Flights of extraordinary rendition

#1
At the risk of one of the Mods censoring this or the CIA putting me down to be kidnapped what is your point of view on this subject? I personally think that if someone is guilty or something doesn't add up then I fully support whatever means are at our disposal to ensure that me and mine are kept safe and I for one thank those people who keep me and mine safe.

The motor mouth for Liberty Chakakhan (or whatever her name is) once again raises her head to criticise people who defend our freedom. Doesnt she realise that these same people are the ones who defend our right to have a democracy that she enjoys and in my opinion violates by spouting off all her cr4p.
 
#2
Link?
 
#3
PartTimePongo said:
Fcuk sorry havent the facility as am using a comp at work. It was the lead story in todays Mail on Sunday. If anyone can help out would appreciate it.
 
#6
FABLONBIFFCHIT said:
At the risk of one of the Mods censoring this or the CIA putting me down to be kidnapped what is your point of view on this subject? I personally think that if someone is guilty or something doesn't add up then I fully support whatever means are at our disposal to ensure that me and mine are kept safe and I for one thank those people who keep me and mine safe.

The motor mouth for Liberty Chakakhan (or whatever her name is) once again raises her head to criticise people who defend our freedom. Doesnt she realise that these same people are the ones who defend our right to have a democracy that she enjoys and in my opinion violates by spouting off all her cr4p.
Which is fine if you've got the right person. Who decides?
 
#7

Nehustan

On ROPS
On ROPs
#8
Firstly does a 'flight of extraordinary rendition' mean they have a small chamber orchestra providing the entertainment rather than the latest Hollywood film, very classy :wink:

More seriously, I think the crux of this is what question was asked by the liberty lass. If she did not ask a pertinent question, she may not have received the answer she wanted. I haven't read her initial letter, but the quality of a question denotes the quality of answer, ask any prosecuting barrister. For instance if she asked 'Did CIA planes that may have been used for rendition use the United Kingdom as a way station at any point in their journeys outbound from or inbound to the US?' it would get a different response to 'Was the United Kingdom used by CIA planes rendering people to secret prisons in Europe?'. As most of the prisons were to our east or, as also all the regions from which people were rendered I fail to see why they would fly them to blighty, just to fly them back. Faced with a badly thought out question, and possibly poorly phrased, she may have received an appropriate response.
 
#9
Rendition (extraordinary or otherwise) is illegal, immoral and counterproductive. Any intelligence gains will be offset by lives lost through terrorist activities for which support has been fuelled by rendition. If it is above-board and so useful, then why not deal with the captives under US law?

I am reminded of the incident below, and of Kafka's The Trial. By all means endorse this idiocy, but don't complain if - for whatever reason - the finger of suspicion points at you.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2806827.stm

Briton back home after FBI ordeal

A British pensioner falsely accused by the FBI of being one of America's most wanted men has arrived back in the UK.
Charity worker Derek Bond told a news conference at Heathrow he had come "close to the edge" during his ordeal.

The 72-year-old Bristol grandfather was arrested at gunpoint during a holiday to South Africa, and held in prison for three weeks, in a case of mistaken identity.

He repeated his furious criticism of the FBI for their lack of action during his time in prison, saying his opinion of the US authorities was "pretty low, I can tell you."

"A lot of the time I spent in South Africa was because they were vacillating and would not move to do anything," he said.

"My file went in the in-tray and nothing happened for a very long time...

"It was only when the media were alerted to this that something started to happen."

Although he had no criticism of the South African police, he said he nonetheless found it extremely hard to cope during his time awaiting extradition to the US.

"I just had this knot in my stomach... I was put into a large cell with murderers, rapists, drug addicts, and we were held in a cage.

Mrs Bond had had to cope alone while her husband was in prison
"My spirits just started to sink and sink and sink, I wondered at one stage if I was going to survive."

Mr Bond, who has previously threatened to sue the FBI, said this remained his position: "I think something must happen."

The couple's daughter Gillian Bond said: "The decision has to be his, but personally I hope he does.

"He has been through so much, we all have. It has been extremely hard for my mother, but that is nothing compared to what my father has been through.

"I should be happy this morning, but I am still just so angry about it all."

Watching the press conference, Mr Bond's solicitor Andrew Gregg said the pensioner would need a good rest.

DEREK BOND'S ORDEAL
Jan 27 Questioned on arrival in South Africa
Feb 6:Arrested at KwaZulu-Natal holiday village
Feb 10: Agreed to be extradited to US to clear his name
Feb 14: US authorities discover Mr Bond is claiming mistaken identity
Feb 25: US prosecutor tipped off about "real" Mr Sykes in Las Vegas
Feb 26: Mr Bond released

He said: "I'm thrilled for him, but he does look very tired - he doesn't look as well and as fit as he did before he left.

"He has obviously gone through a most harrowing ordeal, but it is good to see him back."

Mr Bond thanked the media for drawing attention to his case, but also complained bitterly about some of the intrusive "dirty tricks" used to get access to him.

He added that he had had a personal phone call from South African president Thabo Mbeki, who had apologised to him and invited him to tea if he ever returned to South Africa.

Mr Bond's wife Audrey, who had been on holiday with him, said she now hoped they could go home and be reunited with their children in peace.

Mr Bond had been mistaken by the FBI for their real wanted man, multi-million pound fraud suspect Derek Lloyd Sykes.

Mr Sykes, also a British citizen who is now in custody and awaiting trial in Texas, may have used the name Derek Bond as long as 14 years ago.

And Mr Bond's passport number had somehow been added to the FBI "wanted" notice about Mr Sykes, the news conference heard.

It was only when the case received publicity in the US, that the FBI received a tip-off from somebody who knew Mr Sykes, that he was arrested and Mr Bond released.

Mr Sykes, who denies the charges, is accused of involvement in a 1990s scam which cost 210 people more than £3million.
 
#10
The SNP are looking into these flights, which have used Edinburgh and Prestwick and I would be surprised if they haven't stopped over at Leuchars.

I wonder if these aircraft are monitored by the air defence system.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/glasgow_and_west/6739013.stm

SNP looks at 'rendition' evidence

The SNP government has said it is prepared to examine evidence that Scottish airports have been used by CIA "rendition flights".
First Minister Alex Salmond invited human rights groups to meet Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill on the issue.

The move came after a report by police chiefs concluded there was no evidence such flights had landed in England.

But their inquiry did not investigate allegations that CIA aircraft refuelled at Glasgow and Prestwick airports.

Human rights groups have claimed the CIA uses Scotland as a stop-off point as they carry terrorism suspects to secret prisons elsewhere in Europe, Africa and Asia, where they may face torture.

Speaking on the BBC's Politics Show, the first minister said any evidence presented to the government would be evaluated before a decision was taken on whether a full Scottish investigation should be carried out.

He added: "I would certainly invite the organisations, including Justice - the organisation which looks at civil liberties south of the border - to come and meet the justice secretary in Scotland and bring with them the evidence that causes them such concern.

"That's an invitation to all groups and organisations including our Scottish ones who have that concern.

"We will evaluate that information to see if the police inquiry south of the border looked at the Scottish case and the Scottish circumstances, evaluate that information we're given and then we'll proceed from there."

Mr Salmond also welcomed reports that UK justice minister Harriet Harman wanted international law changed so that foreign governments must notify another country when flying prisoners through its airspace.

"That's the sort of thinking I think will cause a great deal of relief to a number of people who have great concerns about this," he said.

The 18-month English inquiry was led by Michael Todd, chief constable of Greater Manchester Police, on behalf of the Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo).

It examined claims by human rights group Liberty that "extraordinary rendition" flights chartered by the US government through the CIA landed in the UK to refuel.

But a statement released by Acpo said Mr Todd had "concluded that there is indeed no evidence to substantiate Liberty's allegations."

Liberty said the report was a "whitewash" and pointed out Mr Todd had not examined the allegations surrounding Scottish airports.

Last year, a Foreign Office minister said that a rendition flight containing a detainee had landed at Prestwick Airport in June 1998.
 

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