Floods- Send the army?

#1
People on the news are saying the army should also be sent in, to assist the emergency services. What about the manpower?...Has the army got the resources for this?

Typical, no one cares about the army, but when a crisis happens people suddenly turn and start yearning for the army to be called in.
 
#2
Until they start giving a flying f@ck about the forces, why should the forces help out. Lets see if Ashtead gets any flooding and watch them come running then. Plus is there anyone spare to do this, I doubt it very much, a bit busier elsewhere.
 
#3
Already helping out in Worcestershire etc, heard on 5 live this morning that there are two soldiers missing in that neck of the woods, lets hope they are just cut off in some village somewhere with no comms.
 
#4
30SR succesfully deployed 12 lads for a guided tour of the West Midlands motorway network before being sent home so the TA could take the glory yesterday. TA Sig Regts are deployed in the Midlands.
 
#5
Daily Hate

As the emergency services struggled to cope, and shops in affected areas said they were running out of staple foods, the Territorial Army was called in to offer logistical support, manpower, vehicles and helicopters.
Fcuk me, where did the TA get helicopters from? Afghanistan?
 
#6
Alas, the Forces have been cut back so much that they are probably only able to help on a limited basis. Or it is the responsiblity of the TA and dedicated rescue units.

Hope the two mias are found soon, safe and well.

This country as a whole needs to start looking at our emergency responses and our equipment.

These floods and similar are happening all to frequently. Time to bring back Civil Defence?

I beleive (or so the news reported) that the RAF have rescued more people over the last 36 hours than they have in the last 30 years.
 
#7
Cow said:
Daily Hate

As the emergency services struggled to cope, and shops in affected areas said they were running out of staple foods, the Territorial Army was called in to offer logistical support, manpower, vehicles and helicopters.
Fcuk me, where did the TA get helicopters from? Afghanistan?
Oh, that'll be the HAC, popped out nad bought their own don't you know?
 
#8
Typical, no one cares about the army, but when a crisis happens people suddenly turn and start yearning for the army to be called in.[/quote]


The vast majority of the population do care about the forces but as they have there own lives to live are not constantly talking about it. I for one am disgustede at the way the government neglects the needs of HMF but there is very little I can do about it except what I have already done, vote against the present government. While I would dearly love to see al troops withdrawn from Iraq and Afghanistan I am not so naive as to think it would be an easy operation, there seems to be an attitude about that all that would be needed is to report to the nearest airport and climb on a plane.Like it or not, we are there now and can't just cut and run and leave our allies to sort out the mess.
 
#9
Lets go back 4-5 years. The fire brigade striked, just before Op Telic kicked off. Who covered the fire and rescue services?...of course, it was the army.

Now that was over pay obviously. Now my question is, everyone knows the army are overstrethed, literally hanging on a string. But should the fire brigade want to strike again, will they think of the army and the repercussions it will cause?. Or due to the commitments the army has, is it unlikely that the fire brigade unions will start another strike?

I wouldnt rule out another to be honest at some point in the future.
 
#12
Helped out during the Windsor floods in 1994. We evacuated all the civvies in the local area into camp, fed them kept them warm and dry while driving around sand bagging their homes. We were heroes for about a week then they went back to complaining about the noise of vehicles and early morning road runs again.
 

mysteron

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
Thanks for calling the British Army, I am sorry all of our personnel are busy right now, but your call is important to us......Your are number 112, 342 in the queue. [Plays "The British Grenadiers"], thanks for waiting, did you know that you can join the Army at www.armyjobs@mod.uk or if you would like to leave a message press one now..........


Thank you for calling the British Army, the person that you have called......is unavailable as they are deployed, on a career course or are on training to deploy to some godforsaken sh!thole on the whim of a Government that does not support us. If you leave your name, number and nature of crisis - we will get back to you after we have sorted everyone else's problems...........Thank you for calling.
 
#16
Brilliant, as so many have previously stated, lack of manpower and more serios commitments elswhere kind of puts an end to the army or forces as a whole from helping.
There is an army in Britain, all ready to be mobilised, albeit unwillingly, that fcuking army of unemployed, mobilise those scrotes to help out, or are they too busy fiddling out expense sheets and phoney insurance claims?
 
#17
Tommy
I went into a public-'ouse to get a pint o'beer,
The publican 'e up an' sez, "We serve no red-coats here."
The girls be'ind the bar they laughed an' giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an' to myself sez I:

O it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, go away";
But it's ``Thank you, Mister Atkins,'' when the band begins to play,
The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,
O it's ``Thank you, Mr. Atkins,'' when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,
They gave a drunk civilian room, but 'adn't none for me;
They sent me to the gallery or round the music-'alls,
But when it comes to fightin', Lord! they'll shove me in the stalls!

For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, wait outside";
But it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide,
The troopship's on the tide, my boys, the troopship's on the tide,
O it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide.

Yes, makin' mock o' uniforms that guard you while you sleep
Is cheaper than them uniforms, an' they're starvation cheap;
An' hustlin' drunken soldiers when they're goin' large a bit
Is five times better business than paradin' in full kit.

Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy how's yer soul?"
But it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll,
The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
O it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll.

We aren't no thin red 'eroes, nor we aren't no blackguards too,
But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;
An' if sometimes our conduck isn't all your fancy paints:
Why, single men in barricks don't grow into plaster saints;

While it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, fall be'ind,"
But it's "Please to walk in front, sir," when there's trouble in the wind,
There's trouble in the wind, my boys, there's trouble in the wind,
O it's "Please to walk in front, sir," when there's trouble in the wind.

You talk o' better food for us, an' schools, an' fires an' all:
We'll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.
Don't mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face
The Widow's Uniform is not the soldier-man's disgrace.

For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Chuck him out, the brute!"
But it's "Saviour of 'is country," when the guns begin to shoot;
An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please;
But Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool - you bet that Tommy sees!
 
#18
The civil authorites are fully aware that we are stretched (but not overstretched) and do not wish lumber us with additional burdens at this time.

They had tried to get the Legion of Frontiersmen on the Batphone but it would appear that despite the integral floatation aids that many members of the LOF possess, most of them are unable to swim, hence their conspicuous absence in the present flooding disaster. Strange as it may seem, elderly, obese, overseas qualified parachutists are not in great demand by the civil powers. (No doubt the LOF will claim the jump was aborted because of a waterlogged DZ).

To encourage their members to learn how to swim the LOF should present a LOF swimmers medal. This could be awarded for completing 50m breast stroke (that's swimming NOT rubbing the shiny bits of tin on their chests). They may not content with a mere medal so it might have to have a sexed up title such as "The Order of the Dolphin" or the "Amphibious Operations Cross"

Perhaps the members of ARRSE can assist in this regard by suggesting an appropriate design for the medal.
 
#19
eveyuk said:
Tommy
I went into a public-'ouse to get a pint o'beer,
The publican 'e up an' sez, "We serve no red-coats here."
The girls be'ind the bar they laughed an' giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an' to myself sez I:

O it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, go away";
But it's ``Thank you, Mister Atkins,'' when the band begins to play,
The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,
O it's ``Thank you, Mr. Atkins,'' when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,
They gave a drunk civilian room, but 'adn't none for me;
They sent me to the gallery or round the music-'alls,
But when it comes to fightin', Lord! they'll shove me in the stalls!

For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, wait outside";
But it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide,
The troopship's on the tide, my boys, the troopship's on the tide,
O it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide.

Yes, makin' mock o' uniforms that guard you while you sleep
Is cheaper than them uniforms, an' they're starvation cheap;
An' hustlin' drunken soldiers when they're goin' large a bit
Is five times better business than paradin' in full kit.

Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy how's yer soul?"
But it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll,
The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
O it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll.

We aren't no thin red 'eroes, nor we aren't no blackguards too,
But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;
An' if sometimes our conduck isn't all your fancy paints:
Why, single men in barricks don't grow into plaster saints;

While it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, fall be'ind,"
But it's "Please to walk in front, sir," when there's trouble in the wind,
There's trouble in the wind, my boys, there's trouble in the wind,
O it's "Please to walk in front, sir," when there's trouble in the wind.

You talk o' better food for us, an' schools, an' fires an' all:
We'll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.
Don't mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face
The Widow's Uniform is not the soldier-man's disgrace.

For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Chuck him out, the brute!"
But it's "Saviour of 'is country," when the guns begin to shoot;
An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please;
But Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool - you bet that Tommy sees!

ah this poem keeps creeping up again and i think it's becoming more and more relavant although i think the public do care about the armed forces they're just not educated enough about them. bring back the royal tournament!!....probably dont have the manpower now though :(
 
#20
I seem to recall when I was involved in civil aid to the community, as it was then called in AGAIs, the local authority was billed for our time and materiel costs. Surely the same happens here?