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Flightradar 24

Saw a post the other day where so USA guy spotted 4 US Doomsday planes up. Usually behaviour?
I'm sorry, but that makes no sense whatsoever.
 

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Q codes (QNH, QFE etc) are all from WW2. The infrastructure for transmitting data between ATC in various countries has been creaking for a very long time. Almost everyone still uses a very simple standard message format OLDI (Online Data Interchange) between countries which only gives 3 message types with basic message data i.e. Callsign, beacon, time, level and squawk. Its much better than the previous telephoned coordination though! Even America is still working on improving comms data transmissions between its various ATC centres, they're all effectively mini countries.
The replacement is SWIM (System Wide Information Management) which everyone agrees is the dogs danglers, fantastic, marvellous, want it tomorrow until asked to put their hands in their pockets!

When I first joined the RAF it was ATC staff who worked out the slipperiness of the runway. We could do a braking test, drive a landrover down the runway and slam the anchors on. Alternatively you could measure the coefficient of friction using a mu meter. Basically a small trailer you hooked up to the landrover and drove it at 30mph down the runway. Which could be very entertaining if it hadn't been treated with anything, especially stopping at the end! SAAB produced a car with a 3rd wheel built in which dropped down to give a mu reading. I did ask if we could have one but MoD refused the request, cannot understand why :)
There are vast departments across the whole of Aviation tasked with TLA, FLA and MLA creation.

3, 4, Multiple letter abbreviations.

QNP is one often used, particularly in the aforementioned Trapper meets Trapee scenario.
 
As is SPPE, GPPE and SPGE.

Never GPGE. We’re talking Trappers after all.
 

Ritch

LE
Saw a post the other day where so USA guy spotted 4 US Doomsday planes up. Usually behaviour?

Yep. Sometimes there's six up at a time and people panic, thinking Armageddon is coming
 

Ritch

LE
Had a quick go on my Android flight sim morning. LHR to Moscow [D]

Flight report for the 15 minutes or so I flew.

Screenshot_20210116-105356_RFS.jpg
 
Q codes (QNH, QFE etc) are all from WW2. The infrastructure for transmitting data between ATC in various countries has been creaking for a very long time. Almost everyone still uses a very simple standard message format OLDI (Online Data Interchange) between countries which only gives 3 message types with basic message data i.e. Callsign, beacon, time, level and squawk. Its much better than the previous telephoned coordination though! Even America is still working on improving comms data transmissions between its various ATC centres, they're all effectively mini countries.
The replacement is SWIM (System Wide Information Management) which everyone agrees is the dogs danglers, fantastic, marvellous, want it tomorrow until asked to put their hands in their pockets!

When I first joined the RAF it was ATC staff who worked out the slipperiness of the runway. We could do a braking test, drive a landrover down the runway and slam the anchors on. Alternatively you could measure the coefficient of friction using a mu meter. Basically a small trailer you hooked up to the landrover and drove it at 30mph down the runway. Which could be very entertaining if it hadn't been treated with anything, especially stopping at the end! SAAB produced a car with a 3rd wheel built in which dropped down to give a mu reading. I did ask if we could have one but MoD refused the request, cannot understand why :)

Q codes predated WW1, they originated with some of the early CW radio systems to abbreviate complex messages eg QRK5 is much shorter than “the readability of your signal is perfect”. Given that for long range aircraft ops, they would have to use WT - ie Morse, it made sense to extend the Q-code series beyond radio procedures to include weather, runways, pressure etc. I don’t know if aviation uses Z-codes, but there are also a series of Z-codes, that were used extensively on RATT (teleprinter) circuits.

This thread deviation is reminding me of years ago on MAOTs sitting there listening to some stuffy bloke that sounded like he’d previously been narrating the Pathe Newsreels. ”This is Royal Air Force Volmet. Airfield colour states as at 1000Z - Abingdon Blue, Brize Norton Blue, Brüggen Yellow”. I think those ran for 15 minutes, then it would switch to a sequence of actual weather - “Wildrenrath - light rain, temperature one four, dew point one one, QNH one zero zero four decreasing, eight oktas“ etc. Being a Scaley, none of this made sense to me initially, but fair dos, the RAF team leaders would explain it. Then it became interesting hearing anomalies. UK could be clear weather, high pressure, all stations blue, then you’d hear “Waddington, black”. Someone had an oopsie at Waddo?

Thanks for taking me back thirty years!
 

ABNredleg

War Hero
Apologies, I was using voice to text.
E-2 Hawkeye has a tactical role and is not a strategic airborne command post - those are either converted 707 or 747 airliners. E-2s and E-3s are often used for high security events such as inaugurations and sporting events such as the Super Bowl. Undoubtedly there will be several in the air over DC on the 20th.
 
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