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Flightradar 24

BlipDriver

Swinger
Slight drift, but the discussion about the range of the Chinook reminded me of one night taking a call from Shannon about a flight from St John's in Newfoundland to Paderborn - in a single engine Cessna. The flight plan remarks had a comment of IIRC "27 hour flight", at 120kts.
 

Ritch

LE
Slight drift, but the discussion about the range of the Chinook reminded me of one night taking a call from Shannon about a flight from St John's in Newfoundland to Paderborn - in a single engine Cessna. The flight plan remarks had a comment of IIRC "27 hour flight", at 120kts.

Before COVID-19 came along and buggered everything up, I saw a Cessna on FlightRadar24 doing a trip from Goose Bay destined to Keflavik in Iceland. Looking at its flight history over the previous week, it had originated in Honolulu, transited to LA and then over the US.

I figured they must have fitted extra fuel tanks inside as it skipped the Icelandic stop and continued on to Prestwick.
There was a TV series about ferry flying a few years ago and a few times, two blokes would take small planes on mahoosive journeys, split into legs. The hairiest moments were the Atlantic crossings where they had to fly as high as possible to get the best range. One episode had one pilot go down with hypoxia mid-flight as his oxygen bottle had a leak in it. This left the rookie flying the plane, talking with ATC when in range and doing an emergency landing at a US base in Greenland.

It's not something I would fancy - being cramped inside a tiny plane, having to wear survival suits and hoping the oxygen canisters you're carrying don't go tits up.
 

BlipDriver

Swinger
It's not something I would fancy - being cramped inside a tiny plane, having to wear survival suits and hoping the oxygen canisters you're carrying don't go tits up.
Pretty much how we felt about it that night especially as the pilot hadn't filed the most direct route, but the route to minimise the route charges. We took pity on him & sent him off-route with an FIS service, knocking a couple of hours off.
 
When I last flew with BA, both pilots were either US or Canadian.

Speaking of the youngsters, I felt really gutted for some of the easyJet lot.

They'd been taken on by the firm, with some paying out up to £120,000 of loan or parents money for a licence with the definite promise of a job at the end of it only to get an email from management saying all bets were off, the youngsters were being fired and no money would be refunded.
That’s interesting you’ve picked up on that?

I’m working on this wearing my other hat and we are struggling to get the press interested as to be fair, it’s as much the Training Schools as it is the airlines. In fact, EZY (once pressured and in danger a PR nightmare) approached the CAA to try and sort something which they did. Sort of.

It centres on Base Training. The kids coming out of the schools have to go and fly some circuits in an empty aeroplane which was the airline’s part of the deal. No circuits = No Type Rating so an essentially useless licence.

The antics of some of the schools beggar belief. Some who are only part way through their training are seeing the writing on the wall and trying to bang out as realistically they’ve no chance of getting a job in the next few years as a) there are few jobs going and b) they are at the bottom of the list as lots of qualified pilots with huge experience are being made redundant. Schools are giving refunds but one case I’ve just seen was a guy who’d done about 20% of his training but got only 20% refund. They are taking the piss and hiding behind obscure small print.

Two students have formally declared bankruptcy. Many are funded by parents mortgaging their homes. There are a load more cases to come.

Could you give me your source please as it’ll be very helpful as we battle these profiteering bastards.
 
Slight drift, but the discussion about the range of the Chinook reminded me of one night taking a call from Shannon about a flight from St John's in Newfoundland to Paderborn - in a single engine Cessna. The flight plan remarks had a comment of IIRC "27 hour flight", at 120kts.

These guys are nutters. They do indeed have huge aux tanks fitted, sometimes to the extent of barely leaving room for them. The aircraft are ill equipped for the kind of navigation required and any sort of bad weather, particularly ice and they’re screwed.

They rarely carry anything meaningful in terms of survival kit and one I spoke to explained there was no point. He needed the weight saving for fuel and the fuel tank meant there was no way he’d get out in an emergency anyway.

We hear them occasionally on 123.45MHz, the chat International Air To Air frequency asking for wind and weather reports over the North Atlantic.
 
These guys are nutters. They do indeed have huge aux tanks fitted, sometimes to the extent of barely leaving room for them. The aircraft are ill equipped for the kind of navigation required and any sort of bad weather, particularly ice and they’re screwed.

They rarely carry anything meaningful in terms of survival kit and one I spoke to explained there was no point. He needed the weight saving for fuel and the fuel tank meant there was no way he’d get out in an emergency anyway.

We hear them occasionally on 123.45MHz, the chat International Air To Air frequency asking for wind and weather reports over the North Atlantic.

A mutual acquaintance of ours Bruce S once told me that he ferried a small single engine machine across the Atlantic when he was very hard up for cash - I think between his army service and a “proper“job. He got to the departure airfield to find he would be one of three pilots who would be flying as a formation as two of the aircraft had no nav kit or radios! I think he was given “take it or leave it and make your own way home” so he did the job. Can only imagine how stressful that journey was.
 
These guys are nutters. They do indeed have huge aux tanks fitted, sometimes to the extent of barely leaving room for them. The aircraft are ill equipped for the kind of navigation required and any sort of bad weather, particularly ice and they’re screwed.

They rarely carry anything meaningful in terms of survival kit and one I spoke to explained there was no point. He needed the weight saving for fuel and the fuel tank meant there was no way he’d get out in an emergency anyway.

We hear them occasionally on 123.45MHz, the chat International Air To Air frequency asking for wind and weather reports over the North Atlantic.
Why do they do it . . . ?!

Does it pay exceptionally well? Do they just like flying? Or, as you say, are they just nutters - with no other skills ;) .
 

Ritch

LE
That’s interesting you’ve picked up on that?

I’m working on this wearing my other hat and we are struggling to get the press interested as to be fair, it’s as much the Training Schools as it is the airlines. In fact, EZY (once pressured and in danger a PR nightmare) approached the CAA to try and sort something which they did. Sort of.

It centres on Base Training. The kids coming out of the schools have to go and fly some circuits in an empty aeroplane which was the airline’s part of the deal. No circuits = No Type Rating so an essentially useless licence.

The antics of some of the schools beggar belief. Some who are only part way through their training are seeing the writing on the wall and trying to bang out as realistically they’ve no chance of getting a job in the next few years as a) there are few jobs going and b) they are at the bottom of the list as lots of qualified pilots with huge experience are being made redundant. Schools are giving refunds but one case I’ve just seen was a guy who’d done about 20% of his training but got only 20% refund. They are taking the piss and hiding behind obscure small print.

Two students have formally declared bankruptcy. Many are funded by parents mortgaging their homes. There are a load more cases to come.

Could you give me your source please as it’ll be very helpful as we battle these profiteering bastards.

I don't have a source per se, I just follow an ex EZY pilot on social media who mentioned it, that's all. Wish I could be more help mate.
 
A mutual acquaintance of ours Bruce S once told me that he ferried a small single engine machine across the Atlantic when he was very hard up for cash - I think between his army service and a “proper“job. He got to the departure airfield to find he would be one of three pilots who would be flying as a formation as two of the aircraft had no nav kit or radios! I think he was given “take it or leave it and make your own way home” so he did the job. Can only imagine how stressful that journey was.
At the Scottish ATC Centre we got the Flight Plans on these, one roughly every other week. Far too low to worry any of the transatlantic aircraft, As the air emergency controller for the whole of Scotland I did think a few times what on earth I would do if one had a problem. The answer was pretty much nothing, we'd know because the satellites would pick up distress signals but too far for a chopper and no such thing as a boat style rescue service.
 
You could dispatch a Nimr... oh bugger.
 
Published by: By David Kaminski-Morrow, Flight Global, on 22 October 2020.

Ex-British Airways 747-400 to be preserved as UK film set.

One of British Airways’ recently-retired Boeing 747-400s is to be preserved as a film set at an airfield 40km south of London Heathrow.


The aircraft (G-CIVW), manufactured in 1998, was parked in March having served its entire commercial life with the UK operator.

It will be transferred on 22 October from Cardiff to the aerodrome at Dunsfold, which already has a modified ex-British Airways and Air Atlanta Europe 747-200 (G-BDXJ) that prominently featured in the 2006 film Casino Royale.

British Airways says the Rolls-Royce RB211-powered aircraft will be delivered to the airport upon arrival, and that it will retain the livery it carried in service.

“While [this 747] will no longer fly, the aircraft will be preserved and given a new lease of life in the world of TV and film, training and special events,” says Dunsfold aerodrome chief executive Jim McAllister.

British Airways says the aircraft will be used for “mock-up interior and exterior shots” and, in time, be opened as an exhibition for visitors.

It operated 11,424 cycles during its service, before being stored initially at Bournemouth and moved to Cardiff on 11 June.

Dunsfold, which serves as a heritage aviation park, has a single active runway of 1,880m, designated 07/25.

1603542601605.png

[photo: Source: Dunsfold Park. Ex-British Airways 747-400 G-CIVW arriving at Dunsfold].


Also posted on "british-airways-to-cut-12000-job" thread.
 

Ritch

LE
Published by: By David Kaminski-Morrow, Flight Global, on 22 October 2020.

Ex-British Airways 747-400 to be preserved as UK film set.

One of British Airways’ recently-retired Boeing 747-400s is to be preserved as a film set at an airfield 40km south of London Heathrow.


The aircraft (G-CIVW), manufactured in 1998, was parked in March having served its entire commercial life with the UK operator.

It will be transferred on 22 October from Cardiff to the aerodrome at Dunsfold, which already has a modified ex-British Airways and Air Atlanta Europe 747-200 (G-BDXJ) that prominently featured in the 2006 film Casino Royale.

British Airways says the Rolls-Royce RB211-powered aircraft will be delivered to the airport upon arrival, and that it will retain the livery it carried in service.

“While [this 747] will no longer fly, the aircraft will be preserved and given a new lease of life in the world of TV and film, training and special events,” says Dunsfold aerodrome chief executive Jim McAllister.

British Airways says the aircraft will be used for “mock-up interior and exterior shots” and, in time, be opened as an exhibition for visitors.

It operated 11,424 cycles during its service, before being stored initially at Bournemouth and moved to Cardiff on 11 June.

Dunsfold, which serves as a heritage aviation park, has a single active runway of 1,880m, designated 07/25.

View attachment 514659
[photo: Source: Dunsfold Park. Ex-British Airways 747-400 G-CIVW arriving at Dunsfold].


Also posted on "british-airways-to-cut-12000-job" thread.

This was it. Did a missed approach, a circuit and then landed.
 
A mutual acquaintance of ours Bruce S once told me that he ferried a small single engine machine across the Atlantic when he was very hard up for cash - I think between his army service and a “proper“job. He got to the departure airfield to find he would be one of three pilots who would be flying as a formation as two of the aircraft had no nav kit or radios! I think he was given “take it or leave it and make your own way home” so he did the job. Can only imagine how stressful that journey was.
That doesn’t surprise me. At all.

What does surprise me is that he did it, I’d credit him with more sense.

I (nearly) did one in a Malibu which was at least pressurised and had decent range and kit, it was full Airways equipped and brand new. The problem was the idiot “lead pilot” who had no idea about pressurisation, turbine engines or CS props. I was along as a favour / representative to the purchaser who I’d taught to fly who had promised to do the necessary training*. We got as far as Gander and I rang the purchaser and said either sack him and employ someone who knew what they were doing or buy me a ticket home**.

**He bought me a ticket as the lead was cheap (there was a reason for that, I’d not put money on him even having a licence).

*Matey reneged on his promise and like many others with big balls, big wallets and small brains took a one way ride to coffin corner. They never did confirm the cause of the accident but high altitude over speed followed by a reduction in the number of wings was most likely.
 
Why do they do it . . . ?!

Does it pay exceptionally well? Do they just like flying? Or, as you say, are they just nutters - with no other skills ;) .

When you’re skint....

In my limited experience, there’s a reason why some of the are skint.

There are some real pros about but they cost.
 
Interesting to se Saudi Medevac GV over Hull an hour earlier. On their way stateside to pick up or drop of wealthy well to do patient I imagine. Dealt with Saudi Medevac 2 decades ago for helicopter maintenance of their AS365N3.

cheers

0AA4F4C0-C8E7-4039-B995-E9318E6937D4.jpeg
 

Ritch

LE
Interesting to se Saudi Medevac GV over Hull an hour earlier. On their way stateside to pick up or drop of wealthy well to do patient I imagine. Dealt with Saudi Medevac 2 decades ago for helicopter maintenance of their AS365N3.

cheers

View attachment 514931

Aye they're always on the move between the Kingdom and the US - mainly the Mayo clinic in Minneapolis.
 

Ritch

LE
Last BA 747 at Cardiff has left for the scrappers at Newquay.

20201025_143322.jpg
 
Since few hours triple Quid ps gone out from EGUN to support POTUS coming over this side Of the Planet including NECAp. Apparently all the Presidents men are heading to India .

cheers

163FA9C0-8362-49E6-AC41-797EFEF4D86A.jpeg
11C470DF-AE3C-4C5C-9587-3C486E48ED65.jpeg
 

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