Fly to work in a Spitfire?

#61
To me swapping out the guts detracts from the value. It'd still be a working aircraft but I'd try to keep it as original as possible with easily removable avionics packages and the bare minimum of changes to make it legal to fly.

Same reason it boils my piss when people 'sporterise' a Lee Enfield. I think the history is as important as the airframe.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#62
I half remembered that some Bf109s had been hacked about a bit after the war, but didn't know that the Spaniards built a dozens of Bf109-based aircraft with surplus Merlins!

Hispano Aviación HA-1112 - Wikipedia

Not only that, but they did the same thing with the Heinkel 111 design too.

CASA 2.111 - Wikipedia

The BF109 copy first flew with a Merlin in 1954. That's three years later than the Hawker Hunter's first flight in 1951, and the same year it entered RAF service.

The He111 design was into 1956 before it got the Merlins. The Canberra first flew in 1949.

Granted, Spain didn't have a great aerial adversary, but at the time when the UK was developing Hunters and Canberras, Spain was producing these. Like comparing a musket with a Bren.
I think most of them appeared in the Battle of Britain (where Galland apparently gave all the Spanish pilots a bollocking for being too timid in the action sequences!).
 
#63
To me swapping out the guts detracts from the value. It'd still be a working aircraft but I'd try to keep it as original as possible with easily removable avionics packages and the bare minimum of changes to make it legal to fly.

Same reason it boils my piss when people 'sporterise' a Lee Enfield. I think the history is as important as the airframe.
By working aircraft I am only referring to being flown regularly, not so much about its guts. I fully agree about keeping as much original as possible, but mustangs are the most butchered up warbird flying these days. The best as found and not modified I have worked on are FG-1D Corsairs, one even still had the original yellow/green primer on the inside of the fuselage.
96C9B06F-27D9-4810-8FAD-188CAEB64AFB.jpeg
 
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#64
I flew a Dak that still had the old Navy hydraulic autopilot. Someone had buggered about with the plumbing so that once switched on it would work fine for ten minutes while it pissed all the 5606 overboard. You'd see the rudder pedals start twitching until it got to a point they were yawing the ship all over the shop and heading would begin to drift (alt hold was a matter of trimming correctly).

First time round we found out the hard way that we had low fluid when we tried to get the gear down. Fortunately the flying spanner had a drum of it in the back and he topped us up for landing. Never did find out where all the fluid went when we engaged AP.
 
#65
I half remembered that some Bf109s had been hacked about a bit after the war, but didn't know that the Spaniards built a dozens of Bf109-based aircraft with surplus Merlins!
Hispano Aviación HA-1112 - Wikipedia
Not only that, but they did the same thing with the Heinkel 111 design too.
CASA 2.111 - Wikipedia
The BF109 copy first flew with a Merlin in 1954. That's three years later than the Hawker Hunter's first flight in 1951, and the same year it entered RAF service.
The He111 design was into 1956 before it got the Merlins. The Canberra first flew in 1949.
Granted, Spain didn't have a great aerial adversary, but at the time when the UK was developing Hunters and Canberras, Spain was producing these. Like comparing a musket with a Bren.
HA-1112 at Duxford in July 2015:

IMG_0647.jpg
 
#66
I flew a Dak that still had the old Navy hydraulic autopilot. Someone had buggered about with the plumbing so that once switched on it would work fine for ten minutes while it pissed all the 5606 overboard. You'd see the rudder pedals start twitching until it got to a point they were yawing the ship all over the shop and heading would begin to drift (alt hold was a matter of trimming correctly).

First time round we found out the hard way that we had low fluid when we tried to get the gear down. Fortunately the flying spanner had a drum of it in the back and he topped us up for landing. Never did find out where all the fluid went when we engaged AP.
It wasn’t this R4D was it? I did the import on it and it still had the autopilot installed, but was N/S and locked out.
59CDB518-1E18-4D68-AEF5-672B62591CE6.jpeg
 
#67
Nope, ex SAAF. ZS-NTE if the old meat computer still has some valid storage.



I flew her when she still had this colour scheme.



Old AP in the middle of the panel. Think this is her...

 
#68
Nope, ex SAAF. ZS-NTE if the old meat computer still has some valid storage.



I flew her when she still had this colour scheme.



Old AP in the middle of the panel. Think this is her...

This is the cockpit after we overhauled it, I didn’t take before pics.
2E95AE49-3678-4740-90BE-51E694F4A732.jpeg
I’m guessing your yoke didn’t have fun buttons like these and your side window didn’t have one of these mounted.....
E133FC52-F5F8-4EA9-9785-1D412F1E8ADD.jpeg
 
#69
Nope, old style yokes. Windows on the side were for scribbling on in chinagraph.

Is that Puff?
 
#70
Nope, old style yokes. Windows on the side were for scribbling on in chinagraph.

Is that Puff?
In a round about way, I suppose. We did all the conversion work to mount gatlings, but did not provide the weapons themselves. Our client being a US government dept, we didn’t ask any questions, but found it interesting we had to supply a second complete set of placards in Spanish.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#71
#75
Ah, OK. Got an idea who they may be.
The end user had 5 by the time I moved on to different endeavours, but one was brought down by the opposition with the crew being dispatched via machetes. Aircraft was recovered and rebuilt to flying state, but not outfitted to carry out previous role.
 
#78
I was just reading this thread, and thinking of the evocative tone of a Merlin, when I heard/felt another one close to my heart. The dulcet tones of twin 3-blade rotors that can only be a CH-47 Chinook. Looked out the door, and there she was, transiting along the lake. I'd pay good money for one more trip in one of these babies:

14606070366_9cb4d29d79_b.jpg


Especially that particular one!
 
#79
By working aircraft I am only referring to being flown regularly, not so much about its guts. I fully agree about keeping as much original as possible, but mustangs are the most butchered up warbird flying these days. The best as found and not modified I have worked on are FG-1D Corsairs, one even still had the original yellow/green primer on the inside of the fuselage.
I get a nice warm feeling when I see a Corsair, I particularly like the non-birdcage version. They look a little ungainly on the ground but once airborne they just look right and appeal to the inner aeronaut. Same goes with the Spitfire and the P-51D (not the earlier P-51 versions). I look at the Titan Mustang and okay I can see that its functional and the owner probably has a bundle of fun with it but its proportions just don't trigger the quickening.

Some time ago I was part of a group that looked into building replica, full size Spitfires including the engines. All fell apart when the money men fell out about who spilled who's pint or something of that ilk; idiots and an opportunity missed. It wouldn't have been an original 1940s aircraft but it would have flown as if it had just rolled out of Castle Bromwich.
 
#80
I was just reading this thread, and thinking of the evocative tone of a Merlin, when I heard/felt another one close to my heart. The dulcet tones of twin 3-blade rotors that can only be a CH-47 Chinook. Looked out the door, and there she was, transiting along the lake. I'd pay good money for one more trip in one of these babies:

View attachment 327468

Especially that particular one!
You get a better view...
...in a Sioux.
 

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