FITNESS Qs & ADSC 1.5 mile run times

It seems interval is the way to go, from what I've read here and other forums so will be giving that a go.
It's not really. You don't have to train fast to run fast; not when we're talking 1.5 miles, or longer. There's a place for speed training,...

Look, there's two fitness systems; aerobic and anaerobic. To be able to run at a level of endurance-speed you need a good fitness base; your aerobic engine. You train this by running at a low level, but by volume, obviously building the volume over time.

Speed work, like intervals can be added once you build that engine; speed work is like adding a turbo to the engine.

And you don't want to fit a turbo to a small engine.

So my suggestion is to increase your mileage, run all your runs at an easy pace, and build volume. After a few months, add speed work, like intervals, fartlek, strides, track work, and hill repeats. Keep speedwork to 10 to 20 percent of your overall volume; do more and you'll end up broken.

Rest is important too; that's when the adaptation to exercise takes place.

My fastest 5k was ran while I was doing 100% low heart rate training, while training for an ultra marathon; i.e. lots of slow miles. As I say, you don't need to train fast to be able to race/run fast. Speed isn't a problem for most folk; it's maintaining that speed over distance, and that's where your aerobic system comes into play.
 
It's not really. You don't have to train fast to run fast; not when we're talking 1.5 miles, or longer. There's a place for speed training,...

Look, there's two fitness systems; aerobic and anaerobic. To be able to run at a level of endurance-speed you need a good fitness base; your aerobic engine. You train this by running at a low level, but by volume, obviously building the volume over time.

Speed work, like intervals can be added once you build that engine; speed work is like adding a turbo to the engine.

And you don't want to fit a turbo to a small engine.

So my suggestion is to increase your mileage, run all your runs at an easy pace, and build volume. After a few months, add speed work, like intervals, fartlek, strides, track work, and hill repeats. Keep speedwork to 10 to 20 percent of your overall volume; do more and you'll end up broken.

Rest is important too; that's when the adaptation to exercise takes place.

My fastest 5k was ran while I was doing 100% low heart rate training, while training for an ultra marathon; i.e. lots of slow miles. As I say, you don't need to train fast to be able to race/run fast. Speed isn't a problem for most folk; it's maintaining that speed and that's where your aerobic system comes into play.
What he said.
 
@IanDupes and rougeone: for starters, be disgusted with yourselves, get angry, and get the miles in. Im 52, my PFA time is 9.30, and im not a runner.

There is no shortcut or magic bullet to improving run time, other than hard work. Run 6 days a week; for the next three weeks, start at running 3 miles, adding a mile each week (5 mile runs by week 3), 5 days a week. Run a best effort 1.5 mile one day each week. Week 4, improve your 5 mile run time. Week 5, concentrate on your 1.5 mile run time, 3 times a week, and 5 milers 3 times per week. Week 6 do 2 x 5 miles each week, and a best effort 1.5 miles. Ione the other two days, either fast 2-3 milers, or interval trainign.

Rest one day a week. Ensure you stretch properly before and after each run. And look at your diet.

I hate typing on ipads.
 
Does anybody have any tips for the interview, if I get to that stage any questions that they may possibly ask at all. Any Info would be appreciated. My Choices are Royal Signals with a path to Intel eventually.
 
Does anybody have any tips for the interview, if I get to that stage any questions that they may possibly ask at all. Any Info would be appreciated.
The interview is a discussion, not a grilling. The results from each activity of your assessment will be discussed and areas for improvement identified. You should be given the outcome of the assessment (pass, defer, etc) and your grade (assuming all results are in).

The interviewer will ensure that you know what the next steps are, regardless of outcome. Job choice recommendations can be made by the interviewer if you fail to meet the criteria for the ones you have chosen or if the assessment team believes you may be suited to another job.

It is a good idea to be familiar with the ins and outs of your job choice and military life. Like any job interview you should be aware of what you are signing up for.

It is a two way process, you will be asked things and you can also ask things.
 
I new you would answer @TheAssessor thanks for that. I have my D day on April the 3rd. Got my mile and half to under 14 mins so other than failing the medical I hope it be ok was at a pda recently and went ok bare the run but been working on run every day and achieved 13:30 the other day I no still poor but I think a good achievement for a 40 year old.
 
still poor but I think a good achievement for a 40 year old.
Not really, no. I am nearly 10 years older, eat and drink too much, have knackered knees and back due to service and would still be in a fair bit ahead of you.

You have been posting about your weight and run time on here for some months now.

Somewhere within your training process you are not being honest with yourself because within that time you could have made much bigger improvements. Do you keep an honest training diary?

You are not training as often as you say you are, or as hard as you could be, or cleaning up your diet as much as you could - or all three.
 
I hope you're not pleased with that. My missis who is 45 years old (and Welsh) could beat you by over 3 minutes.

A good way of getting faster, quicker, is losing weight.

What's your BMI?
Aerodynamics is a really big part of it too. Have you tried growing a giant pointy nose? Could probably cut a good minute off that time.



On a serious note losing weight is definitely a good idea if you can afford to. Less weight = less energy required to move. And get on a real running programme if you're not already- don't make it up yourself.
 
Aerodynamics is a really big part of it too. Have you tried growing a giant pointy nose? Could probably cut a good minute off that time.
My Missis does a 5k parkrun in 21 minutes something; that's a hair over 3 miles. Half of that is 10.5 mins, so I reckon she could do 1.5 miles in a bit less.

'Short stuff' isn't her bag though; she likes it long and hard (phnaar); she's ran and won a 100 mile ultra marathon (won as in beating all the other females), and came 10th overall; so she beat most of the blokes too. She's won, or came 2nd, 3rd, or 4th in quite a few other shorter ultra marathons too.

I'm just guessing the 'pointy nose' is a reference to Pinocchio and fibbers. I'm not; she's a decent runner; it's her 'thing'.
 
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My Missis does a 5k parkrun in 21 minutes something; that's a hair over 3 miles. Half of that is 10.5 mins, so I reckon she could do 1.5 miles in a bit less.

'Short stuff' isn't her bag though; she likes it long and hard (phnaar); she's ran and won a 100 mile ultra marathon (won as in beating all the other females), and came 10th overall; so she beat most of the blokes too. She's won, or came 2nd, 3rd, or 4th in quite a few other shorter ultra marathons too.

I'm just guessing the 'pointy nose' is a reference to Pinocchio and fibbers. I'm not; she's a decent runner; it's her 'thing'.
Haha no sir, you're reading too much into my very low level joke. Didn't mean anything by it :p
 
I new you would answer @TheAssessor thanks for that. I have my D day on April the 3rd. Got my mile and half to under 14 mins so other than failing the medical I hope it be ok was at a pda recently and went ok bare the run but been working on run every day and achieved 13:30 the other day I no still poor but I think a good achievement for a 40 year old.
Being brutally honest, that is not an achievement for a 40 year old, and certainly not for one who has "for some months" being training. In the past few years Bretheronton_lad and I have both posted comprehensive training programmes for lads to pass the BFT (PFA), starting from scratch, with just 4-6 weeks training. To the point where we both tired of answering the same question - which is "how do I pass the 1.5mile run without putting any effort in". My routine is the lazy man's way, had been tried and tested since 19eighty-dot (or 18eighty-dot according to some wags). Both work. Both require effort.

You have ten days? to reduce your time by 1 minute. It is doable, but you need to hit the pavement for 9 out days out of the next 10, because 13.30 is borderline, 13.31 is a fail.
 
Did post this in a separate thread but realised this one is for fitness questions.


I’ve got my Phase 1 intake this month on the 23rd so I’ve not got much time left before I’m on my travels to start bettering myself.

Since finding out my intake date I’ve been working hard to try and improve my fitness to the best it could possibly be for when I arrive at pirbright. However I’ve now got tonsillitis (3rd/4th day) and I’m worried if I don’t run I’ll lose my progress. I’ve heard that PT at phase 1 is intense anyway because some people turn up in poor condition, so I know I’ll improve my fitness whilst I’m there.

However I’m worried that if my fitness takes a massive hit due to my illness, will I be discharged from the army for not being “fighting fit”?

Cheers for the help.
 
Did post this in a separate thread but realised this one is for fitness questions.


Snip
It takes a good couple of weeks to start losing conditioning, I often find I run far better (it's even more pronounced with cycling) after I've taken a week off with fresh legs. A month you might lose a little bit but tonsillitis clears up after a week, 10 days tops.

Don't worry about it, I know loads of people who just stopped training completely after selection (as long as they didn't have months and months to wait) just to avoid risking injury before their intake. You'll have another medical on your first week of phase 1 along with the same fitness tests you did at selection just to get a base line to measure your monthly progress against, but I don't think you can actually fail it unless you are legitimately injured.
 
What time of day is the run done at ADSC?

I’m currently running between 8pm and 9pm, would training in the evening have a detrimental affect on my run time if it’s taken in the morning or afternoon?

Genuine questions... or am I overthinking it?
 
What time of day is the run done at ADSC?

I’m currently running between 8pm and 9pm, would training in the evening have a detrimental affect on my run time if it’s taken in the morning or afternoon?

Genuine questions... or am I overthinking it?
Overthinking it mate, you'll probably run faster on the day just due to adreneline and being able to follow someone else's pace. I believe the 2.4km run is on the first day's afternoon, but depending on the timekeeping it might be the morning of the second day before you do it, I know my brother had to do his on the second day.
 

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