Food banks

Mbongwe

War Hero
quite simply becasue the previous scheme s were wide open to abuse as well as being a scenario where people have ever growing debt to the 'emergency loan' fund ...
DWP Crisis Loans and Hardship Funds etc. certainly were open to abuse especially from "regular borrowers"; however, now there's this parallel infrastructure that hands out free food no-questions-asked in many cases. I don't think there's any easy answer, but these food banks definitely are supporting irresponsible lifestyles in many instances.
 
I was on Mauritius a few years back. A staple there is dhal. Opened my eyes as to variety.

Cauliflower also curries very well indeed.

We'll ignore for a moment the abomination that is cauliflower rice.

Knew an Indian bloke that lived on my wing back in my old battalion who used to cook a variety of vegetable dhals all the time. Made a change from Fijian goat curries and for being absent meat it was delicious stuff.

My wife like that cauli-rice btw, the freak.
 

HendrixGin

Clanker
Prompted by this thread I’ve read the most recent (pre-Covid) reports by both the Social Metrics Commission (SMC) and Trussel Trust. The latter run 1,200 food banks across the UK.

Worth a gander, as they shed light on how food poverty effects different groups and the impact of accommodation rent/mortgage on poverty as a whole. Let’s take it as understood that there are those who deliberately or otherwise abuse the system; but these reports suggest that the reality of who uses food banks and the reasons why, is different to the usual assumptions and that a wide range of solutions is required.

According to the Trussell Trust, the greatest no. of users of food banks are lone single parents (900,000 in poverty), single men and women (3.3 million, in poverty). The majority being in the 16-24 age group. The biggest drivers for people using food banks based on their situation, are homelessness, illness or having a disability. The definition of ‘Homlessness’ includes living in shelters/hostels/B&B/‘sofa surfing’.

The Social Metrics Commission identify around 4.4 million people who fall below the poverty threshold as disabled under the equalities act. 50% of families in poverty having at least one adult or child with a disability.

The largest financial reasons given for using food banks appear to be waiting for the first the Universal Credit payment and a shortfall in available cash after paying accommodation costs. Individuals or families experiencing poverty using a food bank are often impacted by more than one factor. For instance a single teenage mum leaving home may be ‘homeless’, caring for a child with a disability, and also one of the 20% in poverty with no formal qualifications. On top of which she’s waiting for her first Universal Credit payment.

16% of those using food banks have suffered a bereavement. Losing either a partner or parent/guardian from their household whose income or benefits supported them.

There are no simple off the peg answers. Instead we need a bank of short, long term and even life-long solutions. Simply building more factories, shopping centres, superstores, distribution hubs or call centres is not going to resolve the overall issue. More traditional jobs however productive, won’t help those who are carers or have small children, who can only work part-time or sporadically as a result. It also won’t help those who are unable to work due to a disability. Some of the solutions lie in diverse areas such as education, skills, life-long learning, family mediation, accommodation/housing, resilience, expectations and culture change.
 
Prompted by this thread I’ve read the most recent (pre-Covid) reports by both the Social Metrics Commission (SMC) and Trussel Trust. The latter run 1,200 food banks across the UK.

Worth a gander, as they shed light on how food poverty effects different groups and the impact of accommodation rent/mortgage on poverty as a whole. Let’s take it as understood that there are those who deliberately or otherwise abuse the system; but these reports suggest that the reality of who uses food banks and the reasons why, is different to the usual assumptions and that a wide range of solutions is required.

According to the Trussell Trust, the greatest no. of users of food banks are lone single parents (900,000 in poverty), single men and women (3.3 million, in poverty). The majority being in the 16-24 age group. The biggest drivers for people using food banks based on their situation, are homelessness, illness or having a disability. The definition of ‘Homlessness’ includes living in shelters/hostels/B&B/‘sofa surfing’.

The Social Metrics Commission identify around 4.4 million people who fall below the poverty threshold as disabled under the equalities act. 50% of families in poverty having at least one adult or child with a disability.

The largest financial reasons given for using food banks appear to be waiting for the first the Universal Credit payment and a shortfall in available cash after paying accommodation costs. Individuals or families experiencing poverty using a food bank are often impacted by more than one factor. For instance a single teenage mum leaving home may be ‘homeless’, caring for a child with a disability, and also one of the 20% in poverty with no formal qualifications. On top of which she’s waiting for her first Universal Credit payment.

16% of those using food banks have suffered a bereavement. Losing either a partner or parent/guardian from their household whose income or benefits supported them.

There are no simple off the peg answers. Instead we need a bank of short, long term and even life-long solutions. Simply building more factories, shopping centres, superstores, distribution hubs or call centres is not going to resolve the overall issue. More traditional jobs however productive, won’t help those who are carers or have small children, who can only work part-time or sporadically as a result. It also won’t help those who are unable to work due to a disability. Some of the solutions lie in diverse areas such as education, skills, life-long learning, family mediation, accommodation/housing, resilience, expectations and culture change.
An excellent post, things aren't as simple as headlines (or prejudices!) suggest.
 

HendrixGin

Clanker
An excellent post, things aren't as simple as headlines (or prejudices!) suggest.
Thanks.

I think we are all subject to the negative stories. MSM does its thing, to divide and create clicks/revenue through sound-bites highlighting the cases that get your blood boiling over the genuinely needy.

Many of us also have knowledge of or know people who are playing the system. I do. It grates, yes, but I still donate. My wife and I have always built resilience into our lives, even then factors can combine suddenly to put the wolf at your door.
 
You can spot the middle class kids because they have named types of food instead of brands.
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NVA Raindrop

Clanker
A few years ago I put up a link showing British soldiers using food banks, I doubt they had a doctors note.
It's also highly doubtful smackheads living on the street are going to bother going through the correct channels either. Even someone who has suddenly lost their job is unlikely to know who to see to get proof just to claim free food.
Food banks like to say there is a criteria (you must be refered) because they are trying to deflect criticism that any lazy **** will turn up if you give them free stuff.
Won't the smackheads just sell the bags of food for crack money anyway? And who is buying bags of Starbucks coffee off a junkie who regularly robs the one I frequent?
 

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