First Aid kit for a car

In preparing his car First Aid kit, has Themanwho:

  • Done the right thing - BZ!

    Votes: 32 61.5%
  • Gone a little bit OTT, but the idea is sound (you saddo).

    Votes: 12 23.1%
  • A bit scary, but erm okay... Why don't you join St Johns Ambulance?

    Votes: 2 3.8%
  • Mummy, keep the scary man away from my sore bits!

    Votes: 2 3.8%
  • One step away from a prepper's stash in the woods - get a fcuking life.

    Votes: 4 7.7%

  • Total voters
    52

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Depends how far you want to take it but consider

CPR face shields

Sandwich bags with handles (put valuables in and attach to person.)

Toe tags (laminated card with string through it to write up what you’ve done so can give a HOTO to paramedics)

Headtorch & cyalumes.

Maybe consider some Sam splints and cling film to put on burns to keep clean.

Plus I assume in your car you have 2x hi-vis vests, a fire extinguisher and a decent warning triangle.

all absolute overkill until you need it. which you might on a country road with little phone signal. Have had someone keel over behind me and having to give mouth to mouth, I was glad I had a face shield in my wallet. A mate had to look after someone for 20 minutes as he and his doctor wife were first on the scene. He said it was annoying how little they could do to help despite their knowledge as they had no kit.

obviously doing too much when not qualified is not a good idea.

One of my former colleagues, a trauma surgeon by trade, had been on the Tube train that got bombed - and was called to give evidence at the enquiry.

All he had with him was a biro, he said. When sh1t happens, it comes at you like a piano falling off a building.

All the training and experience you have boils down to doing the best you can, with what you have to hand.

That said, bravo for putting a decent kit together.....I will roust out my own similar green pouch and check off how lacklustre it is....still have a couple of Catsticks and a shrink-wrapped wound dressing somewhere .

( I have toyed with enrolling with St John's ever since I worked with a maniacal St.J lifer in Victory Building back in the previous Century )
 
Without wanting to sound a right twat, remeber that your own safety must always come first, fftrs coppers and boss hoggs gang have all lost guys ar road/motorway accidents.
PPE is even more important than ever, and so is self disclipine if your not careful your end scratching your nose or wiping your brow with your gloved hand.https://www.globus.co.uk/how-to-safely-remove-disposable-gloves
 

A.N.Other

War Hero
Without wanting to sound a right twat, remeber that your own safety must always come first, fftrs coppers and boss hoggs gang have all lost guys ar road/motorway accidents.
PPE is even more important than ever, and so is self disclipine if your not careful your end scratching your nose or wiping your brow with your gloved hand.https://www.globus.co.uk/how-to-safely-remove-disposable-gloves
DRSABC and being on the lookout for the D(anger) is very important. Look out for yourself.

I had a good example a few years ago when I was MR medical director managing medical cover at a trail running event. The organiser rolled an overloaded landrover with 14 bodies inside. We had more than 14 casualties, as one of the bystanders ran to the landy to help. He ran down a slope, went arse over tit and broke his ankle.

Never run towards the cas site and always look out for the Danger to you and others.

Another, more tragic, example was in the States 20 years ago. State Trooper arrives at an RTC. People laying on the ground and are unresponsive. He didn't make the link between the bodies on the ground and the tanker involved in the RTC. He walked into the cloud of ammonia and basically dropped down dead.

Vid of RTC
 
DRSABC and being on the lookout for the D(anger) is very important. Look out for yourself.

I had a good example a few years ago when I was MR medical director managing medical cover at a trail running event. The organiser rolled an overloaded landrover with 14 bodies inside. We had more than 14 casualties, as one of the bystanders ran to the landy to help. He ran down a slope, went arse over tit and broke his ankle.

Never run towards the cas site and always look out for the Danger to you and others.

Another, more tragic, example was in the States 20 years ago. State Trooper arrives at an RTC. People laying on the ground and are unresponsive. He didn't make the link between the bodies on the ground and the tanker involved in the RTC. He walked into the cloud of ammonia and basically dropped down dead.

Vid of RTC
Not much curls my toes and makes me switch off but that did. Horrible.
 
DRSABC and being on the lookout for the D(anger) is very important. Look out for yourself.

I had a good example a few years ago when I was MR medical director managing medical cover at a trail running event. The organiser rolled an overloaded landrover with 14 bodies inside. We had more than 14 casualties, as one of the bystanders ran to the landy to help. He ran down a slope, went arse over tit and broke his ankle.

Never run towards the cas site and always look out for the Danger to you and others.

Another, more tragic, example was in the States 20 years ago. State Trooper arrives at an RTC. People laying on the ground and are unresponsive. He didn't make the link between the bodies on the ground and the tanker involved in the RTC. He walked into the cloud of ammonia and basically dropped down dead.

Vid of RTC
And that is why we always check out the scene before leaving our vehicle. We have binoculars so we can check the hazchem board from a safe distance.
 

Jammy66

War Hero
A couple of weeks ago I was travelling down the M40, when a large cloud of dust and smoke appeared about half a mile in front of me. I pulled over, grabbed the first aid kit from the boot and ran up to the accident site involving an artic truck, a transit van and two car, all badly mangled. Thankfully there were no fatalities or life threatening injuries; I helped a couple of people out of vehicles, and started giving first aid to a girl with a minor head injury (cut above the eye, bleeding freely). I opened my first aid kit ( similar to the type below):
View attachment 513605
It had virtually nothing of any use, a small strip of fabric plaster, some wipes and nothing for anything more than a finger cut or knee graze level of injury The only useful content was a survival blanket, which I wrapped around the casualty, whilst I tried to mop the blood away and stick the plaster on the cut. Fortunately a squaddie arrived with a handful of FFDs one of which I quickly applied, just in time for plod and ambulances to turn up.

With thirty years of soldiering and ten years of civvy first aider training under my belt, I had no excuse for being so unequipped for dealing with a serious casualty event. I'd bought the shonky car first aid kit years before, mentally ticked it off my list of things to do and forgotten about it, which considering I keep a well stocked first aid kit in my workshop, another in my house and another smaller kit in my range bag is unforgivable. For the remainder of my journey I thought about this, and decided I needed to get a decent kit for the car which could deal with serious injuries when I got home. A quick google got me sucking my teeth at the price of decent first aid kits, however, that thirty years of soldiering has left me with a fair amount of relevant buckshee kit mouldering in the loft, so I thought a DIY effort might do the job. I bought a cheap canvas haversack (£8 ), some basic stuff, (plasters, sticking tape, scissors - another £10), a couple of saddo badges (£10), and put together a reasonably suitable first aid kit, without going totally OTT or breaking the bank.

Behold the magnificence:

View attachment 513609

(Mug included for scale)

Contents (in waterproof containers):

5 x First Field Dressings
3x gel burns dressings
1 x Tourniquet
3 x tri bandages
4 x bandages
1 x eye dressing
1 x roll fabric tape
Vaseline (In case I'm feeling lucky)
1 x roll micropore tape
3 x pairs surgical gloves
1 x pack sticking plasters
Surgical wipes (hods of them)
Syringe for eye wash
Lip balm
2 x bottles Hand gel
3 x Survival blankets
Only just seen this. In a previous job I was tasked with putting together a first aid kit to be sold as part of the range of car accessories we offered.

I wasn't a first aider, and I had to work within a budget price per unit. I took a course at the Red Cross and met various people for advice on what or not to include in a kit.

The key point was considering that the typical user won't know what they're doing, so I kept to simple self adhesive dressings mostly or dressings/bandages combined. Antiseptic wipes, disposible gloves, some surgical tape, plasters etc., plus some very basic quick to read instructions (large print on a laminated sheet).

It can be just as bad to give the wrong first aid as not giving any, unless you've had some basic training at least.
 
One of my former colleagues, a trauma surgeon by trade, had been on the Tube train that got bombed - and was called to give evidence at the enquiry.

All he had with him was a biro, he said. When sh1t happens, it comes at you like a piano falling off a building.

All the training and experience you have boils down to doing the best you can, with what you have to hand.

That said, bravo for putting a decent kit together.....I will roust out my own similar green pouch and check off how lacklustre it is....still have a couple of Catsticks and a shrink-wrapped wound dressing somewhere .

( I have toyed with enrolling with St John's ever since I worked with a maniacal St.J lifer in Victory Building back in the previous Century )

I used to attend St. Johns in Milton Keynes annually to do the weekend outdoor first aid course. Well worth it as an annual refresher.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Only just seen this. In a previous job I was tasked with putting together a first aid kit to be sold as part of the range of car accessories we offered.

I wasn't a first aider, and I had to work within a budget price per unit. I took a course at the Red Cross and met various people for advice on what or not to include in a kit.

The key point was considering that the typical user won't know what they're doing, so I kept to simple self adhesive dressings mostly or dressings/bandages combined. Antiseptic wipes, disposible gloves, some surgical tape, plasters etc., plus some very basic quick to read instructions (large print on a laminated sheet).

It can be just as bad to give the wrong first aid as not giving any, unless you've had some basic training at least.
The kit in my car is for me and my family to use, we've all got some first aid training.
 

Yokel

LE
The one thing I wish I had in my car would be a face mask for CPR, or one of those rigid masks that goes over the face. I usually carry a small torch, and a few litres of water.

I should carry a high vis vest, and I would prefer to have some of those grey bandages - from Israel? I also usually have something like duck tape for emergency use.
 
And that is why we always check out the scene before leaving our vehicle. We have binoculars so we can check the hazchem board from a safe distance.
the 1,2,3 rule is good
Step 1 One casualty Approach using NORMAL procedures CBRN contamination unlikely Step 2 Two casualties Approach with CAUTION, consider all options CBRN contamination possible Report on arrival, update control If possible or suspected, follow advice for STEP 3 Step 3+ Three casualties or more DO NOT APPROACH – CBRN INCIDENT CONTAMINATION LIKELY Identify hazards Control scene Give METHANE report as soon as possible Direct ambulant casualties to place of safety Make risk assessment and provide help to nonambulant casualties if benefit outweighs risk using minimum personnel & appropriate PPE • do NOT compromise your own safety or that of your colleagues or the public • remember that the emergency services have staff trained and equipped to deal with CBRN
of course its more than likely not to be a CBRN event but the point is own safety first
Do you not have MDT on your vehicles boss hog?
 
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We don't, we do however get personal tablets issued, I've downloaded the dangerous goods and JESIP apps and installed them on my tablet. ;)
 
The one thing I wish I had in my car would be a face mask for CPR, or one of those rigid masks that goes over the face. I usually carry a small torch, and a few litres of water.

I should carry a high vis vest, and I would prefer to have some of those grey bandages - from Israel? I also usually have something like duck tape for emergency use.
Only quacks use "Duck tape".
Get yourself some "Duct tape"
 

Yokel

LE
We don't, we do however get personal tablets issued, I've downloaded the dangerous goods and JESIP apps and installed them on my tablet. ;)

I used to know one of your blokes and heard some funny stories - like the bloke with false legs walking down the motorway and he had to keep going as he had walking legs on - no good for standing.

Do you count as either category 1 or 2 responders under the civil contingencies legislation? What about HAZCHEM and CBRN?
 
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Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I used to know one of your blokes and heard some funny stories - like the bloke with false legs walking down the motorway and he had to keep going as he had walking legs on - no good for standing.

Do you count as either category 1 or 2 responders under the civil contingencies legislation?
We're Cat 2 responders, which I know is strange as a lot of the time we're first on scene. I remember being asked once if were an emergency service, I replied no, we're a service that responds to emergencies. ;) we leave anything like hazchem to the fire brigade.
 
And that is why we always check out the scene before leaving our vehicle. We have binoculars so we can check the hazchem board from a safe distance.

And Hazchem boards are quite a recent thing. 40/50 years ago nobody had a clue what was being carried - not even the drivers.
 

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