Flight aptitude test - Air traffic controller practice scenario

Hi,

I'm currently revising for my CBATs and was wondering if anyone knew of anywhere to practice the Air Traffic controller scenario with the bearings? I'm basically struggling to find anywhere online which has something kind of similar in terms of guiding aircraft through the use of bearings. If anyone could help point me in the right direction that would be hugely appreciated as not sure where was best to post this!

Many thanks,

A
 

CatsEyes

War Hero
I went through a lot of A4 sheets of paper when I practiced bearings, tracks and headings - pre-computer days.

I drew a large circle with a dot in the centre, randomly put about 20 dots around, inside the circle, and then estimated the bearings from the centre dot to various other dots, and from one random dot to another random dot. Having written down each estimate, I then measured them accurately using a protractor. Once one sheet of A4 was clogged with dots, lines and written estimates, I repeated the exercise on a fresh sheet of A4.

Time consuming and dull, but it worked, and before too long I was able to give consistent estimates to within 5 degrees. The tedium paid off at Shawbury on the radar phase of my JATCC as I never had to worry about my accuracy. Good luck.
 
Flight sim X has air traffic control in it, you can practice online with people who will ignore you and crash into the tower.
 
I'm currently revising for my CBATs and was wondering if anyone knew of anywhere to practice the Air Traffic controller scenario with the bearings?
Pssstt you posted this in Join the Army - Regular Officer Recruiting you do know that the Army does not now, nor has it ever had Air Traffic Controllers? Wives of at Wetmold etc. do not count ;-)
 

CatsEyes

War Hero
Pssstt you posted this in Join the Army - Regular Officer Recruiting you do know that the Army does not now, nor has it ever had Air Traffic Controllers? Wives of at Wetmold etc. do not count ;-)
Strangely when I left the Army, having worked at Detmold Tower, I saw on my qualification card that they had recorded Air Traffic Controller on it. I knew it was just an "Army" thing, and incorrect, but it was good to see it there anyway! All I'd completed at that time was the (then) AATC course at Shawbury.
 
Strangely when I left the Army, having worked at Detmold Tower, I saw on my qualification card that they had recorded Air Traffic Controller on it. I knew it was just an "Army" thing, and incorrect, but it was good to see it there anyway! All I'd completed at that time was the (then) AATC course at Shawbury.
AATC's (As they used to known) are not controllers :) Last time I was at Shawbury (good few years ago) there had been only 2 Army candidates for the AATC course, both failed.
 

CatsEyes

War Hero
AATC's (As they used to known) are not controllers :) Last time I was at Shawbury (good few years ago) there had been only 2 Army candidates for the AATC course, both failed.
I realise an AATC wasn't a controller - that's why I wrote that it was incorrect!
I hope I was one of the two passes you mentioned - Course 433, 27 Jan 77 to 8 Mar 77, Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Ability awarded. It's hanging on my toilet wall.
 
Pssstt you posted this in Join the Army - Regular Officer Recruiting you do know that the Army does not now, nor has it ever had Air Traffic Controllers? Wives of at Wetmold etc. do not count ;-)
I'm going for pilot role but the reason I asked about the ATC scenario was that during the CBAT test for a pilot, there's a section where you are in command of an ATC tower and have to guide planes through certain coloured waypoints and at different altitudes. Initially found it difficult at the beginning but by the time I was getting the hang of it the task was over. Hopefully now have a better understanding and should be find with it next time round!
 
I went through a lot of A4 sheets of paper when I practiced bearings, tracks and headings - pre-computer days.

I drew a large circle with a dot in the centre, randomly put about 20 dots around, inside the circle, and then estimated the bearings from the centre dot to various other dots, and from one random dot to another random dot. Having written down each estimate, I then measured them accurately using a protractor. Once one sheet of A4 was clogged with dots, lines and written estimates, I repeated the exercise on a fresh sheet of A4.

Time consuming and dull, but it worked, and before too long I was able to give consistent estimates to within 5 degrees. The tedium paid off at Shawbury on the radar phase of my JATCC as I never had to worry about my accuracy. Good luck.
Thanks for the the response! I'll certainly give that method a try as apart from revising angles and bearings and doing some worksheets was struggling to find anything else!
 

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