back on my army career with wistful affection although I retired in the mid 1980s.

I suspect though what you're experiencing is a mid-life crisis (how weel I ken!). There's no turning the clock back, consider instead looking up contemporaries from your army days via your regiment's officers' club. Not only will they be on the same wave length as you it might just give closure to your time in the army.

Good luck.
Wonder if you're right old fruit - I should have seen the writing on the wall when I married a filly 15 years my junior a couple of years ago. (1st wife died 10 years previously - so no dodgy stuff). I am going to actively pursue the Watchkeepers and TA specialist thing.

It's not that I haven't got enough to do, I'm too bl**dy busy all the time - I'm fed up that I have to do the same things all the time.

If The TA thing dosn't work out, then I will definately look at things. Perhaps a job whcih pays less, but is a lot more fun, and gets me out of the faffing office! (Wonder if thats the real trouble?) And does such a job exist ??

Anyway mate, thanks for your comments, I feel better just having written about it. (Ah SH!T! I'll be hugging a tree next !!!)
 

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