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Flightradar 24

It's often brought on by flying out of balance (not keeping the ball in the middle), such as the way students fly 90% of the time :rolleyes:

I was once teaching a baby Harrier pilot to hover in a Gz which you know hangs right skid low in the hover. Whenever I gave him control of the pedals he kept yawing to the right, after the first couple of minutes I suddenly twigged on - he was trying to get the ball in the middle...
 
Northern Ireland has that effect on everyone.
I enjoyed my time in the Emerald Toilet.

Well, the first two months out of 66 anyway.
 
I enjoyed my time in the Emerald Toilet.

Well, the first two months out of 66 anyway.

Spent half of my army career in NI. First three tours I thought the place was shit, then I did the best part of three years as a resident tourer, went outside the gate and loved the place. That’s probably why I live there now.
 

Ritch

LE
Spent half of my army career in NI. First three tours I thought the place was shit, then I did the best part of three years as a resident tourer, went outside the gate and loved the place. That’s probably why I live there now.

Er... Just ignore what I said then...

*Points* Ooh look at that A340-600 doing loop the loops!

*Legs it*
 
Re.
'Leans'
Do you feel it 'coming on' or do you become aware of it once something happens that doesn't correlate to what is expected?
(Hope that makes sense)

Awareness is usually something that comes after the onset, initially everything feels fine. Then it doesn't. It manifested itself in me through a feeling of queasiness and unease.

That’s what makes it so unpleasant and potentially dangerous. It’s difficult to recognise the onset because there isn’t any, it just happens by which time it’s too late. The feeling of unease is awful, you desperately want to shake your head clear but that makes it worse, you feel like you’re tumbling.

My worst case was a nasty night just after take off from Rhodes. You’re straight out over the sea, pitch black with no horizon and we were surrounded by thunderstorms, in and out of cloud as we tried to pick our way around the cells using weather radar. Suddenly we were in the clear and I cranked my head right round to look up from under the top window frame to try and assess how close we were to getting out on top. At that moment the cloud lit up for an instant with lightning and we went back into cloud and instant darkness again. I snapped my head back to the instruments and my brain melted.

Fortunately the autopilot was in and I handed control over to my mate but it was at least 30 seconds of serious, and I mean superhuman effort looking at the instruments whilst my head screamed “you’re in a spin” to get some sense of equilibrium back.

It was hideous.
 

Ritch

LE
That’s what makes it so unpleasant and potentially dangerous. It’s difficult to recognise the onset because there isn’t any, it just happens by which time it’s too late. The feeling of unease is awful, you desperately want to shake your head clear but that makes it worse, you feel like you’re tumbling.

My worst case was a nasty night just after take off from Rhodes. You’re straight out over the sea, pitch black with no horizon and we were surrounded by thunderstorms, in and out of cloud as we tried to pick our way around the cells using weather radar. Suddenly we were in the clear and I cranked my head right round to look up from under the top window frame to try and assess how close we were to getting out on top. At that moment the cloud lit up for an instant with lightning and we went back into cloud and instant darkness again. I snapped my head back to the instruments and my brain melted.

Fortunately the autopilot was in and I handed control over to my mate but it was at least 30 seconds of serious, and I mean superhuman effort looking at the instruments whilst my head screamed “you’re in a spin” to get some sense of equilibrium back.

It was hideous.

Do you have to file any kind of report when that happens?
 
Do you have to file any kind of report when that happens?

No, the safety of the aircraft was never in doubt (or no more so than usual when I’m involved).

There are certain events that must be reported but we can report anything we chose beyond that. It’s generally accepted that a company with lots of non mandatory reports has a good safety culture as guys report stuff so others may learn, even if they’ve cocked up, without fear of getting done.

It’s called “Just Culture” and basically revolves around the simple fact that to err is human and by definition, an error is not a deliberate act. You might get some extra training or some such but not punitive action against you.

Deliberate acts are an altogether different matter and I’ve seen a small number of ********* get binned for being, well, *********.
 
Do you have to file any kind of report when that happens?
No, the safety of the aircraft was never in doubt (or no more so than usual when I’m involved).

There are certain events that must be reported but we can report anything we chose beyond that. It’s generally accepted that a company with lots of non mandatory reports has a good safety culture as guys report stuff so others may learn, even if they’ve cocked up, without fear of getting done.

It’s called “Just Culture” and basically revolves around the simple fact that to err is human and by definition, an error is not a deliberate act. You might get some extra training or some such but not punitive action against you.

Deliberate acts are an altogether different matter and I’ve seen a small number of ********* get binned for being, well, *********.
The MoD instigated a survey some years ago to get aircrew to own up and to describe their experiences of the leans and another phenomena; out of body experiences.
 

Ritch

LE
The MoD instigated a survey some years ago to get aircrew to own up and to describe their experiences of the leans and another phenomena; out of body experiences.

I hope plenty responded. Like @Toastie said, to err is human nature and even the most experienced Sky God will have made a mistake at least once in their career. I imagine the results would help and inform others about what to do if and when the excrement hits the fan.
 

9.414

Old-Salt
No, the safety of the aircraft was never in doubt (or no more so than usual when I’m involved).

There are certain events that must be reported but we can report anything we chose beyond that. It’s generally accepted that a company with lots of non mandatory reports has a good safety culture as guys report stuff so others may learn, even if they’ve cocked up, without fear of getting done.

It’s called “Just Culture” and basically revolves around the simple fact that to err is human and by definition, an error is not a deliberate act. You might get some extra training or some such but not punitive action against you.

Deliberate acts are an altogether different matter and I’ve seen a small number of ********* get binned for being, well, *********.
The MOD have had some issues with implementing this concept. It only applies in certain very distinct areas - in the rest of the armed forces nobody would ever own up to something going wrong as that would be the grounds for the AGAI67/1027/prosecution!! Hence why mistakes continue to be made and people are grateful that they "got away with it" and valuable learning lessons are missed.

"Fail safe" is not the normal.
 
The MOD have had some issues with implementing this concept. It only applies in certain very distinct areas - in the rest of the armed forces nobody would ever own up to something going wrong as that would be the grounds for the AGAI67/1027/prosecution!! Hence why mistakes continue to be made and people are grateful that they "got away with it" and valuable learning lessons are missed.

"Fail safe" is not the normal.
I haven't experienced anything like that in British military aviation this century. Just culture has been a central tenet for a very long time. Indeed when I did considerable damage to a Gazelle in the 90s there was no comeback (aside from a Form 5 entry in the FRF).
 
I haven't experienced anything like that in British military aviation this century. Just culture has been a central tenet for a very long time. Indeed when I did considerable damage to a Gazelle in the 90s there was no comeback (aside from a Form 5 entry in the FRF).

”What’s that Sooty?”

“PULL UP! PULL UP!”
 
I think that this is the most enjoyable and informative thread drift on ARRSE.
Well done.
Keep it up.
 
I think that this is the most enjoyable and informative thread drift on ARRSE.
Well done.
Keep it up.

Oi!

We’re talking Flight.

Radar is commononly used.

Most in aviation work 24/7.

My dinner is on the table. I’ll be back to post a hottie hostie to conform to Arrse norms
 
Oi!

We’re talking Flight.

Radar is commononly used.

Most in aviation work 24/7.

My dinner is on the table. I’ll be back to post a hottie hostie to conform to Arrse norms
I wasn't actually being sarcastic.
 
Oi!

We’re talking Flight.

Radar is commononly used.

Most in aviation work 24/7.

My dinner is on the table. I’ll be back to post a hottie hostie to conform to Arrse norms
Commononly? :p

Take that bottle off him!
 

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