Flightradar 24 and Marine spotting odds and sods.

BlipDriver

Old-Salt
Meanwhile, back on FR24...

A Twin Otter slogging from Calgary to the Maldives, a long way at 170kts. So far has routed Calgary - Saskatoon - Thompson - Ilaquit - Keflavik - Belfast on the most northerly ferry route.

This one was previously written off after a fatal crash in Yellowknife in 2011 but was rebuilt and re-registered for a new life.

View attachment 560576
8400nm at 170 knots? - do you suppose the reg stands for "Couldn't-Give a F*** Like"?
We had a couple of Twin Otter delivery flights a year or two ago going from Calgary to Chad via Cardiff, that's a lot shorter with less water crossing, & we thought that was challenging.
 

Bob Upndown

War Hero
Meanwhil, SAA marches onwards to the day there’s a smoking hole at the end of the runway at JNB (or any other airport)


The statement from the crew that “the aircraft lied”...thats the best today’s calibre of SAA flight deck could come up with??
 

Ritch

LE
Meanwhil, SAA marches onwards to the day there’s a smoking hole at the end of the runway at JNB (or any other airport)


The statement from the crew that “the aircraft lied”...thats the best today’s calibre of SAA flight deck could come up with??

I wish I'd got to fly on an A346 before Virgin retired them.
 
That is an epic trip!

Made it to Belgrade so far
C-GAFL_2021-03.jpg


A third of the journey up to now was just to get out of Canada!

Will they crack on eastwards through the 'stans or take the southern route through Egypt?

Edit: southern route:

Screenshot_20210328-100311_1_1.png
 
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DHC6 C-GAFL has two-thirds of its journey behind it, spent the night in Hurghada. Still has two more stopovers before the Maldives, next one will probably be in the eastern Gulf.

C-GAFL_2021-03-28.jpg
 
DHC6 C-GAFL has two-thirds of its journey behind it, spent the night in Hurghada. Still has two more stopovers before the Maldives, next one will probably be in the eastern Gulf.

View attachment 561047

There was (? is) a sizeable fleet of Twotter floatplanes based out there that do the connecting transfers from the main airport island out to the outlying hotel islands.

IIRC the crews live on Male island which is about 300 yards from the airport island and is the capital “city”. They’d come over to the airport island that has a concrete block house masquerading as a hotel because they could get a drink there, Male being dry. The evening would generally proceed thus: drink, pester girls on visiting crews for sex, fight. The order is interchangeable. There were some decent blokes but most (my memory) were bums who’d filtered down through other areas of aviation and ended up (literally) by means of various sundry acts of drunken fuckwittery and multiple divorces, washed up in Male.

On paper it should be an idyllic existence, flying float planes around a beautiful series of islands. The reality is very different I believe and all the evidence I saw backs that up.
 
C-GAFL itself used to have floats, in its previous guise as C-GARW, so I'd assume it'll be 'refloated' once it reaches Male.

Geek fact: the CAP12000 floats developed for the Twotter were the largest floats produced since WW2.
 
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Bob Upndown

War Hero
I wish I'd got to fly on an A346 before Virgin retired them.

Apart from the very loooong aisles, the onboard product was the same as all the other a/c at the time, including the very ill thought out Reynard J2000 seat which was replaced by the Upper Class Suite on only a few -600's before retirement. That said, having the Trents available rather than the CFM56's on the -300's meant that hot and heavy departures were a tad more assertive than using the curvature of the earth to gain altitude ;) .
 
There was (? is) a sizeable fleet of Twotter floatplanes based out there that do the connecting transfers from the main airport island out to the outlying hotel islands.

IIRC the crews live on Male island which is about 300 yards from the airport island and is the capital “city”. They’d come over to the airport island that has a concrete block house masquerading as a hotel because they could get a drink there, Male being dry. The evening would generally proceed thus: drink, pester girls on visiting crews for sex, fight. The order is interchangeable. There were some decent blokes but most (my memory) were bums who’d filtered down through other areas of aviation and ended up (literally) by means of various sundry acts of drunken fuckwittery and multiple divorces, washed up in Male.

On paper it should be an idyllic existence, flying float planes around a beautiful series of islands. The reality is very different I believe and all the evidence I saw backs that up.
I got chatting to the pilot of the Twotter that we flew on out there, and he said he spent the (Canadian) summer flying fishermen around the lakes and the (Canadian) winter in the Maldives. He said he'd never been out of a job since starting commercial flying and just loved his lifestyle.

No mention of drunken revelry was made, on the other hand he never took his sunglasses off.

I was fascinated by the relaxed attitude of the aircrew, having gone on holiday there directly from flying in BAOR where wearing two layers of flying clothing leaving the minimum of exposed flesh was mandatory whatever the weather, to them flying in short-sleeved shirts, shorts and flip-flops. Jealous, me? Muchly.
 

Ritch

LE
Apart from the very loooong aisles, the onboard product was the same as all the other a/c at the time, including the very ill thought out Reynard J2000 seat which was replaced by the Upper Class Suite on only a few -600's before retirement. That said, having the Trents available rather than the CFM56's on the -300's meant that hot and heavy departures were a tad more assertive than using the curvature of the earth to gain altitude ;) .

It was just the aircraft itself. I thought it was a very good looking airframe. Especially in Virgin colours.
 
I got chatting to the pilot of the Twotter that we flew on out there, and he said he spent the (Canadian) summer flying fishermen around the lakes and the (Canadian) winter in the Maldives. He said he'd never been out of a job since starting commercial flying and just loved his lifestyle.

No mention of drunken revelry was made, on the other hand he never took his sunglasses off.

I was fascinated by the relaxed attitude of the aircrew, having gone on holiday there directly from flying in BAOR where wearing two layers of flying clothing leaving the minimum of exposed flesh was mandatory whatever the weather, to them flying in short-sleeved shirts, shorts and flip-flops. Jealous, me? Muchly.
I’m sure there were plenty who made a great time out of it without being twunts. We just never saw them.
 
Apart from the very loooong aisles,

Funny thing is that length traces back to a single decision in the late 1960s

Originally the paper design for the Airbus A300 was really fat, something like 6.3 metres across the fuselage. Like a 777 but even fatter. Such that passengers could transfer to or from an international 747 and keep their same seat positions.

But then there was a traffic downturn and the partners had a bit of a panic and slimmed it down to make the A300B, nine-abreast.

And for the next 30 years Airbus kept stretching that fuselage... instead of taking the plunge and going wider.
 
Made it to Belgrade so far
View attachment 560768

A third of the journey up to now was just to get out of Canada!

Will they crack on eastwards through the 'stans or take the southern route through Egypt?

Edit: southern route:

View attachment 560795

This:
is interesting, because it shows countries in actual size, particularly how small Greenland is, and how feckin huge Africa is... Russia doesn’t look too impressive either.
 

Ritch

LE
A trio of USAF MC-130J's out of Mildenhall for an exercise by the looks of it.

Screenshot_20210329-195117_Flightradar24.jpg
 
This:
is interesting, because it shows countries in actual size, particularly how small Greenland is, and how feckin huge Africa is... Russia doesn’t look too impressive either.
That’s a seriously diverting website! Spent a happy hour tinkering around with it.

I know. Get a life.
 

Ritch

LE
Saw this article today about a 787-8 flying a 12,000 mile route non stop in 20+ hours.


@Toastie - bit of a stupid question but is there any difference in the 787-9 from the 787-8 apart from length? Does it fly differently?
 
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Saw this article today about a 787-8 flying a 12,000 mile route non stop in 20+ hours.


@Toastie - bit of a stupid question but is there any difference in the 787-9 from the 787-8 apart from length? Does it differently?
They are working towards the 787-11 which will be the greatest ever made.




As it goes to 11.
 
Does it differently?

It does very differently.

The 787-9 is pretty much Dreamliner NG. It corrects a lot of design errors and goofs made in the -8, and in fact there was some thought given to discontinuing the -8 and shrinking the -9.

The -9 and -10 are cheaper to build than the -8 despite being larger. And you can't specify a -8 and then change your mind, too many structural differences particularly in the wing and fuselage frames. There's only about 50% commonality, essentially they're different aircraft.

Now from the pilot's perspective they don't need to worry about all that, thanks to the miracle of software.
 
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