Flat screen TV, LCD or plasma?

#1
OK I'm about to get myself a flat screen TV but don't know which way to go. I've heard plasmas have better colour definition but use a lot more power so LCD would be the way to go.

Anybody got any experience/suggestions?
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#2
Plasma are the better TV's without a doubt. BUT....

The little Logo that appears on many Sat TV stations can (apparently) burn itself onto the screen after a while.
If you are serving and move house a lot, Plasma TV can be damaged by tilting them.
Plasma TVs have a more limited life before the gas needs replacing.
Plasma costs more to buy and run.

BUT....

They look way cooler and have a better picture viewing angle range!
They can be bigger (I've heard of a new one thats 100(ish) inches!!!
 
#3
I'm going to have to disagree with Legs here......

LCD is far superior to Plasma.
You can get 'burn in' on plasmas after as little as a month.
The resolution (picture quality) is vastly superior on LCD.
Look cooler?????
The only downside is that you'll pay slightly more for an equivalent sized LCD when compared to Plasma.

Buy an LCD - you know you want to.


TTFN

BFG
 
#4
Legs said:
Plasma are the better TV's without a doubt. BUT....

The little Logo that appears on many Sat TV stations can (apparently) burn itself onto the screen after a while.

If you are serving and move house a lot, Plasma TV can be damaged by tilting them.
Plasma TVs have a more limited life before the gas needs replacing.
Plasma costs more to buy and run.

BUT....

They look way cooler and have a better picture viewing angle range!
They can be bigger (I've heard of a new one thats 100(ish) inches!!!
Very true!!!! And if one of those pixels burn out then watching it is more irritating than a triplet pram being pushed through a narrow aisle in morrisons on a Saturday morning!!!
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#5
BFG 9000 said:
I'm going to have to disagree with Legs here......

LCD is far superior to Plasma.
You can get 'burn in' on plasmas after as little as a month.
The resolution (picture quality) is vastly superior on LCD.
Look cooler?????
The only downside is that you'll pay slightly more for an equivalent sized LCD when compared to Plasma.

Buy an LCD - you know you want to.


TTFN

BFG
I'm no expert - they're just my views. BTW, I went for LCD!! (Humax 36 inch. Single analogue tuner, twin Digital tuners, hard drive recorder, HD ready - nice TV :) )
 
#6
I've found LCD to cost more than plasma (about 1/3 more) for the same size. There seems to be so much choice but the people in the shops don't have a clue either.

I like the picture quality on the Sony LCDs that I've looked at and price is resonable too. I just want to be sure I don't go out and spend a fortune on the "wrong technology".
 
#7
Just looked up that TV on the net and it indeed does look like a nice TV. How much did you pay for it if you don't mind me asking?
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#8
From SSVC Germany (robbing B@rstards!) it cost €1700. I don't know how much in UK. It is also set up to be a PC monitor. Games would look SOOOO cool!
 
#9
Can anyone recommend a good 28" LCD with integrated digital etc then? My very expensive widescreen digital has just died horribly, a month after the five year warranty expired and a TV engineer advised me that it would be cheaper to replace than repair. It is now in a skip. He also advised me never to buy a TV from the same manufacturer again - 8 letters starting with a P, as they have in his opinion a far too high failure rate.

Any recommendations?
 
#10
im just about to buy a samsung 26" high def, high def LCD screens are better than plasma and normal analogue TVs.
all of samsungs LCDs from 23" and above are all HD Ready.

www.play.com is the way to go for cheap things.
 
#11
It depends firstly on which picture you like, then where you will use it, ambient light and so on. Then what you want to watch. If you like lots of sport or action movies, for instance, then Plasma should be the way to go as LCDTVs can get a bit behind with a response time typically of 8 ms however I know many poeple who do not notice this.

Modern plasma TVs can suffer from burn in however have developed to the extent that you have to have the same image in the same spot and the set on for weeks before it happens. They have software built into them which is supposed to sort it out.

Power requirements are similar. As for resolution, modern LCDTVs can have slightly higher resolution but remember that a normal TV has a very low resolution and is fine. The resolution of the average TV signal or DVD for instance is well behind what these things are capable of showing, plasma or LCD.

Most plasmas now are guaranteed for 60,000 hours or more which means, for the average household, they are good for several years.

What should dictate your choice really boils down to which picture you like as they are slightly different. I like the plasma, as to me, it has a richer feel to it; some prefer LCDTV. Just make sure you read the specifications carefully (but take with a pinch of salt), buy from a manufacturer you have heard of and don't believe all the hype. Any at bargain price will be older models or the screens will not be so good. There are only a few factories producing LCDTV panels so you may find that the brands are using the same panels but packaged differently.

For the future, most smart money is on LCDTVs as they have much more development potential than Plasmas, which are seen by many in the field to have reached maturity, and screen production costs are coming down steadily for both types.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
abeaumont said:
Can anyone recommend a good 28" LCD with integrated digital etc then? My very expensive widescreen digital has just died horribly, a month after the five year warranty expired and a TV engineer advised me that it would be cheaper to replace than repair. It is now in a skip. He also advised me never to buy a TV from the same manufacturer again - 8 letters starting with a P, as they have in his opinion a far too high failure rate.

Any recommendations?
+
Go for a bigger LCD than CRT, as the case size is much smaller that the CRT. The one I mentioned above takes up less space than the 28" CRT I used to have.
 
#13
abeaumont said:
Can anyone recommend a good 28" LCD with integrated digital etc then? My very expensive widescreen digital has just died horribly, a month after the five year warranty expired and a TV engineer advised me that it would be cheaper to replace than repair. It is now in a skip. He also advised me never to buy a TV from the same manufacturer again - 8 letters starting with a P, as they have in his opinion a far too high failure rate.

Any recommendations?
Samsung, 26" is only £650. HD Ready, with Freeview tuner, wall mountable, s-video, pc input etc.
http://play.com/play247.asp?pa=srmr&page=title&r=ELEC&title=705871

Samsung 32" HD ready, specs are on the page, £850
http://play.com/play247.asp?pa=srmr&page=title&r=ELEC&title=742345
 
#15
last month I purchased a 30" Conrac LCD from Dabs.com for £500 - they are now £460.

It is not HD Ready as although it has a DVI input and a resolution of 1280x768 it is not HDCP (the encryption bit) compatible. I don't care though as my 28" widescreen CRT blew and I needed a replacement. It does not have a digital tuner just an analogue one but a £30 freeview tuner via the Scart socket does the job.

PC and Xbox 360 games look great which lets face it is what matters more when you get back from the pub.

http://www.dabs.com/ProductView.aspx?Quicklinx=3TLW&CategorySelectedId=11038&InMerch=1
 
#16
From Which Extra:

Plasma TV

Prices of plasma and DLP TVs are falling but if you’re after the ultimate in picture quality, there are cheaper options to these hi-tech sets.

Both plasma and digital light processing (DLP) screens are much slimmer than conventional sets. With plasma technology, you can have a very large (42-inch or 50-inch) screen that’s only about 10cm deep, meaning you can mount it on a wall. A 32-inch conventional set is about 50 to 60cm deep. DLP screens are deeper than plasma models – but still much slimmer than a conventional TV. The vast majority of plasma and DLP TVs are widescreen models.

Many (but not all) flat-panel TVs are capable of screening High Definition broadcasts. Look for the HD Ready logo to be sure they have the necessary sockets and screen resolution. High Definition (HD) TV pictures boast hitherto unheard-of picture clarity and quality. Sky launches HDTV satellite subscription services in 2006. But don’t expect any free-to-view HD broadcasts until the analogue TV switch-off is complete in 2012.

If you’re more interested in regular TV broadcasts conventional TVs are still hard to beat. You’ll pay on average around £1,800 for a 42-inch plasma screen, compared with nearer £800 for a Best Buy conventional 32-inch set. And the hi-tech models usually have poorer picture quality.

Another word of warning: plasma TVs use around three times as much electricity as the best conventional TVs. And we don’t know how long plasma and DLP screens will last or whether they’ll degrade over time.

The technology – plasma

A plasma display is an array of tiny gas cells sandwiched between two sheets of glass. Each cell acts like a mini fluorescent tube, emitting ultraviolet light which then strikes red, green and blue spots on the screen. These spots glow to build a picture.

The technology – DLP

Digital light processing (DLP) is most often used in projectors but is moving into the TV market. It works by bouncing coloured light off a microchip containing more than a million tiny mirrors that pivot up or down. The reflected light from each mirror is projected on to the screen. DLP screens are much thinner than normal TV screens but, at around 35cm deep, they’re not suitable for hanging on the wall.

LCD TV

Sales of sleek, space-saving liquid crystal display (LCD) TVs are soaring – particularly smaller, cheaper sets.

The beauty of an LCD TV is that it’s much slimmer (about 20 to 30cm deep compared with 50 to 60cm deep for a 32-inch conventional set with a cathode ray tube). The vast majority of LCD TVs are widescreen – although portables are still available in the traditional 4:3 format. They work by shining light through a matrix of tiny coloured liquid crystal cells.

Prices are falling – though you’ll still have to pay around £1,000 for a 32-inch model. If you’re interested in high-definition broadcasts (Sky and Telewest are launching subscription channels in 2006) look out for the HD Ready label. But, if you’re after the ultimate in picture quality for normal broadcast TV, you shouldn’t consider an LCD TV at the moment. For one thing, they don’t do blacks well, so darker pictures tend to look washed out. They also have a ‘smearing’ effect on fast-moving images (a sports match, for example). There are some exceptions but they are few and far between.

Another question is how well they’ll fare long-term. At the moment, we don’t know how long LCD screens will last or whether they’ll degrade over time.

The technology

Liquid crystal display (LCD) screens come to life when light from behind the screen is shone through the screen’s matrix of tiny coloured liquid crystal cells. Signals control each cell, letting varying amounts of colour through, and a picture is built up.

Hope it helps
 
#17
projector

feeling flush get a HD ready projector.


bulbs cost alot, dark room needed... for older ones

easily moved, awsome picture, and its bloody massive screen size!

life size porn/huge xbox and footy screen area. i rest my case
 
#18
Freemans catalogue have some of the gucci Toshiba WLT58 LCD TVs on offer. You get 20% off your first order with them and the 32" model starts at £1200 without the discount. Very good TVs with integral stand. Check out the link for details...

Freemans TVs
 
#19
I'd be a tiny bit wary about getting a projector - they need to be ceiling mounted to ensure that things/people etc don't keep getting in the way of the beam. They generate a lot of heat and have to have a cooling fan. I have had one in my classroom since September and the noise is not normally noticed in such an environment, but will be obtrusive in the home at times. Bulbs have a short life and currently cost just over £250 each. Keep your kids out of the beam - they'll tend to want to look into it. Not a good idea as the lamp is a mercury discharge lamp and chucks out rather a lot of UV which is not at all good for the eyes. There is quite a serious safety waning out from the Health & Safety Executive regarding the use of the things.

Thanks for the advice re LCD TVs.
 
#20
Legs said:
Plasma are the better TV's without a doubt. BUT....

Plasma TVs have a more limited life before the gas needs replacing.
!!
This is an urban myth. some salesmen pedal this one in order to sell you the pointless extended warranty which is mostly commission for them! Some spotty twat in Dixons also told me about re-gassing, that can be done at a later date. Complete tosh. Last time I looked, over a year ago, No such thing exists, and no-one currently in the UK offers this service. When Plasmas are knackered, they are binned/recycled. this is probably the most cost effective option.

Plasmas do fade over time, but so do LCDs and conventional CRT sets. Even a faded screen is still usable in a domestic context. So far as is known, Plasmas last about the same time as CRTs.

On balance, go for an LCD if you can afford it, Plasma if you cant. By the time either wear out, they will be much cheaper anyway, as new technology can only become established if its cheap enough in the first place. The high prices today merely reflect the manufacturers attempt to recoup some of their R&D costs.
 
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