Flightradar 24

Does regular civvy ATC control the military air or does the military have control?

I'd say it was squawking 7700 to rapidly climb out as it was flying quite a while after the 7700 and away from RAF Marham.
I've edited my post now. Flying at low level they may well have not been talking to anyone, but when climbing out (or wanting to climb out) of low level they wouldn't necessarily know precisely where they are, and ATC wouldn't have a scooby. Getting them to squawk 7700 highlights the contact on the controller's screen and thereby identifies the a/c position more easily/quickly, as well as alerting any ATC units in the area.

To answer your first question; mostly civil ATC, but in the 'open FIR' aka Class G airspace there is no control. If there's any controlled airspace around it is controlled by civil ATC, but there is military ATC co-located to help coordinate military aircraft in middle and upper, civil airspace. There's actually very, very little military airspace in the UK, and a lot of it isn't recognised by civilian traffic.
 
Does regular civvy ATC control the military air or does the military have control?...
As @CrashTestDummy mentions, it would initially depend on who, if anyone is controlling the aircraft. This could be a local tower, area radar, a CRC, a ship or an airborne platform such as an AWACS.

Tbh, I'd be very disappointed if any FJ aviator didn't know where they were to a very high degree of accuracy (although airspace busts do still happen). In this case, the F-35 was almost certainly working with either Marham or London and probably had a fairly innocuous issue. Climbing to medium altitude allows him work the problem and potentially discuss options with the flying supervisor and/or engineers.

On declaring an emergency and following initial coordination, the Distress and Diversion (D&D) cell will rapidly get involved and assume control if this is possible. D&D is manned by RAF ATC personnel in the Joint civil/military London Area Control Centre at Swanwick in Hampshire. D&D has access to a wide range of radar feeds and frequencies offers a variety of services across the entire UK FIR. Any aircraft squawking 7500/7600/7700/0030 or transmitting on 121.5/243.0 is immediately triangulated and displayed so that D&D staff can start communicating with the pilot and coordinating support such as diversions and - if necessary - SAR and emergency services.

This provides more information on D&D and they encourage visits from aircrew and controllers.

Regards,
MM
 
I've edited my post now. Flying at low level they may well have not been talking to anyone, but when climbing out (or wanting to climb out) of low level they wouldn't necessarily know precisely where they are, and ATC wouldn't have a scooby. Getting them to squawk 7700 highlights the contact on the controller's screen and thereby identifies the a/c position more easily/quickly, as well as alerting any ATC units in the area.

To answer your first question; mostly civil ATC, but in the 'open FIR' aka Class G airspace there is no control. If there's any controlled airspace around it is controlled by civil ATC, but there is military ATC co-located to help coordinate military aircraft in middle and upper, civil airspace. There's actually very, very little military airspace in the UK, and a lot of it isn't recognised by civilian traffic.
As @CrashTestDummy mentions, it would initially depend on who, if anyone is controlling the aircraft. This could be a local tower, area radar, a CRC, a ship or an airborne platform such as an AWACS.

Tbh, I'd be very disappointed if any FJ aviator didn't know where they were to a very high degree of accuracy (although airspace busts do still happen). In this case, the F-35 was almost certainly working with either Marham or London and probably had a fairly innocuous issue. Climbing to medium altitude allows him work the problem and potentially discuss options with the flying supervisor and/or engineers.

On declaring an emergency and following initial coordination, the Distress and Diversion (D&D) cell will rapidly get involved and assume control if this is possible. D&D is manned by RAF ATC personnel in the Joint civil/military London Area Control Centre at Swanwick in Hampshire. D&D has access to a wide range of radar feeds and frequencies offers a variety of services across the entire UK FIR. Any aircraft squawking 7500/7600/7700/0030 or transmitting on 121.5/243.0 is immediately triangulated and displayed so that D&D staff can start communicating with the pilot and coordinating support such as diversions and - if necessary - SAR and emergency services.

This provides more information on D&D and they encourage visits from aircrew and controllers.

Regards,
MM
Cheers for the information boys. I'm a total novice when it comes to most things aviation and especially ATC and the like but that's some useful info.

I'll do some more reading up on it. Thanks for the link to MM.
 
Cheers for the information boys. I'm a total novice when it comes to most things aviation and especially ATC and the like but that's some useful info.

I'll do some more reading up on it. Thanks for the link to MM.
@Magic_Mushroom is much more current and expert than me in that particular sphere. When I've required to climb out of low level I'd get climbed by ATC to a level equating to that which that F-35 was initialing operating. Even then I'd be suffering from a nose bleed :D

For a helicopter we'd tend to do the opposite; descend and probably make precautionary landing.
 
Ryanair are too tight to fail. All those hidden charges will keep them in the black.

“It’s free to breathe in but breathing out has a £50 surcharge.”
 
Flybmi goes down.
Another airline gone. Flybe apparently in trouble too & are banking on a merger with Virgin & Stobart to bail them out.
BBC’s renta travel mouth Simon Calder says it’s simple. ‘Too many seats & not enough passengers’.
Makes you wonder who’s next.


UK regional airline Flybmi ceases flights
Calder actively contributes to the problem by encouraging Wayne and Waynetta to complain that Xxx Air didn’t stock gluten free chicken nuggets on their flights despite the fact that Waynelet has ADHD etc and lead them to believe they are entitled to £4.1bn compo (holiday cost, 2 weeks Hotel Chlamydia, Benidorm, £299 all in).

There then follows a Facebook campaign, picked up by the Sunday Mirror, Sun and Mail, the stress causes Waynelet to take a knife to school / get a stupid haircut and be excluded and so on.

Airline relents, offers a goodwill gesture despite being under no contractural obligation to do so which is branded “disgustin’”, Calder intervenes as a columnist, gets his wedge and so on, family get free holiday to Barbados and go on to ruin holiday experience for 300 other people by being, well, the kind of people they are. 300 people complain and round goes the wheel.
 
Here's a quick look at the 744 painted in BAOC livery.


Currently on descent to Heathrow.
 
On declaring an emergency and following initial coordination, the Distress and Diversion (D&D) cell will rapidly get involved and assume control if this is possible.
I was the first Sergeant in the RAF to obtain a D&D (Emergency) validation (previously the minimum rank was Flt Sgt), ping me if you need more info :)
 
I love the wee icon of the Typhoon. Have they got them for most combat aircraft?
The app I use is a bit shit (it's an Android app called Freedar) but it seems to have correct silhouettes for most aircraft. You can tell what is a Hercules from a C17, a Hawk from a Typhoon.
 
The app I use is a bit shit (it's an Android app called Freedar) but it seems to have correct silhouettes for most aircraft. You can tell what is a Hercules from a C17, a Hawk from a Typhoon.
Is there anything comparable for an iPhone? I’m keen to catch a glimpse of the Tornados tomorrow as they head north from Leuchars; I’ll be at work, so only hope is to pop outside for a bit. In answer to my query whether they would show up on Flightradar24 I had the following reply from the Media & Comms Officer at RAF Lossie;

'The Tornados are fitted with a Mode S transponder, and as such they should be visible on Flight Radar 24 or any other site using ADS-B receivers. It will all be dependent on the coverage of these services, along with the altitude at which the aircraft are flying at the time. Keep in mind that there is a delay on these services so they may not be showing the aircraft's real time location.'

Anyone got any good advice on how best to catch the few seconds they will be overhead, since I’ll be surrounded by buildings?
 

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