Fitness training for the paras...

#1
I'm going in the paras and passed ADSC a couple of months ago, I got pretty decent scores for the fitness, 10 heaves and 8:29 in the 1.5 mile run. Anyway, I got my start date for 9th August so I've got about 8 weeks to train, I'm just wondering if I'm doing the right sort of prep. I used the 6 weeks to ADSC programme before going to ADSC (you can find it somewhere on the paras website), but now I've come up with my own programme starting for this week (I'm on the third day now), here it is.

MONDAY MORNING: 30 MIN RUN
MONDAY AFTERNOON: WORKOUT
TUESDAY MORNING: 8 HILL SHUTTLE RUNS (100M SPRINT, 100M JOG)
TUESDAY AFTERNOON: WORKOUT
WEDNESDAY: SWIMMING (35 LENGTHS)
THURSDAY MORNING: 45 MIN RUN
THURSDAY AFTERNOON: WORKOUT
FRIDAY MORNING: 2 MILE RUN (BEST EFFORT)
FRIDAY AFTERNOON: WORKOUT
SATURDAY: REST DAY
SUNDAY MORNING: 2 MIN PRESS-UPS, 2 MIN SIT-UPS, MAX HEAVES
SUNDAY AFTERNOON: 1 HOUR RUN

The workout is max for first set, then half-max pyramids for the next 3 sets of these exercises: press-ups, sit-ups, squats, chin-ups, dips, half sit-ups, shoulder press (with weight) and pull-ups.

I just want to know if I'm going the right way about it, as in am I doing too much of something or not enough of something, or is there something I've missed out but should be doing ie bergan workouts?

Obviously I mean to make it harder as the weeks go on, and mix it up a bit (like doing a bit of rowing instead of swimming or something like that) but I'm just wondering if this is a decent programme to follow because I'd like to be as fit as I can get without overdoing it before I go in.

Any advice would be much appreciated, cheers.
 
#2
Looks decent, but maybe a bit too much you could end up overtraining. i have recently fell foul of this as well to tell the truth.

On the body workout you could maybe stick some deadlifts and rows in there, deadlifts are a very important strength excercise with the squats imho. Bench presses and Inverted rows are good to compliment the press ups and balance the muscles out. Upper body strength will help with those bergens.

I have been told not to touch the Bergen work until I actually start with 4para.
 
#3
Yeah, I've heard people saying you shouldn't put weight on your back, but then some people say running with weight should make up the bulk of your training :?

How do you do the deadlifts by the way, with heavy weight or lighter weights to get a bit of a pump? I've always heard they were a power/mass building exercise.

About overtraining, I find it a bit hard to gauge if I'm doing too much. On one hand I don't want to over do it but on the other I want to work hard and make the most out of my time, do you know what I mean?

Like yesterday, I did the shuttle runs and they weren't as hard as I expected, yet my legs have been caning from the squats, and they're only bodyweight squats - probably because im not used to them.
 
#4
BaronPhilly said:
Yeah, I've heard people saying you shouldn't put weight on your back, but then some people say running with weight should make up the bulk of your training :?

How do you do the deadlifts by the way, with heavy weight or lighter weights to get a bit of a pump? I've always heard they were a power/mass building exercise.

About overtraining, I find it a bit hard to gauge if I'm doing too much. On one hand I don't want to over do it but on the other I want to work hard and make the most out of my time, do you know what I mean?

Like yesterday, I did the shuttle runs and they weren't as hard as I expected, yet my legs have been caning from the squats, and they're only bodyweight squats - probably because im not used to them.
I would recommend keeping the reps fairly low, 3 - 6 since this will build strength and power without muscular hypertrophy(bulking up). You can use the same rep-range with Bench Press, Squats, Bent Over Rows etc.

Squats with a barbell are a fantastic exercise; they work every major muscles group, not just the legs.

Good luck. :)
 
#7
Milesy said:
Yeah strength training and muscle training are not the same.

Look at the Stronglifts 5x5 program.

http://stronglifts.com/stronglifts-5x5-beginner-strength-training-program

This is more concentrated on strength rather than size. A lot of guys in my gym are absolutely massive, not are very weak, and there are small guys lifting great weight. Strength is what you want.
Exactly. If you're training for the Paras, the last thing you want is huge muscles that burn oxygen quickly. Powerlifters and Olympic weight lifters are, pound for pound, much stronger than Bodybuilders.
 
#8
I got a 6 weeks training programme right from the horses mouth at the weekend its very similar to what you have written except each weeks training regime varies.

Also it doesn't include doing your circuit training all on the same day. For example-

Monday-3 mile run followed by max pressups. The pressups is best effort and once completed you half that amount and do 4 sets the halfed number. So, if you max out at 50 you would then do 4 sets of 25.Thats monday completed.

Tuesday-fartlek-3 mile route use lamp posts,sprint then jogfrom lamp post to lamp post,sit-ups same routine as pressups=do max pressups then half the amount then do 4 sets.

Wednesday-rest

Thursday-20 mins on rowing machine or 40 mins bike ride,pull ups same routine as sits and pressups.

Friday- 2mile best effort-pressups

Saturday-rest

Sunday-1 hour run/walk,sit ups

Week 2
Monday-3 mile run,pull ups

Tuesday-sprints on football pitch(sprint the long lengths, jog the shorts, 10 times then alternate,sprint shorts jog the longs repeated 10 times.Press ups

Wednesday-rest

Thursday-4 mile slow run,sit ups

Friday-find dome hills do shuttle runs up the hills and rest coming down,push ups

Saturday-rest

Sunday-go to the parkand set up a circuitusing combination of sprints,arms(press ups/dips/shoulder press),trunk(sit ups/crunches/alt v sits/dorsal raises)and legs(squats/starjumps/lunges/burpees)for 30 mins 100%best effort.

The regime then goes on for another 4 weeks.Including swimming activities and 1.5 mile best efforts with 1.5 mile warm up. Warm up must be completed in less than 15 mins.Week six day 5 is test week were you test yourself on 2 min situps,2 min pressups and best effort heaves aswell as 1.5 miles with 800m warm up.

Also the press ups,sit ups and pull ups become harder. It says to add a rucksack with a little weight to your back when doing pull ups. Add a 3 litre bottle of water to your chest when doing sit ups. The weight comes into use in week 3.

Hope this helps.
 
#9
yeah mate, that was the build up to ADSC programme I used. It's a good programme, I tailored it a bit to suit my needs though as there weren't enough heaves, something that I needed to improve on, but all in all it gets you too a good level of fitness.

How often do you recommend doing that Strength 5x5 programme by the way? It sounds good, I just wonder how to fit it round my normal workout, like should I do it on the same days or once a week or whatever? (thanks for all the info by the way fellas)
 
#10
BaronPhilly said:
yeah mate, that was the build up to ADSC programme I used. It's a good programme, I tailored it a bit to suit my needs though as there weren't enough heaves, something that I needed to improve on, but all in all it gets you too a good level of fitness.

How often do you recommend doing that Strength 5x5 programme by the way? It sounds good, I just wonder how to fit it round my normal workout, like should I do it on the same days or once a week or whatever? (thanks for all the info by the way fellas)
The 5X5 is an excellent program, but it is extremely intensive and needs a great deal of recovery time; for example, you cannot do two workouts on consecutive days. You need at least 24 hours between 5X5 sessions.

Also, if you are inexperianced at weight training, 5X5 can be too much of a shock to the system.
 
#11
The beginners program is 3 work outs a week with two workouts. So if you work out on monday wednesday and friday you do workout A / workout B / workout A, then the next week it will be workout B / workout A / workout B. Only three times a week leaves a lot more time for running and stuff.
 
#12
Milesy said:
The beginners program is 3 work outs a week with two workouts. So if you work out on monday wednesday and friday you do workout A / workout B / workout A, then the next week it will be workout B / workout A / workout B. Only three times a week leaves a lot more time for running and stuff.
5X5, 3X3 etc are popular with MMA fighters, but they adapt them because they are doing so much training that a full 5X5 program would be too much. So, for example, they'll do TWO sessions per week instead of three.

For anyone with six months or less weight training under their belt, I'd recommend starting the 5X5 with just the Olympic Bar(which weighs 20 kilos on it's own). The next session, add two 1.25 kilo discs to the bar. Do this every session and you gradually increase the weight while allowing your body time to adapt. It also gives you time to learn correct technique, which is vital.
 
#13
Wendlers 5/3/1 program is another one you might want to look into. It's a low volume programme on the main lifts that leaves the amount of extra assistance work you do up to you.
 
#14
I might try replacing my normal Friday workout with the StrongLifts 5x5 work out because then I've got a recovery day after. I still want to make most of my training just normal press-ups, situps and that because thats what I'm going to be doing a lot of when I'm in, but to have at least one good strength workout a week will no doubt be a great help.

I've also started a new press up workout today. It lasts for ten days, and I'm thinking of just cutting out the press-ups from my normal workout and doing this instead until the ten days is up.

It basically consists of doing 200 press-ups every day, execept on odd days doing 200 in as few sets as possible (with around 2 min in between) so that your going to the max on each set. On even days you can spread the sets out over the day, doing say 20 sets of 10 if you like. You can also vary the press-ups, doing wide ones and diamond ones if you like. After the 10 days is up, your meant to have 3 days off upperbody work and then retest your max.

Apparently it's meant to greatly increase your maximum amount in a short time.

The link is here if anyone's interested: http://www.military.com/military-fitness/workouts/try-pushup-push-workout
 
#15
Ian1983 said:
Wendlers 5/3/1 program is another one you might want to look into. It's a low volume programme on the main lifts that leaves the amount of extra assistance work you do up to you.
Westside For Skinny B@stards is another good 'un. :wink:
 
#16
Werewolf said:
Ian1983 said:
Wendlers 5/3/1 program is another one you might want to look into. It's a low volume programme on the main lifts that leaves the amount of extra assistance work you do up to you.
Westside For Skinny B@stards is another good 'un. :wink:
I've heard good things about that as well.

These things go through phases though, so it's a pain in the arse to work out what works and what doesn't work for you, since you have to really give each programme 3-4 months to really take efffect.
 
#17
Mate whilst I agree with some of the excellent training tips posted here, its important to remember a couple of things if you are gearing your training towards joining the Parachute Regiment.


1. P Company is a runners course, so the bulk of your training should be formed around that. Mix it up........... fell/cross country running, interval running, fartlek, short-sharp hill sprint sessions etc

2. You need to be strong as a recruit, but training with heavy weights (low reps) to build strength can cause injury. Back injury from deadlifts is common for a novice, mainly due to poor form.

Personally my training was centred around lots of running and bodyweight exercises. Again mix up the types of push ups (close arm, wide arm, standard, hindu/dive-bomber) sit-ups, pull-ups, handstand press etc.

Your looking to be an all round athlete. Strong, fast, good cardio, with determination and aggression. Forget the Bergan runs until your at Depot as your likely to injury yourself. Just get out running, do the bodyweight exercises, circuit training and also get some time in on the punch bag.
 
#18
You said that you used the 6 week before ADSC guide on the internet, but I can't find it.

Any one got a linky?
 
#19
Werewolf said:
For anyone with six months or less weight training under their belt, I'd recommend starting the 5X5 with just the Olympic Bar(which weighs 20 kilos on it's own). The next session, add two 1.25 kilo discs to the bar. Do this every session and you gradually increase the weight while allowing your body time to adapt. It also gives you time to learn correct technique, which is vital.
Just the Olympic bar on bench, squat and deadlifts to start off with?

You're having a laugh aren't you!

So after 3 months training on your terms a man will be squatting, deadlifting and benching 52kg? That's not even a plate a side!

Anyone wishing to embark on a weight training programme is better off visiting www.muscletalk.co.uk and not listening to the sh1te spouted on here.
 
#20
Fallschirmjager said:
Werewolf said:
For anyone with six months or less weight training under their belt, I'd recommend starting the 5X5 with just the Olympic Bar(which weighs 20 kilos on it's own). The next session, add two 1.25 kilo discs to the bar. Do this every session and you gradually increase the weight while allowing your body time to adapt. It also gives you time to learn correct technique, which is vital.
Just the Olympic bar on bench, squat and deadlifts to start off with?

You're having a laugh aren't you!

So after 3 months training on your terms a man will be squatting, deadlifting and benching 52kg? That's not even a plate a side!

Anyone wishing to embark on a weight training programme is better off visiting www.muscletalk.co.uk and not listening to the sh1te spouted on here.
Tendon strength is not something you can rush.
 

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