FITNESS Qs & ADSC 1.5 mile run times

How do you deal with pain when running? The onl;y thing holding me back from a sub 12 minute run is the fact my ankle/achilles tendon have started being very painful recently. I've just started training/running (I tested myself with no prior training and got 12:30) I did some interval training the other day and it feels as though my ankles and achilles tendon are just seizing up. Not sure if it's the sort of pain I should grit my teeth and bear or if I need to change something before I damage myself.
There's loads of stuff on the interweb about running and achilles tendinitis, but I'd strongly suggest you back off whatever plays it up, or just stop, till the issue is sorted.

The Ultimate Runner's Guide to Achilles Tendinitis

Tendon problems don't tend to heal that fast because tendons have a crap blood flow to them (so I've been told).

I think the problem is that you've done speedwork (intervals), without any base training (easy running). Ideally people should do about 3 months of base training before adding speed. Maybe young whipper snappers can get away with it more than middle-aged types like me. But not you, obviously.

And if you want to put weight on, weight lifting will be needed, but you'll also have to substantially increase your calories. A weight gain supplement might be the easiest way to do this.
 
Don't do interval training for a sub-12 minute time, and don't train every day. It's advice like that which results in people getting injured due to overtraining.

Sub-12 minutes is easily achievable by just doing some easy jogging/running a couple times a week. I started at about 14 minutes and in about 6 weeks of running every other day am down to about 9:30, depending on traffic and how fresh my legs are. I never did any interval training, just doing a 2.4km timed run on monday, and a couple of distance runs (I worked my way up to 10km, 47min, but that's because I kind of enjoy the running, it's not needed for a sub-12 at all)
 
Don't do interval training for a sub-12 minute time, and don't train every day. It's advice like that which results in people getting injured due to overtraining.

Sub-12 minutes is easily achievable by just doing some easy jogging/running a couple times a week. I started at about 14 minutes and in about 6 weeks of running every other day am down to about 9:30, depending on traffic and how fresh my legs are. I never did any interval training, just doing a 2.4km timed run on monday, and a couple of distance runs (I worked my way up to 10km, 47min, but that's because I kind of enjoy the running, it's not needed for a sub-12 at all)
Let’s just quickly check the background to that advice.

Running coach? PTI? Actually passsed recruit selection or training?

Worth checking as your statement above is in straight contradiction to plenty of people who tick some or all of those boxes.
 
Let’s just quickly check the background to that advice.

Running coach? PTI? Actually passsed recruit selection or training?

Worth checking as your statement above is in straight contradiction to plenty of people who tick some or all of those boxes.
Don't need to be a running coach or PTI to know that 'grow a pair, grit your teeth and run more' isn't a solution to someone with tendinitis, no matter how macho it might make you sound. In fact last time I checked they were in the middle of changing the way PTIs instruct because it was resulting in unnecessary injuries due to recruits blowing their knees out without any benefit.
 
So no knowledge at all then. Good job we got that straight.
No knowledge might be better than whatever bad knowledge makes you insist that he run his way through tendinitis. I'm pretty much saying the exact same as the previous poster, cut your mileage or completely stop until the inflammation stops as running will do nothing but further damage. Low-impact cardio like cycling to keep some conditioning would be ideal.

Or you can just try and pull rank on an anonymous webforum because it makes you feel like you're back in the good old days and continue to give bad advice. Whatever floats your boat.
 
If you bothered to read before gobbing off, you would see that the advice was consistent - back off, recover, build slowly.

Once you have the base to build on, intervals and regular running are fine.
 
Don't need to be a running coach or PTI to know that 'grow a pair, grit your teeth and run more' isn't a solution to someone with tendinitis, no matter how macho it might make you sound. In fact last time I checked they were in the middle of changing the way PTIs instruct because it was resulting in unnecessary injuries due to recruits blowing their knees out without any benefit.
The jury hasn't even sat on the proposed new PT training methods. The wider Army's awareness is pretty much limited to an article in Soldier magazine that does not go into detail, and it awaits to be seen whether it has real benefits, or whether - when all is said and done - it is a 'fad' capitalising on how the last conflict was fought.

Low-impact interval-type cross-training might be great for short-range high-speed contacts/fire-fights, but will the next conflict be the same? Is that conditioning good enough for long-range tabbing to battle carrying weight and engaging the enemy at range? No one can predict future conflict, but I'm more inclined that the between the two training methods, old-school leads to a fitness level that is more adaptable to either scenario than the new method.

As for recruits "blowing their knees" due to PT instruction, I dread to think how the recruits of today would have coped 35 years ago (God, was it that long ago!!!). We were truly beasted then, and suffered few injuries. Odd that.

As others have said, no one is suggesting "grit teeth, grin, carry on".
 
Don't do interval training for a sub-12 minute time, and don't train every day. It's advice like that which results in people getting injured due to overtraining.

Sub-12 minutes is easily achievable by just doing some easy jogging/running a couple times a week. I started at about 14 minutes and in about 6 weeks of running every other day am down to about 9:30, depending on traffic and how fresh my legs are. I never did any interval training, just doing a 2.4km timed run on monday, and a couple of distance runs (I worked my way up to 10km, 47min, but that's because I kind of enjoy the running, it's not needed for a sub-12 at all)
Really?
Amazing how any serious runner would incorporate a serious interval programme in to their training schedule.
 
How do you deal with pain when running? The onl;y thing holding me back from a sub 12 minute run is the fact my ankle/achilles tendon have started being very painful recently. I've just started training/running (I tested myself with no prior training and got 12:30) I did some interval training the other day and it feels as though my ankles and achilles tendon are just seizing up. Not sure if it's the sort of pain I should grit my teeth and bear or if I need to change something before I damage myself.

Any tips for managing this pain? I'm thin as a rake so I've been working on improving my BMI which is currently underweight (5'10 and about 57kg which has gone up to 62kg the past week or so) so I'm thinking the increased weight + increased physical exercise will take some time to get used to.

So, more rest days, just grin and bear it or something else altogether?
Like The_Duke said, most likely the pain you're experiencing is just stress from not having run a lot before.
Can't stress enough! Make sure you're running with good form without heel striking. There are hundreds of form videos and articles out there, go do some research.

If you can, get on some softer ground, and make sure your shoes are comfortable. Another thing that could be causing pain is lack of proper warm up. You should be doing a slow jog for 5-10 minutes, really focusing on drilling in that good form. Then building up the speed. At the end do the same, slow jog, slowing to a brisk walk for 10 minutes. I would suggest manually massaging your ankle area before and after to relieve tightness that may be contributing to pain.

If 1.5 miles maximal effort is causing you pain, then cut the intensity. Focus on building up some distance doing 3-8 miles at a more gentle pace. This will help build up your fitness while reducing the stress on joints and tendons. Also make sure you're running regularly, not doing 1.5 mile every 2 weeks, find a program that has you building up distance and speed. I believe there are good programs already in this thread, I won't try and contradict older and wiser heads, as I am not a pro runner.

Do you do any gym work? Try doing calf strengthening work, calf raise can be done on your stairs. Placing the front of the foot on the stairs and hanging the heel off the edge, lower the heel down then all the way up. Strengthening the calf will help support the Achilles. Better explanation with pictures here
More ankle strengthening exercises here - I love these! If you don't have a theraband, buy one, or use your hands to provide some resistance to the movements, especially when pointing the toes down away from you

If taking it easy for 4-6 weeks doesn't help, or the ankle pain starts to get worse, go see a physio/osteopath and see what they say. I have personally blown out an Achilles and the recovery was nearly 9 months (due to being a silly idiot trying to continue playing rugby), so you don't want to push it too hard.

All this is a very long way of saying, slow down, take it easy, build up your running slowly, but don't give up and sit at home cos you're 'injured', I doubt you're injured, just your muscles and tendons aren't used to the stress you're subjecting them too.

Not to blow smoke up places smoke ought not to be, but I've got civvie PT quals, strength and conditioning quals and have worked with student athletes for the last 2 years.
 
Mostly good advice above except for the bit about heel striking. Converting to a midfoot strike is not easy and can take 6+ months. If you just suddenly change from heel strike to mid foot, expect your calves to self destruct. It's a slow process and a taxing one.

There is no evidence which proves heel striking is bad, and there is no correct or incorrect way to land. The key thing to remember is to not over stride. We naturally tend to heel strike at lower speeds, and move to a midfoot/forefoot strike at a very fast pace.

In summary, don't worry about how you land, worry about running in a way that allows you to keep running. If you are over striding, correct that. You can help to do so by increasing cadence, and make sure your landing leg is not extended/straight on landing.
 
Good luck. If you do the 1.5m around the car park (running with the car park on your right hand side), starting/ending from the Mess (large building in shade, to your front) be careful of the storm drain on the "home straight". Cant explain much better than that.

If you do the outside course, its a straight run out and back. The turn at the half way point is a pain as it adds a couple of seconds off, but then so does having to slow down to go round four corners every lap on a 5-6 lap route.

BTW, can you note the name of the SMI, if he is a WO1 Royal Engineer.
 
@IanDupes and rougeone: for starters, be disgusted with yourselves, get angry, and get the miles in. Im 52, my PFA time is 9.30, and im not a runner.

There is no shortcut or magic bullet to improving run time, other than hard work. Run 6 days a week; for the next three weeks, start at running 3 miles, adding a mile each week (5 mile runs by week 3), 5 days a week. Run a best effort 1.5 mile one day each week. Week 4, improve your 5 mile run time. Week 5, concentrate on your 1.5 mile run time, 3 times a week, and 5 milers 3 times per week. Week 6 do 2 x 5 miles each week, and a best effort 1.5 miles. Ione the other two days, either fast 2-3 milers, or interval trainign.

Rest one day a week. Ensure you stretch properly before and after each run. And look at your diet.

I hate typing on ipads.
Largely good advise, but do not stretch before a run, ensure you're warmed up properly before you attempt any stretch. You can stretch after, or use a foam roller.
 
Largely good advise, but do not stretch before a run, ensure you're warmed up properly before you attempt any stretch. You can stretch after, or use a foam roller.
Are you quite sure?

Isn't dynamic stretching before a run part of a good warm up, intended to loosen up the muscles and avoid strains, and static stretching after a run intended to increase flexibility and give a greater range of movement?

And aren't foam rollers also often used before a run, to increase blood flow? Similar exercises before and after but, like dynamic stretching before and static stretching after, very different aims?
 
As for recruits "blowing their knees" due to PT instruction, I dread to think how the recruits of today would have coped 35 years ago (God, was it that long ago!!!). We were truly beasted then, and suffered few injuries. Odd that.
Not odd, so much as not correct. Injury rates were extremely and unnecessarily high (between 30 and 60% depending on unit). Progressive training means less injuries and less wastage to achieve the same results - there's a difference between beasting and breaking.

Today's population is generally less fit though, quantifiably, so you have to change your methods to allow for that, but that's hardly the fault of the individuals - and aren't we talking about pre-recruit training preparation here anyway?
 
Here's a question, currently I go-to the Gym 5 days a week, for 45 minutes each session, I alternate between Pump, Cycle, Kettlebell and Fat burn (to remove my belly fat), is this a good way of gaining fitness, alongside a diet change?
 
Here's a question, currently I go-to the Gym 5 days a week, for 45 minutes each session, I alternate between Pump, Cycle, Kettlebell and Fat burn (to remove my belly fat), is this a good way of gaining fitness, alongside a diet change?
If you go to a gym I'd suggest you ask one of the trainers at the gym - that's what you're paying them for.

Much of the information given here may be not only mis-informed but also not specific to you.
 
If you go to a gym I'd suggest you ask one of the trainers at the gym - that's what you're paying them for.

Much of the information given here may be not only mis-informed but also not specific to you.
Indeed, the class schedule is based off of me wanting to join the Army, I gave them the minimum requirements to beat (1.5 miles in under 13:15 minutes, carry 2x 20kg jerry cans 60 metres and lift 25kg).

But just wanted thoughts and opinions from others who passed the selection and what they did for exercise
 
But just wanted thoughts and opinions from others who passed the selection and what they did for exercise.
Mine was so long ago that leaves me out!

Bear in mind that what someone else did may have no bearing at all on what you need to do as they may have started from a very different position. My only comment would be that I hope you're aiming for rather better than minimum standards - for example 95% of male recruits pass at infantry level (12:45 run), most a lot better than that, so if you can only pass at the minimum of 13:15 you're going to find things a lot harder than most and you also stand a much higher chance of being injured.
 
Mine was so long ago that leaves me out!

Bear in mind that what someone else did may have no bearing at all on what you need to do as they may have started from a very different position. My only comment would be that I hope you're aiming for rather better than minimum standards - for example 95% of male recruits pass at infantry level (12:45 run), most a lot better than that, so if you can only pass at the minimum of 13:15 you're going to find things a lot harder than most and you also stand a much higher chance of being injured.
95% pass rate? That makes me feel a lot more confident, my fitness level is improving, I worked an active job before I started thinking about the Army (I worked in a Stables with Horses), basically I'm aiming for 12 minutes 15 seconds, that is a realistic goal for me; is that pretty much keeping up with the pack of potential recruits whilst at the run or do you go individually rather then everyone lined up at once?
 

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