Fitness Programmes

#3
40 pushups, 50 situps a day and 8 miles twice a week is a good start.

Nice thing is you can do all of that without a fitness centre or such.

Buy proper running shoes, though. You don't want irritated achiles tendons or shinsplint.


Ta'


Kaye
 
#8
barbarasson said:
Although often easier said than done.
I'll second that last one!
 
#11
Sapukay said:
Don't run with weight on though.

Q, I'd like, knee, left, one for the use of.....

Then how do you train for speedmarching?


Ta'

Kaye
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#12
By running in proper running shoes to improve CV fitness, and tabbing with boots and weight, ideally off road. The tabbing should not form the major part of your training, and should be progressively built up.
 
#13
The_Duke said:
By running in proper running shoes to improve CV fitness, and tabbing with boots and weight, ideally off road. The tabbing should not form the major part of your training, and should be progressively built up.

I think all running should ideally be done off road. It is much better for your ankles, knees and lower back.
It must be said though, that off road is best done on unpaved roads of in open forests. Darting over a moor or through a pasture can get you stepping into holes and fcuking op your ankles anyway! :idea:

Tabbing: 3 Mph.
Running: 8 Mph.

Cheers,

Kaye
 
#14
For my fitness program I went off the Royal Marines Pre-PRMC booklet (aquired when I applied, not to walt it up).

I found it gave me above good all round fitness and strong upper body strength. It's only a basic program too that is easy to complete and it isn't one that require marathon runs or some other extreme number...

It also requires a good healthy balanced diet...

If you can't get hold of one and you'd like to see the program it should be somewhere on the internet along with the PARAS version of their Pre-selection training. If you still can't find it drop us a pm and I'll try and dig it out for you.
 
#16
It's easier said than done - a lot of city dwellers don't have the luxury of wooded running areas. Tabbing is a definite no-no. However, as stated, a good pair of trainers suited to your gait should take the worst out of road running. (there's a load of threads on the Health & Fitness Forum about this)

Fat burning is done when you're heart is pumping at 60-80% of your VO2 Max (220 minus your age will give you this i.e. if you are 21, your VO2 Max is 199), so if your pulse is 160 after a run, you've been working hard and will start seeing results.

Always aim to run for at least half an hour to get the benefit out of it. Build up slowly, a few miles 2-3 times a week to start with. Try & fit in sets of press-ups and sit-ups in the days between runs just to build up your overall strength.

Good luck.
 
#17
eSeL said:
Fat burning is done when you're heart is pumping at 60-80% of your VO2 Max (220 minus your age will give you this i.e. if you are 21, your VO2 Max is 199), so if your pulse is 160 after a run, you've been working hard and will start seeing results.
Actually, the 220 minus your age method is very rough, so try and get your max measured at a gym if you're going to work from pulse rate. Also your pulse rate measured AFTER your workout will vary enormously depending on how fit you are and hense how quick you recover, so if you're going to use pulse rate as a measure you need to buy a pulse meter with recording facility ( about 60 squid), and check how you fared during the run.

Running is pretty good at fat burning without actually checking your pulse, as you have to put in some effort in order to run, unlike cycling, where it's reasonably easy to cruise around all day (on flat ground)wiyhout over exerting.
 
#18
Running on heartrate is a very good method when you have fitness instructor to help you interpret what's going on.

When you're going to run for yourself I've always kept to the method that says: If can sing a spam cadence you're going too slow and if you cannot finish a sentencte you're going too fast.
This method always works fine for me on an eight- or ten miler.

Apart from that I think that running till you fail every now and then is a good way of keeping tabs on how you've developped. Just like doing pushups untill you keep pushing but don't move anymore gives you a nice indiciation of what you're capable of.

There are all kinds of schedules available, a lot of them for free on the internet. Interval training is the best way of building up stamina after that: Just keep stretching your pace and the distance.

Don't forget to have fun doing so! It shouldn't be a chore, otherwise you won't last!


Cheers,

Kaye
 
#19
I swear by hill interval training; even if you can only find a stretch it takes a minute and a half to run fast up by repeating 10 times a good workout.
ET
 

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