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First Aid kit for a car

In preparing his car First Aid kit, has Themanwho:

  • Done the right thing - BZ!

    Votes: 32 61.5%
  • Gone a little bit OTT, but the idea is sound (you saddo).

    Votes: 12 23.1%
  • A bit scary, but erm okay... Why don't you join St Johns Ambulance?

    Votes: 2 3.8%
  • Mummy, keep the scary man away from my sore bits!

    Votes: 2 3.8%
  • One step away from a prepper's stash in the woods - get a fcuking life.

    Votes: 4 7.7%

  • Total voters
    52
They're evaluating our kit all the time, they're being looked at as well as rechargeable sequential lights that are small enough to slot in the cones whilst being brighter than the current dormans. We are also getting issued with skidboards to put under the wheels of cars with brakes locked on so we can clear them from the carriageway, as well as booster packs for jumpstarting cars with flat batteries.

Someone once showed me a bag of assorted collars, reins and leads for stray animals. Great idea but you've got to catch them first!
 
They're evaluating our kit all the time, they're being looked at as well as rechargeable sequential lights that are small enough to slot in the cones whilst being brighter than the current dormans. We are also getting issued with skidboards to put under the wheels of cars with brakes locked on so we can clear them from the carriageway, as well as booster packs for jumpstarting cars with flat batteries.
ones we have come in a six pack, bit slimmer than a tuna tin, sit in a slim briefcase style case very bright, could run a disco with the choice of pattern settings,rechargeable
 
That is a good idea - you can often get enough air into a flat tyre to carry on for a few miles, repeat as necessary! Doesn't need to have a digital gauge, traditional kick of the sidewall will be good enough in a crisis.
I only suggested that as I have one and it's very good compared to many pump shaped objects. I agree with your point
 
ones we have come in a six pack, bit slimmer than a tuna tin, sit in a slim briefcase style case very bright, could run a disco with the choice of pattern settings,rechargeable

This kind of thing?


I had a 4 pack of mini one's, notice I said had...............your disco comment is the same reason as they were nicked (and lost/broken) by the offspring.

They are bloody excellent, I especially like the magnet on the back as it means you can whang them onto car bodywork so that oncoming vehicles can see exactly where you are.


.
 

Jammy66

War Hero
I was thinking of all the things that might happen on a day to day car journey, such as:

Breakdown
Accident
Encountering people who have had an accident
Getting stuck by snow or floods
Running out of fuel
Being stopped by the Police
I was thinking the same the other day when I had an issue with a low oil level warning and had to stop at a garage. I remembered then that it's impossible to put oil in the car without a funnel which I didn't have (nor did the garage) but I managed to do it with a cup from their vending machine!

Basic first aid kit (including plasters and antiseptic wipes)
Baby wipes for cleaning hands
Toilet paper (always sods law that the public toilet you stop at when you're desperate won't have any!)
Bottle of water
Basic tool kit (adjustable spanner, flat and philips screwdrivers, pliers)
Couple of spare car fuses
Torch
Blanket
Umbrella
Duct tape
Jump leads
Couple of engery type bars (if you break down and have a long wait for the recovery truck!)
Tyre foam stuff (worth it in case you get a flat somewhere you don't want to be tyring to jack it up and fit a spare or can't get the wheel nuts undone!).
 
I was thinking the same the other day when I had an issue with a low oil level warning and had to stop at a garage. I remembered then that it's impossible to put oil in the car without a funnel which I didn't have (nor did the garage) but I managed to do it with a cup from their vending machine!...

A piece of thin cardboard rolled up makes a good single-use funnel, or the top half of a plastic water bottle.
 
This kind of thing?


I had a 4 pack of mini one's, notice I said had...............your disco comment is the same reason as they were nicked (and lost/broken) by the offspring.

They are bloody excellent, I especially like the magnet on the back as it means you can whang them onto car bodywork so that oncoming vehicles can see exactly where you are.


.
yep they may be newer ours are 15 year old
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
A piece of thin cardboard rolled up makes a good single-use funnel, or the top half of a plastic water bottle.
A human femur works too.
 
yep they may be newer ours are 15 year old
I've got a load of these and they are excellent.
One of my greatest fears was breaking down on a SMART Motorway (or high speed road but esp. Smart M/way)
So anything to try alert dopey drivers. If stopped I open the tailgate, pop a couple on there for extra vis.

This is the first aid kit I have in the boot.
DSC_06262mp.JPG
DSC_06272mp.JPG
 
Last edited:

Bearcub20

Clanker
Most posters have covered everything for first aid. The only extra thing I have is a tiny torch, one of those you’d normally have on a key ring, which is attached to the zip of my bag with a retractable lanyard, like you have for a works ID card. It’s not for use whilst carrying out first aid, its for me to see in my bag and look for the head torch that inevitable wriggles it’s way to the bottom of the bag by the movement of the car.

A hi-viz is a must. I’ve kitted my bag for the killers, ie cardiac arrest & cat haem, as well as stuff for minor Injuries. My next addition is some space blankets for the tee-shirt wearing walking wounded who 10 minutes earlier, had the heating on, and are now on a cold hard shoulder.
 
Most posters have covered everything for first aid. The only extra thing I have is a tiny torch, one of those you’d normally have on a key ring, which is attached to the zip of my bag with a retractable lanyard, like you have for a works ID card. It’s not for use whilst carrying out first aid, its for me to see in my bag and look for the head torch that inevitable wriggles it’s way to the bottom of the bag by the movement of the car.

A hi-viz is a must. I’ve kitted my bag for the killers, ie cardiac arrest & cat haem, as well as stuff for minor Injuries. My next addition is some space blankets for the tee-shirt wearing walking wounded who 10 minutes earlier, had the heating on, and are now on a cold hard shoulder.

Agreed on lighting and hi-vis - personal safety first. I don't think you can have too many torches. I'd been thinking about a routine for changing batteries, Christmas, birthday, car MOT time each year or something like that. I reckon good quality batteries would last 12 months.
 

LepetitCaporal

War Hero
A couple of weeks ago I was travelling down the M40, when a large cloud of dust and smoke appeared about half a mile in front of me. I pulled over, grabbed the first aid kit from the boot and ran up to the accident site involving an artic truck, a transit van and two car, all badly mangled. Thankfully there were no fatalities or life threatening injuries; I helped a couple of people out of vehicles, and started giving first aid to a girl with a minor head injury (cut above the eye, bleeding freely). I opened my first aid kit ( similar to the type below):
View attachment 513605
It had virtually nothing of any use, a small strip of fabric plaster, some wipes and nothing for anything more than a finger cut or knee graze level of injury The only useful content was a survival blanket, which I wrapped around the casualty, whilst I tried to mop the blood away and stick the plaster on the cut. Fortunately a squaddie arrived with a handful of FFDs one of which I quickly applied, just in time for plod and ambulances to turn up.

With thirty years of soldiering and ten years of civvy first aider training under my belt, I had no excuse for being so unequipped for dealing with a serious casualty event. I'd bought the shonky car first aid kit years before, mentally ticked it off my list of things to do and forgotten about it, which considering I keep a well stocked first aid kit in my workshop, another in my house and another smaller kit in my range bag is unforgivable. For the remainder of my journey I thought about this, and decided I needed to get a decent kit for the car which could deal with serious injuries when I got home. A quick google got me sucking my teeth at the price of decent first aid kits, however, that thirty years of soldiering has left me with a fair amount of relevant buckshee kit mouldering in the loft, so I thought a DIY effort might do the job. I bought a cheap canvas haversack (£8 ), some basic stuff, (plasters, sticking tape, scissors - another £10), a couple of saddo badges (£10), and put together a reasonably suitable first aid kit, without going totally OTT or breaking the bank.

Behold the magnificence:

View attachment 513609

(Mug included for scale)

Contents (in waterproof containers):

5 x First Field Dressings
3x gel burns dressings
1 x Tourniquet
3 x tri bandages
4 x bandages
1 x eye dressing
1 x roll fabric tape
Vaseline (In case I'm feeling lucky)
1 x roll micropore tape
3 x pairs surgical gloves
1 x pack sticking plasters
Surgical wipes (hods of them)
Syringe for eye wash
Lip balm
2 x bottles Hand gel
3 x Survival blankets
Marker pen
Strap cutter

(Edit: Scissors!)

I know I've gone OTT, blame the current Covid japery for leaving me with too much time on my hands. BUT:

Remembering this is a first aid kit not a paramedic's go bag, is there anything else I really should have included?

All suggestions welcome (to do with the kit).


Cheers....
Maybe, due to current times, some face masks and anti septic/bacteria gel
Hope this helps
L.P.C.
 

LepetitCaporal

War Hero
Agreed on lighting and hi-vis - personal safety first. I don't think you can have too many torches. I'd been thinking about a routine for changing batteries, Christmas, birthday, car MOT time each year or something like that. I reckon good quality batteries would last 12 months.
Do not forget your phone has a torch
 
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