Flightradar 24

:) And it's not because of biscuit/tea interface issues that we sometimes unexpectedly have to slow you down, it's usually because one of the winged gods in front of you has fcuked it up (thank goodness for mode S speed) ;-)
That’s not a **** up, that’s wilful disobedience or the laws of aerodynamics. Mode S is a Spy In The Cab the functionality of which is being abused by people like you.:mrgreen:
 
That’s not a **** up, that’s wilful disobedience or the laws of aerodynamics. Mode S is a Spy In The Cab the functionality of which is being abused by people like you.:mrgreen:
I remember when Mode S was introduced in London TC (terminal control, where the folks do the approaches for LHR, LGW etc) and they could see the speed set and then pull up the lying barstewards :)
 
I remember when Mode S was introduced in London TC (terminal control, where the folks do the approaches for LHR, LGW etc) and they could see the speed set and then pull up the lying barstewards :)
I can remember cringing (me and every other pilot on frequency) listening to a BA ******** arguing the toss on this very point. Why?
 
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Sorry I know it's not complete as aviators have detached houses with at least 4 bedrooms (all en suite natch).
 
I can remember cringing (me and every other pilot on frequency) listening to a BA ******** arguing the toss on this very point. Why?
You answered your own question, BAW. ;-)
 

Ritch

LE
I was wide awake in the night and had a quick look on FR. At that time in the morning, freighters should have been leaving and landing at East Mids, Stansted etc and the skies filled with heavies bringing passengers to European airports from the US. At one point, two aircraft were over the skies of the UK. A RAF Voyager landing at EMA from Belize and a Scottish Air Ambulance. Never seen it so quiet.
 
You answered your own question, BAW. ;-)
Thankfully we don’t have too many in BAL although for years in the US we were called Speedbird.
 
Thankfully we don’t have too many in BAL although for years in the US we were called Speedbird.
Back in the day Speedbirds always sounded up their own arses. Oh wait.....
 
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Bit military (and old) but you'll probably grasp the sentiment :)
 
View attachment 461158
Sorry I know it's not complete as aviators have detached houses with at least 4 bedrooms (all en suite natch).
EGBR Ballroom

EGSQ Servants’ Quarters

EGFD Walking the dog in the fields

EGFP Shouting at pigeons in the fields

EGPF lying in the gutter howling at the moon :wink:
 
EGBR Ballroom

EGSQ Servants’ Quarters

EGFD Walking the dog in the fields

EGFP Shouting at pigeons in the fields

EGPF lying in the gutter howling at the moon :wink:
Knew you could be relied upon to fill it up like a bingo card :) (bingo is a game cook plays on her Thursday evening off).
 
You guess correctly. Autolands require kit on the ground to be of a certain standard so not all runways or even airports are adequately equipped. We only do them as a requirement when the visibility is below CAT I minima, typically 550m. We’d also do them if the cloud base is below CAT I, typically 200’. To put that in context, in 25 years I’ve done maybe half a dozen in anger.

We also have to do one a year either in the sim or on a flight to retain the qualifications needed and we do 3 a year in the sim on top of that which usually include system failures to test our knowledge and our decision making. Technically, as long as the ground equipment is in place you can do them whenever you want but we don’t generally bother as the landing is the professionally satisfying bit. When I say landing, that includes the descent and approach as a good landing is the result of a well planned and flown approach. The reverse is also true!

The descent and approach are a real Thought Sport as all the variables are just that and as the guy in the video explains, if you have to slow down unexpectedly (usually because @exbluejob and his cronies have just had their digestive biscuit break off in their tea or a similar calamity befall them) your ability to go down is reduced. It’s a 3D chess game at 8 miles a minute (I’m getting wood again).

If you want to try this at home, take the height you need to lose in thousands of feet, multiply it by 3 and add 10. That’ll give you the miles from Top of Descent (T/D in the video) to touch down, the +10 being for slowing down. It’s obviously a bit more than that with wind, ATC changing your routing because they’re stuck on one of The Times crossword clues etc but fag packet wise, it works well.

In the video you may have noticed a green arc moving back and forwards on the map when he was demonstrating the speed brake / spoilers? That’s an instantaneous read out of where in plan form you will hit the altitude selected in the system. As he deploys spoilers the rate of descent increases so the arc moves towards you. Really good bit of kit.
A couple of things surprised me about that video.
First was how far out he could clearly see the runway at LHR in broad daylight. He was still over central London. I know you’ve literally got a birds eye view, but that must be about 20 miles away.
He even commented on the angle approach of the super in front.

The second was how much manual input was needed on the column to keep the thing pointed in the right direction.
 
Knew you could be relied upon to fill it up like a bingo card :) (bingo is a game cook plays on her Thursday evening off).
The last one, did you twig?
 

Ritch

LE
A couple of things surprised me about that video.
First was how far out he could clearly see the runway at LHR in broad daylight. He was still over central London. I know you’ve literally got a birds eye view, but that must be about 20 miles away.
He even commented on the angle approach of the super in front.

The second was how much manual input was needed on the column to keep the thing pointed in the right direction.
When I was landing at Heathrow, we were doing a holding pattern over central London (the Thames was right below us with Canary Wharf sat next to it). The onboard map said we were at 9000ft and we were 23 miles from the destination. I could make out an airport in the distance - very far off - but I couldn't be sure it was Heathrow.
 
A couple of things surprised me about that video.
First was how far out he could clearly see the runway at LHR in broad daylight. He was still over central London. I know you’ve literally got a birds eye view, but that must be about 20 miles away.
He even commented on the angle approach of the super in front.

The second was how much manual input was needed on the column to keep the thing pointed in the right direction.
Airports and runways are a pretty unique shape so stick out like the proverbial.

The Fly By Wire system has a ratio thingy that replicates the effect of control inputs on more traditional control systems. In simple terms, the slower you go the more you have to deflect the control surfaces, ailerons etc, to get the same result ergo you need to put in bigger control inputs.

Exactly the same in your car, you need full lock to pull out of a parking space but try it at 70mph on the motorway.....
 
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Did mean to be provocative with . . . "Bit military . . " ;) .
I know how you roughy toughy baby killer army types view the RAF :)
 
TUI has been pretty much the same, most if not all repatriation flights now done, a bit of moving empties about to lay them up or get them into deep maintenance.

The CAA have extended the recency periods for things like landings, medical, sim checks and line checks but it’s all pretty much taking a running feck at a rolling doughnut; nobody really has much idea of time scales or indeed, much else. ID. Cards are the next big question mark as they have decency criteria too. There will come a point where safety and security can’t be stretched any more and then we are in a world of shit.
Whats the score with dailys / weeklies - have they been given some leeway there or are they obliged to keep at least a few bodies tipping up everyday just to adhere to the schedule.
 

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