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First Aid kit for a car

In preparing his car First Aid kit, has Themanwho:

  • Done the right thing - BZ!

    Votes: 24 60.0%
  • Gone a little bit OTT, but the idea is sound (you saddo).

    Votes: 8 20.0%
  • A bit scary, but erm okay... Why don't you join St Johns Ambulance?

    Votes: 2 5.0%
  • Mummy, keep the scary man away from my sore bits!

    Votes: 2 5.0%
  • One step away from a prepper's stash in the woods - get a fcuking life.

    Votes: 4 10.0%

  • Total voters
    40
Unless you really fancy the victim?

Would having one of those hard plastic masks you put over the casualty's mouth and nose and blow into a tube?...…
You'd still have your own face surrounded by the casualty's exhaled air. IIRC Mountain Rescue, Lifeboats etc, all had guidance on CPR and Covid very early, like back in March.
 
Under no circumstances place a casualty in your own car even if pissing down, if they then complain of neck/back pain the chances are your going to lose your roof
it happens trust me
Oh yes! ;)
Screenshot_20201020_213230.jpg
 
The first thing is to prevent further injury.

Another issue is what to say during the 999 call. I think it useful to remember LIONEL:

LOCATION
INCIDENT
OTHER SERVICES REQUIRED
NUMBER OF CASUALTIES
EXTENT OF INJURIES
LOCATION (repeated)

But try to clear their airway or staunch major bleeding first. Unless you have medical training then keep you assessments simple.

You can assess consciousness on the AVPU scale.

ALERT
Responds to VOICE
Responds to PAIN
UNRESPONSIVE

Likewise I guess the rule of nines is too complex for a first aide, simply report what body part is burnt and how deep it looks.

These have now changed, instead of LIONEL, it's now METHANE.


And AVPU has changed to ACVPU = alert, confusion, voice, pain, unresponsive.
 
Good point! Job FA training was DR STAB or somesuch
D anger (live wires/fire/vehicles)
R esponse (Oi you! slacker on the ground, what are you up to?)
S hout (You there! C'mere!)
T ell (I need you to phone 999: unconscious male, breathing, suspect broken leg. Tell me what I just said, go phone & come back)
A irways
B reathing
We use
Danger
Response
Catastrophic bleed
Airway
Breathing
(signs of) Circulation
 
So what you're saying is if you've got an estate car, lay them down to one side in the boot with the back seat down? That way the backboard can be slid in beside them and they get lifted out without letting Trumpton have free rein.
 
Just lay them down in the open and cover them with a coat, blanket etc to keep them warm. I have seen a picture of one of our brand new Toyota Land Cruisers with the roof cut off.
 
Chatting with a Doctor friend of mine (a Mountain Rescue Paramedic in his spare time) he does not recommend anything to do with Mouth to Mouth resuscitation in the current pandemic climate.
Came out as advice years ago - Vinnie Jones did an advert on it. Essentially, most people get put off starting anything because they don’t want to do the rescue breaths first. It’s also apparently rare to find a non-breathing casualty with a pulse. I’m sure a medic can post the time from stopping breathing to heart stopping. However, the event I described above when a woman collapsed behind me saw her fit, then stop breathing. I went into rescue breaths but no compressions as she had a pulse. The shop first-aider came along and being 19 yrs old and at 20,000 feet, i gallantly let her take over. It was only when she went to start doing chest compressions that I stopped panicking enough to point out the woman had a pulse and the first-aider was about to get an expensive hand puppet. Thankfully the woman started breathing again at that point. I understand the dilemma for advice givers though. The situation I was in was far less common and undoubtedly people will have died because a first responder didn’t want to give rescue breaths and so stayed quiet or didn’t just do compressions.
 

Yokel

LE
These have now changed, instead of LIONEL, it's now METHANE.


And AVPU has changed to ACVPU = alert, confusion, voice, pain, unresponsive.

ACVPU makes sense because you need to tell the difference between fully conscious and disoriented. A casualty who is lucid but becomes confused needs to be flagged up ASAP.

METHANE is going to be harder to learn and remember.

Nobody has mentioned carrying for treating burns.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
ACVPU makes sense because you need to tell the difference between fully conscious and disoriented. A casualty who is lucid but becomes confused needs to be flagged up ASAP.

METHANE is going to be harder to learn and remember.

Nobody has mentioned carrying for treating burns.
Ahem:
"3 x gel burns dressings"
 
Nobody has mentioned carrying for treating burns.
Thought I’d suggested cling film. That’s the last thing I was told to use, after applying water. Definitely no lotions, potions or creams.

has it changed?
 
ACVPU makes sense because you need to tell the difference between fully conscious and disoriented. A casualty who is lucid but becomes confused needs to be flagged up ASAP.

METHANE is going to be harder to learn and remember.

Nobody has mentioned carrying for treating burns.
METHANE is easy for us to remember as it means all services attending a major incident on the motorway are all singing from the same hymn sheet.
 

Yokel

LE
Yes I did see that, but does burn gel remove heat from the wound or simply cover it and keep it sterile? Water can also wash off chemicals such as spilt oil or fuels, or splashed/throw acid.

Not to mention dehydration and heat injuries, or washing dirt away from wound areas.
 
Came out as advice years ago - Vinnie Jones did an advert on it. Essentially, most people get put off starting anything because they don’t want to do the rescue breaths first. It’s also apparently rare to find a non-breathing casualty with a pulse. I’m sure a medic can post the time from stopping breathing to heart stopping. However, the event I described above when a woman collapsed behind me saw her fit, then stop breathing. I went into rescue breaths but no compressions as she had a pulse. The shop first-aider came along and being 19 yrs old and at 20,000 feet, i gallantly let her take over. It was only when she went to start doing chest compressions that I stopped panicking enough to point out the woman had a pulse and the first-aider was about to get an expensive hand puppet. Thankfully the woman started breathing again at that point. I understand the dilemma for advice givers though. The situation I was in was far less common and undoubtedly people will have died because a first responder didn’t want to give rescue breaths and so stayed quiet or didn’t just do compressions.
Ignoring the Covid rules... we don't do initial rescue breaths either unless from submerged or children.
 
That still applies. ;)
Out of interest, what are the common injuries you come across, and how often does a car crash on your stretch, and how often are there serious injuries? I’ve done a few lengthy weekly commutes in my time but rarely came across a very bad accident. Saw lots of three cars that had all gone into the back of each other at max about 20-30mph on the M25. No doubt driving too close/on phones. Very little observable physical damage to the cars but two lanes of the M25 closed on a Friday.
 
I asked my girlfriend about the kit they have to carry here in Germany. As well as an in date first aid kit which is checked when they have their version of MOT (TUF Test I think) they must have sufficient hi vis vests for all the occupants within the car (not kept in the boot) plus the usual warning triangle.
She carrys four vests.
 
Yes I did see that, but does burn gel remove heat from the wound or simply cover it and keep it sterile? Water can also wash off chemicals such as spilt oil or fuels, or splashed/throw acid.

Not to mention dehydration and heat injuries, or washing dirt away from wound areas.
Before being disbanded, Red Cross event first aid training advised not to use burn gel, just water. ;)
 
Out of interest, what are the common injuries you come across, and how often does a car crash on your stretch, and how often are there serious injuries? I’ve done a few lengthy weekly commutes in my time but rarely came across a very bad accident. Saw lots of three cars that had all gone into the back of each other at max about 20-30mph on the M25. No doubt driving too close/on phones. Very little observable physical damage to the cars but two lanes of the M25 closed on a Friday.
The last fatal I attended on my patch was earlier this year when a police car crashed and the officer sadly lost his life. I can't put a figure on RTCs, some weeks I'll attend several, then I'll have nothing for months. A number of more serious ones have happened when I've been off duty. Thanks to the design standards of modern vehicles, injuries tend to be minor. I've attended what appear to be serious RTCs where the driver has walked away with minor scratches, and other times where it's very minor damage and the driver didn't survive.
 

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