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First Aid kit for a car

In preparing his car First Aid kit, has Themanwho:

  • Done the right thing - BZ!

    Votes: 31 60.8%
  • Gone a little bit OTT, but the idea is sound (you saddo).

    Votes: 12 23.5%
  • A bit scary, but erm okay... Why don't you join St Johns Ambulance?

    Votes: 2 3.9%
  • Mummy, keep the scary man away from my sore bits!

    Votes: 2 3.9%
  • One step away from a prepper's stash in the woods - get a fcuking life.

    Votes: 4 7.8%

  • Total voters
    51

A.N.Other

War Hero
I'm sure that Boss hog will be along in a minute to give advice , whilst i agree with your comments, and yes even just keeping an airway open can make a life saving difference, motorways are deadly, fftrs, coppers and highways officers have all been killed on jobs on motorways.
Agreed. Like anything you carry out a dynamic risk assessment before acting. It's worth doing a First Bike on Scene course. It's meant for bikers and covers basic first aid and RTC scene management and safety.
 
at work we have a fully comprehensive 1st aid kit-



its calculated as 1 reel per 10 men, so this kit is suitable 1000 employees

if the tape won't stop the bleeding..... after we've clocked you out we'll phone an ambulance
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
After years in the army, further education, transport and logistics, security, and vehicle recovery, all you need is a phone and an accurate knowledge of where you are. Then leave it to professionals who are, allegedly, trained and equipped to do the job.

In your example you've abandoned your car, on a motorway, to help somebody else. Admirable, but causes as many problems as it solves.
First rule of first aid, don't become a casualty yourself.
I disagree. Someone who has an arterial bleed or stops breathing needs immediate intervention or all the first responders will require is a body bag.
 
….Hi viz vests that others have mentioned are a good idea too, no point risking not being seen while you are at the side of the road treating someone else :)

I'd suggest the long sleeved version - the vests are too easily obscured if you're bending/kneeling.
 
Packet of Polos and one of those CPR mouth shield thingies and as much morphine as you can lay your hands on.

OK, the Polos was a joke.

Sweets are a good idea for diabetic problems.

Can't see on the list a notebook and pencil/pen. Suggest something thick like a 2B for easier scribbling if there's rain or dirt.
 
@supermatelot might be able to say which bit of information to 999 callers forget most often, and what mnemonic is best.

Speak loudly and clearly. It may help to speak slowly. When help arrives, remember to tell the Paramedics/doctor/etc MIST:

Mechanism of injury
Injury found
Signs and symptoms
Treatment Given
No need to remember mnemonics imo. If you call police you will be asked the information required according to situation presented. Of course, there are so many variables that could affect grading- any injuries/ weapons- if an rtc any spills/trapped/obstruction.
 

BaldBaBoon

War Hero
Having been a response officer in London and dealt with much stabby silliness, I do have a very good first aid kit in my car and an identical one in the wife's car.

Stored in the passenger Footwell just in case you need it from within the car, or the boot is just gone in a crash

4 x trauma dressings
1 Torniquet
Breath Mask...like the oxygen mask affair.
Tampons....insert type for plugging wounds ( life or death matter, not offiical)
Small selction of bandages/triangular bandage
Adhesive dressings/plasters
LIGHTLOAD towels, really tightly compressed ( fat 50p ) towels that can be used for soaking stuff up/bandages.
Russel Chest Seal
Trauma Shears
Marker Pen
Roll of Gorilla Tape ( small )
Good bundle of XL Surgical gloves
2 x disposable facemask.

What3Words App on phone.
Spare phone charger packs

Window breaky thing

Due to ferrying my elderly, frail mum around in the car sometimes,I have quite a lot of stuff in the boot in case she is taken poorly/mechanical failure/accident/weather etc.

2 x Hypothermic Sheets. Polystryrene backed foil blankets...these will warm you up if you have a cold injury....the normal thin metal foil blankets will not.
2 x extinguisher
Spare Incontinence pants ( adult nappies ) for me mum, not me......make very good trauma pads.
Tow cable/breakdown lights ( tiny flashy LEDS )
Torch etc
In fact, loads more bloody stuff.....roll on the apocalypse.

Good Old fashioned 100% Wool Blanket....simply nothing better for warmth, not that I intend to use this on some peasant as its too expensive.
 
It’s definitely OTT, all you need is a brufen and tubigrip and maybe some black nasty to stick bits of people back together again, just like they did with me.

No point me carrying anything, i dont like any cünt, so I wont be helping them anyway.
 
The most useful thing that could have been used at the traffic accidents I`ve seen would be a Stihl saw with a metal cutting disc , a big fire extinguisher and maybe a humane dispatch gun.
 

5645andym

Clanker
For my two pennyworth I will say that the best thing to carry is the knowledge gained from a proper First Aid course, once you have got that you can work out all the other details and without it the best kit in the world is useless.

If you have not done a course then book one, get your missis to book one and get the kids booked on one.
 
Instead of the BFO cardboard centre, you can save space by rolling a couple of metres of gaffer tape onto a bit of wooden dowel, old pen or something like that.

Or your wife’s credit card.

Gives you a handy place to store the black nasty and saves you money.

You can then also use the tape to shut her up if she complains :)
 
I disagree. Someone who has an arterial bleed or stops breathing needs immediate intervention or all the first responders will require is a body bag.
take some risk to save saveable lifes is the FS DORA manta
Sweets are a good idea for diabetic problems.

Can't see on the list a notebook and pencil/pen. Suggest something thick like a 2B for easier scribbling if there's rain or dirt.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Having been a response officer in London and dealt with much stabby silliness, I do have a very good first aid kit in my car and an identical one in the wife's car.

Stored in the passenger Footwell just in case you need it from within the car, or the boot is just gone in a crash

4 x trauma dressings
1 Torniquet
Breath Mask...like the oxygen mask affair.
Tampons....insert type for plugging wounds ( life or death matter, not offiical)
Small selction of bandages/triangular bandage
Adhesive dressings/plasters
LIGHTLOAD towels, really tightly compressed ( fat 50p ) towels that can be used for soaking stuff up/bandages.
Russel Chest Seal
Trauma Shears
Marker Pen
Roll of Gorilla Tape ( small )
Good bundle of XL Surgical gloves
2 x disposable facemask.

What3Words App on phone.
Spare phone charger packs

Window breaky thing

Due to ferrying my elderly, frail mum around in the car sometimes,I have quite a lot of stuff in the boot in case she is taken poorly/mechanical failure/accident/weather etc.

2 x Hypothermic Sheets. Polystryrene backed foil blankets...these will warm you up if you have a cold injury....the normal thin metal foil blankets will not.
2 x extinguisher
Spare Incontinence pants ( adult nappies ) for me mum, not me......make very good trauma pads.
Tow cable/breakdown lights ( tiny flashy LEDS )
Torch etc
In fact, loads more bloody stuff.....roll on the apocalypse.

Good Old fashioned 100% Wool Blanket....simply nothing better for warmth, not that I intend to use this on some peasant as its too expensive.
You see, @shiny_arrse ? You see where the rabbit hole leads?!
 
Very easily done.

Except when fell-running, I always carry far more kit than I need when out in the hills. Often to much piss-taking from mates. The expectation is I won’t need to use it, but another idiot might. The smugness of handing over an extra mid-layer to a gibbering mate on a slow crib goch gravers and the return piss-taking in the pub makes up for it.

I am very out of date on first aid beyond MATT3 but when I did a wilderness course I was told of the Good Samaritan principle, ie you can’t be held liable for helping people in certain situations - eg you can’t make an unconscious non-breathing casualty worse, so anything you do that keeps them alive is fair game. I’d take the same approach with someone in a car accident, leaking petrol near a flame, get them out before they burn to death, even if they end up quadraspazzed, you’ve probably saved their life (if no blue light immediately inbound)

If they are complaining about their neck hurting, I’d maybe offer them a splint to put on themselves but would think twice before doing it myself.

I’d be interested if any first responders have any better knowledge/clarity/advice? @AsterixTG might know a bit more about the legal situation.
@A.N.Other and I have similar current skill sets and he's answered pretty much everything as I would have - cheers Trev.

Just for clarification as it has been mentioned.

For cas handover - ATMIST.

A - Age, name etc... of cas if you can get them or from associates of...
T - Time - either when it happened or when you turned up and started aiding
M - Mechanism of injury, how it happened
I - Injuries
S - Signs - observations, pulse, respiratory rate, BP, AVPU, GCS, etc...
T - Treatment

DRCABCDE

Danger
Response
Catastrophic Bleed
Airway
Breathing
Circulation
Disability
Environment/Exposure

We, Mountain Rescue, and I'm assuming the Paramedics/Techs do to, also have an instinctive other 'C' to add in early doors for Cervical Spinal - usually at the Airway stage.
 
No, that's just Monday morning quarterbacking as our lovely cousins would say.

Plod turned up after 15 minutes, shortly followed by Ambulance (pretty good on a motorway I thought).
Yes 15 minutes is good but didn't it seem much, much longer? As in "forever".

In my time on site, decades ago now TF, I had to deal with a fair few bumps, including 2 bad ones. Being "First on scene" was always an unpleasant experience, especially in the dark. All with no training of course, you just did the best you could. The sounds of sirens in the distance can be the sweetest sound in the world.

I well remember one of the bad ones, where we had a site CCTV system monitoring the motorway. The operator called me on the radio to report a head-on in the contraflow. So a closing speed of 100mph. As bad as you'd expect, two extremely lucky people in one car, particularly the driver who had been flung out and gone under the verge safety barrier, missing the fence posts - just bruises. The driver of the other car had his face pushed in and was dead very quickly, which was a blessing in one way I guess.
 
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Packet of Polos and one of those CPR mouth shield thingies and as much morphine as you can lay your hands on.

OK, the Polos was a joke.
Chatting with a Doctor friend of mine (a Mountain Rescue Paramedic in his spare time) he does not recommend anything to do with Mouth to Mouth resuscitation in the current pandemic climate.
 

Yokel

LE
Chatting with a Doctor friend of mine (a Mountain Rescue Paramedic in his spare time) he does not recommend anything to do with Mouth to Mouth resuscitation in the current pandemic climate.

Unless you really fancy the victim?

Would having one of those hard plastic masks you put over the casualty's mouth and nose and blow into a tube?

Are there any statistics for what sort of treatment is needed by those who receive first aid? I imagine that clearing the airway and stopping bleeding does save lives?
 
Tampons. Plug puncture wounds and use as a compress under a gauze pad and a strip of elastoplast or black nasty for other wounds.

BlesBobbejaan has already mentioned it.
 
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