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First Aid kit for a car

In preparing his car First Aid kit, has Themanwho:

  • Done the right thing - BZ!

    Votes: 32 61.5%
  • Gone a little bit OTT, but the idea is sound (you saddo).

    Votes: 12 23.1%
  • A bit scary, but erm okay... Why don't you join St Johns Ambulance?

    Votes: 2 3.8%
  • Mummy, keep the scary man away from my sore bits!

    Votes: 2 3.8%
  • One step away from a prepper's stash in the woods - get a fcuking life.

    Votes: 4 7.7%

  • Total voters
    52

Yokel

LE
My first car suffered a clutch failure on the way to a job interview. It broke down in a communications blackspot, so calling for help was out. I was wearing a suit, and the breakdown happened on a sharp bend. The car was beyond economic repair.

I could have done with better comms, hi viz, warning triangle, and a grenade to set fire to the disabled car!
 
For car? . Ring digital 12v compressor. Jump leads. Tow rope. Tyre sealant. Small socket tool set. Grip strips. Folding shovel. Torch. More rope. And a big 1st aid kit for people.
 
Stuff I never thought of, but was useful:
a good handful of disposable gloves
sturdier gloves (saves bashing your knuckles up if you go under the bonnet for anything, see next)
spark plug spanner
wet wipes
bog roll/ tissues (for the obvious, but also for a runny nose!)
antihistamine
umbrella
towel (in case you forget your umbrella :) )
mug, plate, KFS. Much pleasanter food stops.
You can never have too many towels! The only really big bleed I've ever been inolved with soaked a large beach towel. A first aid kit would have done nothing. Without the towel I would have been packing clothes into/around the wound. A very lage lady fell down steps onto a broken ceramic tile and opened her thigh to the bone width ways, it looked like a seal in one of those Eskimo documentaries.
 

A.N.Other

War Hero
I was thinking of all the things that might happen on a day to day car journey, such as:
Here is what I recommend, most of which I carry. Some is seasonal (warm clothing in the winter). Most of this fits under the floor panel of my estate car, so no inconvenience or intrusion.

For any eventuality/every day carry
  • Mobile phone
  • Cash
  • UK legal knife
  • Mini torch
  • Pen
  • Lighter
  • TRAINING - first aid, RTC scene management (e.g. First Bike on Scene)
Breakdown
  • RAC/AA/other breakdown cover
  • Small set of basic tools appropriate to your mechanic repair knowledge (no point carrying a multimeter if you don't know what a fuse is :) )
  • 12v tyre pump (also useful for beachballs)
  • Can of temporary tyre repair foam
  • Simple spares like screen wash, wiper blades, fuses and bulbs
  • Jumper cables or jumper battery pack (not reliant on another vehicle)
  • Tow rope (only if you know how to be towed, never let the line go slack!)
  • Warning triangle (do not use on motorways and please put it at least 20m or 30m from the car, or before the blind bend!)
  • Roll of blue paper towel (more rugged and lasts longer than kitchen roll)
  • Bin bag
Accident & Encountering people who have had an accident
  • First aid kit appropriate to your skills and knowledge
  • Hi viz vests
  • Torches
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Pry bar
  • Sturdy gloves
  • Seatbelt cutter
  • Window hammer
  • Safety goggles
  • Notebook & pen
  • Simple flashing warning lights for night-time
Getting stuck by snow or floods
  • Wet weather jackets and trousers (better to stay in the car if you can)
  • Warm gloves and hat
  • Shovel
  • Warm clothing
  • Simple snacks which do not need water and have a long shelf life
  • 5L water in opaque container to prevent algae growth (8 drops of household bleach in 5L water keeps it sterile and potable over time). Refresh and replace regularly
  • If in the winter consider a stove and boil in the bag or freeze dried meals (no need for dishes) and don't forget matches!
  • If in the winter consider a foil backed blanket or SOL Bivi bag rather than a sleeping bag. Cheaper and takes up less space
  • Drinks pack/brew kit & mug
  • Possibly a couple of sturdy plastic bags to go over or in shoes, rather than bulky wellies
Running out of fuel
  • Nothing
    • You could carry a 5L can of fuel, but this can gel over time and is a fire risk
    • You can buy a can at a petrol station
Being stopped by the Police
  • A good, calm attitude
  • Dashcam
I'm sure BossHogg will have more suggestions

Edited to add that this list is based on my experience as a Casualty Care instructor for Mountain Rescue, RTC management training with MR and First Bike On Scene, a few years in my teens buying/selling cars and working in garages, off-road driving and having been in too many RTCs myself! ;)
 
Every so often the Police hi-vis goretex jackets pop up on eb@y for around 30 quid. Good value for money.
I got a brand new ambulance jacket off eBay for my community first responder role, it was from a closing down sale, got it for £19. It is almost identical to this one.
c5e26639031c74510cdc0935bdcbd92a--bomber-jackets-bombers.jpg
 
Here is what I recommend, most of which I carry. Some is seasonal (warm clothing in the winter). Most of this fits under the floor panel of my estate car, so no inconvenience or intrusion.

For any eventuality/every day carry
  • Mobile phone
  • Cash
  • UK legal knife
  • Mini torch
  • Pen
  • Lighter
  • TRAINING - first aid, RTC scene management (e.g. First Bike on Scene)
Breakdown
  • RAC/AA/other breakdown cover
  • Small set of basic tools appropriate to your mechanic repair knowledge (no point carrying a multimeter if you don't know what a fuse is :) )
  • 12v tyre pump (also useful for beachballs)
  • Can of temporary tyre repair foam
  • Simple spares like screen wash, wiper blades, fuses and bulbs
  • Jumper cables or jumper battery pack (not reliant on another vehicle)
  • Tow rope (only if you know how to be towed, never let the line go slack!)
  • Warning triangle (do not use on motorways and please put it at least 20m or 30m from the car, or before the blind bend!)
  • Roll of blue paper towel (more rugged and lasts longer than kitchen roll)
  • Bin bag
Accident & Encountering people who have had an accident
  • First aid kit appropriate to your skills and knowledge
  • Hi viz vests
  • Torches
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Pry bar
  • Sturdy gloves
  • Seatbelt cutter
  • Window hammer
  • Safety goggles
  • Notebook & pen
  • Simple flashing warning lights for night-time
Getting stuck by snow or floods
  • Wet weather jackets and trousers (better to stay in the car if you can)
  • Warm gloves and hat
  • Shovel
  • Warm clothing
  • Simple snacks which do not need water and have a long shelf life
  • 5L water in opaque container to prevent algae growth (8 drops of household bleach in 5L water keeps it sterile and potable over time). Refresh and replace regularly
  • If in the winter consider a stove and boil in the bag or freeze dried meals (no need for dishes) and don't forget matches!
  • If in the winter consider a foil backed blanket or SOL Bivi bag rather than a sleeping bag. Cheaper and takes up less space
  • Drinks pack/brew kit & mug
  • Possibly a couple of sturdy plastic bags to go over or in shoes, rather than bulky wellies
Running out of fuel
  • Nothing
    • You could carry a 5L can of fuel, but this can gel over time and is a fire risk
    • You can buy a can at a petrol station
Being stopped by the Police
  • A good, calm attitude
  • Dashcam
I'm sure BossHogg will have more suggestions

Edited to add that this list is based on my experience as a Casualty Care instructor for Mountain Rescue, RTC management training with MR and First Bike On Scene, a few years in my teens buying/selling cars and working in garages, off-road driving and having been in too many RTCs myself! ;)
I'd need a double axle trailer to load all that in, I only have a Honda Civic! :D we carry about 70% of that in the patrol car, both personal and work issue.
 
I'd need a double axle trailer to load all that in, I only have a Honda Civic! :D we carry about 70% of that in the patrol car, both personal and work issue.

I put my stuff in a plastic storage box, keeps it neat and stops it rolling around in the loadspace.
 
I got a brand new ambulance jacket off eBay for my community first responder role, it was from a closing down sale, got it for £19. It is almost identical to this one.
View attachment 541725

I missed out on the plod one's, I wanted one as a hi-vis wet weather over jacket for motorcycling - nothing walty about it over here as plod don't wear hi-vis as a rule. I am patiently waiting for the next release.
 

A.N.Other

War Hero
I put my stuff in a plastic storage box, keeps it neat and stops it rolling around in the loadspace.
Most of this kit is small. It easily fits in the knooks and crannies. Tow rope wraps around the spare wheel. Hi viz vest goes being the rear light access panel and so on. My fist aid kit is rather large so sits in the boot, as does a 5L water container. Luckily I have an estate with lots of space, so don't notice it.

My boot is a bit bigger than a Civic's and I'm not a CFR!
 
For car? . Ring digital 12v compressor. Jump leads. Tow rope. Tyre sealant. Small socket tool set. Grip strips. Folding shovel. Torch. More rope. And a big 1st aid kit for people.

That is a good idea - you can often get enough air into a flat tyre to carry on for a few miles, repeat as necessary! Doesn't need to have a digital gauge, traditional kick of the sidewall will be good enough in a crisis.
 
....Running out of fuel
  • Nothing
    • You could carry a 5L can of fuel, but this can gel over time and is a fire risk
    • You can buy a can at a petrol station

Most cars will easily do 3-400 miles on a tankful so no excuse for this. Even less excuse if there's likely to be bad weather or heavy traffic.
 
I prefer longer jackets - if I had one of those I'd add a pair of lightweight waterproof trousers, they'd probably fit in one of the pockets.

I will write in hushed tones so as not to attract attention.........go to ebay and put in (here it comes, oh the shame) RAF goretex and you will be presented with goretex trousers with zippy legs for around 20 quid. An absolute bargain for goretex trousers, I was eyeing up some civvy equivalents for motorcycling costing almost 200 quid.
 

Yokel

LE
Out of interest, what sort of emergency equipment and tools do the Police and people like @BossHogg have in their cars? What emergency kit do Challenger and Warrior (and other military vehicle) crews carry?

@supermatelot might remember what emergency kit is carried by a RIB being used as a seaboat.
 
Last edited:

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Although this is an old car, we still carry the same kit with the addition of a defibrillator.
5511897132_46fd47de53_c-jpg.541841
That's an awful lot of buttplugs.
 
Although this is an old car, we still carry the same kit with the addition of a defibrillator.
View attachment 541841
I'm surprised you lot don't use these things


Take up far less boot space and a bigger physical presence when installed. Pricy though in comparison to the bog-standard 450s you do carry.
 
I'm surprised you lot don't use these things


Take up far less boot space and a bigger physical presence when installed. Pricy though in comparison to the bog-standard 450s you do carry.
They're evaluating our kit all the time, they're being looked at as well as rechargeable sequential lights that are small enough to slot in the cones whilst being brighter than the current dormans. We are also getting issued with skidboards to put under the wheels of cars with brakes locked on so we can clear them from the carriageway, as well as booster packs for jumpstarting cars with flat batteries.
 
There's only 20, but enough to close a motorway and spoil the day for thousands. ;)
Dusty in here.
You should carry a "Sorry for any delay" sign as well.
I'm sure it would be well received :twisted:
 

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