Food rationing in USA

#1
Yes, you read it right. In the land of gluttony, excess, and the XXXXXXXXXXL waistline, food rationing has struck:

NY Sun

If it can happen in the USA -- a country with considerable agricultural resources -- then it can happen here, for the UK is a net importer of food and the last in the supply line in Europe (apart from Eire) as far as geography goes.

Does anyone know where I can buy a job lot of spam?

Edited to add another link:

Wall Street Journal
 
#3
SPAM, Specially Processed American meat.
Quite nice fried between two big thick slices of toast.
john
It's water that will really start wars, lok what China is doing to the Mekong.
 
#4
Sure, my house is all of ten miles from Mountain View. Let me check with the wife, but she's not said anything about going hungry that I noticed.

NTM
 
#5
jonwilly said:
SPAM, Specially Processed American meat.
Quite nice fried between two big thick slices of toast.
john
It's water that will really start wars, lok what China is doing to the Mekong.
Eh? Listen Foriegn Devil the Mekong is Chinese water! If you want water make your own!
 
#7
hong_kong_fuey said:
Yes, you read it right. In the land of gluttony, excess, and the XXXXXXXXXXL waistline, food rationing has struck:

NY Sun

If it can happen in the USA -- a country with considerable agricultural resources -- then it can happen here, for the UK is a net importer of food and the last in the supply line in Europe (apart from Eire) as far as geography goes.

Does anyone know where I can buy a job lot of spam?

Edited to add another link:

Wall Street Journal
A vast difference between the US and Ireland/ UK is distence of travel, if the worst happenes, we have plenty of arable land and short supply chains to the cities, we may have to forgo our now used to, guava's and and kiwi's, but we will survive, the US, they have vast area's to travel though to get to the cities to supply, and in some states, not a whole lot of arable land for growing produce.....we may look back on the wine lakes and butter mountians fondly in the future
 
#8
I've got a pallet of ORP in the MHE Shed, best I hide it away from prying eyes then.
 
#9
The Mekong is one seriously f-d up river.
Dams are drying up the river and eventually it is thought the sea will flow that far up river to destroy China's old enemy, The Viet, for the delta will no longer be able to supply the rice required to feed Nam.
john
 
#10
I think this is overstated. I shop several times a week for my family and haven't detected any shortages of any food products that you could classify as "staples" or "basics." This so-called problem may be overstated in the article. (I live in Eugene, Oregon.) Costco probably isn't the best place to try and judge this sort of thing since it's a wholesale chain.

cheers, Mark
 
#11
This is b0llocks.

1. Yes, the world price of rice is rising but right now in the US it retails about 50 cents a pound and is one of the cheapest foods available. American consumers aren't going to kick up a fuss about paying an extra dime a pound.

2. The US produces twice as much rice as it consumes. There's plenty of it about.

3. On the other hand, Costco/ Sam's Club etc. rely on memberships for most of their revenue, their profit margins on sales are pretty tight. It's all about getting people to start buying memberships. How do you do that? By making some headlines that indicates that the food is getting scarce and the price is increasing. "Buy in bulk here, folks and it's much cheaper than your local supermarket. To make sure you all get what you need, we're going to limit you to only one 30lb bag at a time." (Think about it- what household goes through a 30lb bag of rice in a week?)
 
#12
Crabtastic said:
This is b0llocks.
And I concur.
Given that I eat food every day I go to supermarkets in a Boston suburb regularly and there are absolutely no signs of any shortages or rationing. i just got back from a Florida supermarket (down here for a couple of weeks of R&R and the larder of my Florida place was empty) and there were absolutely no signs of shortages here. Gasoline is up to about $3.45 per gallon but other than that noting seems that pricey.

Someone has an overactive imagination I think.
 
#13
Busterdog said:
You sound pleased h_k_f Denied an entry visa?
Excuse me? That's a warped conclusion you've come to. I most certainly am not pleased. Shouldn't have dignified you with a response. And with no criminal record or links to unsavoury groups, apart from Arrse, I shouldn't have a problem getting an entry visa. Regardless, I prefer Canada...it's generally much nicer.
 
#14
And dont forget that after the New Orleans disaster & the UK & Holland sent tons of surplus rat packs,they sat in a wharehouse until the US Gov destroyed them.
 
#15
Costco is a warehouse wholesale supplier that also allows non bussiness customers to shop in there warehouse/stores if they have a membership card.

They leverage there massive size into getting lowest prices from producers and if they dont get a price they consider low enough they simply dont buy. Report indicated shortage was of Indian produced rice that was being sold for 20$ for a ten pound bag. That prices is far above the price charged for American produced rice.

In this case Costco almost certainly simply stopped buying overpriced Indian rice. People that wanted Indian rice for flavor are other reasons cant go down to Costco and buy it anymore. But Costco im sure has sevral massive pallets of American rice sitting in its warehouse/stores just waiting to be bought at a much lower price.

America is a massive food exporting nation if America was really haveing food shortages many parts of rest of world would be dieing from famine.
 
#16
It may be food to most people but to the World Stock Markets its just a commodity traded on the Futures market. It is very easy to buy Options on foodstuffs and find they dont exist months down the line when it comes to delivery in the real world.
If you think the banks have made a Bollks of the Building industry just wait untill you see the coming disaster in Farming.
Best start hiding the Spam now!
 
#17
petergriffen said:
hong_kong_fuey said:
Yes, you read it right. In the land of gluttony, excess, and the XXXXXXXXXXL waistline, food rationing has struck:

NY Sun

If it can happen in the USA -- a country with considerable agricultural resources -- then it can happen here, for the UK is a net importer of food and the last in the supply line in Europe (apart from Eire) as far as geography goes.

Does anyone know where I can buy a job lot of spam?

Edited to add another link:

Wall Street Journal
A vast difference between the US and Ireland/ UK is distence of travel, if the worst happenes, we have plenty of arable land and short supply chains to the cities, we may have to forgo our now used to, guava's and and kiwi's, but we will survive, the US, they have vast area's to travel though to get to the cities to supply, and in some states, not a whole lot of arable land for growing produce.....we may look back on the wine lakes and butter mountians fondly in the future
We had to enact the Grain laws during the Napoleonic wars because of food shortages due to reduced imports. The population then was what? 25-30million.

In 1942 the population was 40 million but the convoys weren't just bringing war materiel.

UK population now is circa 60 million. We wouldn't be that well off.
 
#18
spike7451 said:
And dont forget that after the New Orleans disaster & the UK & Holland sent tons of surplus rat packs,they sat in a wharehouse until the US Gov destroyed them.
What's this? We sent Aid and the US Gov goes and destroys it? I never heard of that, if it's true, I am quite outraged
 
#19
EX_STAB said:
We had to enact the Grain laws during the Napoleonic wars because of food shortages due to reduced imports. The population then was what? 25-30million.

In 1942 the population was 40 million but the convoys weren't just bringing war materiel.

UK population now is circa 60 million. We wouldn't be that well off.
Back in the 1800's wheat yields were 1.5-2 tons an acre. It was around 2 in 1940. Now people are regularly getting 4-5, with 6 not unheard of. That's all thanks to better plant breeding, pesticides and artificial fertilisers.

If we ended up in a siege economy, we can produce enough pesticides and fertiliser to get by (I know we import a lot, but the basics would be enough to keep yields up). Ploughing up all the land currently wasted by the horseracing industry, and golf courses, might help, too (spotted my prejudices, anyone? :twisted: ). When I was at Ag college 20 years ago, the price of bread wheat was £120/ton. It dropped below that before 1990, and it's only risen above that level in the last 12 months.

Control our borders to keep the population stable and we'll do just fine on our island. Globally, if we allow the market to sort out the price of food I think everyone else will be fine too. As I remember reading, the US gave up large-scale agriculture in eastern states like New York, once the Great Plains were opened up. They've got plenty of land available if the price rises sufficiently to make it worthwhile.

Distribution to really poor people is a problem, but as no-one in the West wants an influx of 1 billion poor easterners, I think we're bright enough to come up with a solution for that one, too.
 
#20
spike7451 said:
And dont forget that after the New Orleans disaster & the UK & Holland sent tons of surplus rat packs,they sat in a wharehouse until the US Gov destroyed them.
Looks like Spike's spellchecker is more familiar with "whorehouse" than "warehouse". :D
 

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