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First Aid kit for a car

In preparing his car First Aid kit, has Themanwho:

  • Done the right thing - BZ!

    Votes: 24 60.0%
  • Gone a little bit OTT, but the idea is sound (you saddo).

    Votes: 8 20.0%
  • A bit scary, but erm okay... Why don't you join St Johns Ambulance?

    Votes: 2 5.0%
  • Mummy, keep the scary man away from my sore bits!

    Votes: 2 5.0%
  • One step away from a prepper's stash in the woods - get a fcuking life.

    Votes: 4 10.0%

  • Total voters
    40

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
A couple of weeks ago I was travelling down the M40, when a large cloud of dust and smoke appeared about half a mile in front of me. I pulled over, grabbed the first aid kit from the boot and ran up to the accident site involving an artic truck, a transit van and two car, all badly mangled. Thankfully there were no fatalities or life threatening injuries; I helped a couple of people out of vehicles, and started giving first aid to a girl with a minor head injury (cut above the eye, bleeding freely). I opened my first aid kit ( similar to the type below):
1603194486125.png

It had virtually nothing of any use, a small strip of fabric plaster, some wipes and nothing for anything more than a finger cut or knee graze level of injury The only useful content was a survival blanket, which I wrapped around the casualty, whilst I tried to mop the blood away and stick the plaster on the cut. Fortunately a squaddie arrived with a handful of FFDs one of which I quickly applied, just in time for plod and ambulances to turn up.

With thirty years of soldiering and ten years of civvy first aider training under my belt, I had no excuse for being so unequipped for dealing with a serious casualty event. I'd bought the shonky car first aid kit years before, mentally ticked it off my list of things to do and forgotten about it, which considering I keep a well stocked first aid kit in my workshop, another in my house and another smaller kit in my range bag is unforgivable. For the remainder of my journey I thought about this, and decided I needed to get a decent kit for the car which could deal with serious injuries when I got home. A quick google got me sucking my teeth at the price of decent first aid kits, however, that thirty years of soldiering has left me with a fair amount of relevant buckshee kit mouldering in the loft, so I thought a DIY effort might do the job. I bought a cheap canvas haversack (£8 ), some basic stuff, (plasters, sticking tape, scissors - another £10), a couple of saddo badges (£10), and put together a reasonably suitable first aid kit, without going totally OTT or breaking the bank.

Behold the magnificence:

1603196212381.png


(Mug included for scale)

Contents (in waterproof containers):

5 x First Field Dressings
3x gel burns dressings
1 x Tourniquet
3 x tri bandages
4 x bandages
1 x eye dressing
1 x roll fabric tape
Vaseline (In case I'm feeling lucky)
1 x roll micropore tape
3 x pairs surgical gloves
1 x pack sticking plasters
Surgical wipes (hods of them)
Syringe for eye wash
Lip balm
2 x bottles Hand gel
3 x Survival blankets
Marker pen
Strap cutter

(Edit: Scissors!)

I know I've gone OTT, blame the current Covid japery for leaving me with too much time on my hands. BUT:

Remembering this is a first aid kit not a paramedic's go bag, is there anything else I really should have included?

All suggestions welcome (to do with the kit).

Cheers....
 
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A couple of weeks ago I was travelling down the M40, when a large cloud of dust and smoke appeared about half a mile in front of me. I pulled over, grabbed the first aid kit from the boot and ran up to the accident site involving an artic truck, a transit van and two car, all badly mangled. Thankfully there were no fatalities or life threatening injuries; I helped a couple of people out of vehicles, and started giving first aid to a girl with a minor head injury (cut above the eye, bleeding freely). I opened my first aid kit ( similar to the type below):
View attachment 513605
It had virtually nothing of any use, a small strip of fabric plaster, some wipes and nothing for anything more than a finger cut or knee graze level of injury The only useful content was a survival blanket, which I wrapped around the casualty, whilst I tried to mop the blood away and stick the plaster on the cut. Fortunately a squaddie arrived with a handful of FFDs one of which I quickly applied, just in time for plod and ambulances to turn up.

With thirty years of soldiering and ten years of civvy first aider training under my belt, I had no excuse for being so unequipped for dealing with a serious casualty event. I'd bought the shonky car first aid kit years before, mentally ticked it off my list of things to do and forgotten about it, which considering I keep a well stocked first aid kit in my workshop, another in my house and another smaller kit in my range bag is unforgivable. For the remainder of my journey I thought about this, and decided I needed to get a decent kit for the car which could deal with serious injuries when I got home. A quick google got me sucking my teeth at the price of decent first aid kits, however, that thirty years of soldiering has left me with a fair amount of relevant buckshee kit mouldering in the loft, so I thought a DIY effort might do the job. I bought a cheap canvas haversack (£8), some basic stuff, (plasters, sticking tape, scissors another £10), a couple of saddo badges (£10), and put together a reasonably suitable first aid kit, without going totally OTT or breaking the bank.

Behold the magnificence:

View attachment 513609

(Mug included for scale)

Contents (in waterproof containers):

5 x First Field Dressings
3x gel burns dressings
1 x Tourniquet
3 x tri bandages
4 x bandages
1 x eye dressing
1 x roll fabric tape
Vaseline (In case I'm feeling lucky)
1 x roll micropore tape
3 x pairs surgical gloves
1 x pack sticking plasters
Surgical wipes (hods of them)
Syringe for eye wash
Lip balm
2 x bottles Hand gel
3 x Survival blankets
Marker pen
Strap cutter

I know I've gone OTT, blame the current Covid japery for leaving me with too much time on my hands. BUT:

Remembering this is a first aid kit not a paramedic's go bag, is there anything else I really should have included?

All suggestions welcome (to do with the kit).

Cheers....
@Themanwho,

You git, I have one of those (Halfords) first aid kits.
Your post has got me thinking about putting a decent kit together for myself.
 
Packet of Polos and one of those CPR mouth shield thingies and as much morphine as you can lay your hands on.

OK, the Polos was a joke.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I knew my 37 pattern small pack would come in useful one day. Just need a car now.
I recommend an Austin Champ, so it's in keeping.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
A pair of surgical shears. Small sterile towel in a sealed bag. Water. Other than that, I like it. Only 2 types of first aid incidents 1. They need a plaster which is what most commercial kits cater for, or 2. They need immediate life saving aid and hospital.
 
Depends how far you want to take it but consider

CPR face shields

Sandwich bags with handles (put valuables in and attach to person.)

Toe tags (laminated card with string through it to write up what you’ve done so can give a HOTO to paramedics)

Headtorch & cyalumes.

Maybe consider some Sam splints and cling film to put on burns to keep clean.

Plus I assume in your car you have 2x hi-vis vests, a fire extinguisher and a decent warning triangle.

all absolute overkill until you need it. which you might on a country road with little phone signal. Have had someone keel over behind me and having to give mouth to mouth, I was glad I had a face shield in my wallet. A mate had to look after someone for 20 minutes as he and his doctor wife were first on the scene. He said it was annoying how little they could do to help despite their knowledge as they had no kit.

obviously doing too much when not qualified is not a good idea.
 
Under no circumstances place a casualty in your own car even if pissing down, if they then complain of neck/back pain the chances are your going to lose your roof
it happens trust me
 
Seems like a sensible first aid kit if you ask me. Our one is similar but without the gel dressings for burns and eye wash.

I will have to add them to the shopping basket next time I am in Boots.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
I had Shears, disposal bag, biro & notebook, sweeties, paper towels/tissues, wet wipes, antihistamine, aspirin.
The first 2 are genuine First Aid, the others comfort items.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Depends how far you want to take it but consider

CPR face shields

Sandwich bags with handles (put valuables in and attach to person.)

Toe tags (laminated card with string through it to write up what you’ve done so can give a HOTO to paramedics)

Headtorch & cyalumes.

Maybe consider some Sam splints

Plus I assume in your car you have 2x hi-vis vests, a fire extinguisher and a decent warning triangle.

all absolute overkill until you need it. which you might on a country road with little phone signal. Have had someone keel over behind me and having to give mouth to mouth, I was glad I had a face shield in my wallet. A mate had to look after someone for 20 minutes as he and his doctor wife were first on the scene. He said it was annoying how little they could do to help despite their knowledge as they had no kit.
CPR face shields is a good call: Hi viz, torch and cyalumes are already in the car boot kit (of which the shonky first aid kit was part), along with an entrenching tool and the world's supply of bleeding shopping bags. I've always got a knife, torch, notebook and pen on me, because I am exactly that sad.

Your last paragraph is what got to me; I'm usually pretty well prepared for anything especially when travelling, and it gave me a shock to find I had left myself so vulnerable to events.
 
After years in the army, further education, transport and logistics, security, and vehicle recovery, all you need is a phone and an accurate knowledge of where you are. Then leave it to professionals who are, allegedly, trained and equipped to do the job.

In your example you've abandoned your car, on a motorway, to help somebody else. Admirable, but causes as many problems as it solves.
First rule of first aid, don't become a casualty yourself.
 

A.N.Other

Old-Salt
Be careful re drugs! Don't give them out unless your first aid training has included drugs, dosage, contra indications, etc.

For example, you give asprin to someone with mild pain. They haven't told you they're alsread on blood thinners and have had a bad belly for a few days. Now they're shitting blood from a stomach ulcer gone bad.
 

giatttt

Old-Salt
Steristrips deal with most soft tissue splits between a bandaid scratch and a full on mess.

Vulcan zinc oxide tape holds the triangular bandage you are using to stem the blood in place. Micropore is not very strong and doesn't like getting wet, it may seem overkill, but the proper paramedics can cut it off and you don't have to worry about it falling off. It's a bit like black nasty for medics, RTAs often happen in the rain for some reason.
 

arfah

LE
Brufen x2
sympathy - post gapped (FFBNW)

Edit: Just been out to check mine, manufacturers own and ten years out of date. Still sealed though.
 
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