Fire Shirkers Management Bollox

#2
An extraordinarily story I personally found difficult to believe until I saw a photograph of the sign the management had erected upon the door of the room within which the chair is located, to the effect that the chair was not to be sat upon by individuals until they had received formal instruction on it's use!

That a sleeping bag is found within a locker is no more conclusive to the fact that it's owner is sleeping upon a floor than it would be that a man is smoking in a no-smoking area simply because he is found to be rolling a cigarette in the same place! Formal disciplinary action on that basis is at best tenuous and at worst irrational.

The deployment of a prohibitory notice, the basis upon which disciplinary action was taken and the method under which their policy was introduced points to a dysfunctional and terminally ill managment structure.
 
#3
This of course has nothing to do with Health and Safety and all to do with the production of CYA paperwork for Management. The HSAWA 1974 is fine piece of legislation drafted for all the right reasons.

However it has been well and truly hijacked by the legal profesion and the subsequent growth of the Health and Safety profession is astonishing.

The net result of this sort of nonsense is that even more people now think H&S is all about stupid rules and even more stupid managers.
 
#4
rickshaw-major said:
This of course has nothing to do with Health and Safety and all to do with the production of CYA paperwork for Management. The HSAWA 1974 is fine piece of legislation drafted for all the right reasons.

However it has been well and truly hijacked by the legal profesion and the subsequent growth of the Health and Safety profession is astonishing.

The net result of this sort of nonsense is that even more people now think H&S is all about stupid rules and even more stupid managers.
Absolutely - Health and Safety is there for a reason, to keep people safe as is reasonably practical at work. The underlined bit is what people forget.
 
#5
The fact that they employed an "ergonomics consultant" at all is astonishing.
If you took their overnight duties and rapid reaction call out times into account, it would not be a far leap to make that MOD guard rooms manned by soldiers were in need of the same makeover..... Can you imagine taking away the beds from our soldiers on overnight guard and giving them these chairs saying "sleep is not allowed".....
 
#6
And dont forget, all that comes under the mantle of..... Modernisation!

What a load of cock!
 
#7
jimbojetset said:
rickshaw-major said:
This of course has nothing to do with Health and Safety and all to do with the production of CYA paperwork for Management. The HSAWA 1974 is fine piece of legislation drafted for all the right reasons.

However it has been well and truly hijacked by the legal profesion and the subsequent growth of the Health and Safety profession is astonishing.

The net result of this sort of nonsense is that even more people now think H&S is all about stupid rules and even more stupid managers.
Absolutely - Health and Safety is there for a reason, to keep people safe as is reasonably practical at work. The underlined bit is what people forget.
Jimbo - it won't be long before the reasonable bit is removed. If it can be done, whatever the cost, then it will have to be done.
 
#8
rickshaw-major said:
jimbojetset said:
rickshaw-major said:
This of course has nothing to do with Health and Safety and all to do with the production of CYA paperwork for Management. The HSAWA 1974 is fine piece of legislation drafted for all the right reasons.

However it has been well and truly hijacked by the legal profesion and the subsequent growth of the Health and Safety profession is astonishing.

The net result of this sort of nonsense is that even more people now think H&S is all about stupid rules and even more stupid managers.
Absolutely - Health and Safety is there for a reason, to keep people safe as is reasonably practical at work. The underlined bit is what people forget.
Jimbo - it won't be long before the reasonable bit is removed. If it can be done, whatever the cost, then it will have to be done.

Reasonably practicle is to stay see https://www.gnn.gov.uk/Content/Detail.asp?ReleaseID=291742&NewsAreaID=2
 
#9
ERGONOMICS...
The term “ergonomics” is derived from two Greek words: “ergon”, meaning work and “nomoi”, meaning natural laws. Ergonomists study human capabilities in relationship to work demands.

POSTURE...
In recent years, ergonomists have attempted to define postures which minimize unnecessary static work and reduce the forces acting on the body. All of us could significantly reduce our risk of injury if we could adhere to the following ergonomic principles:

All work activities should permit the worker to adopt several different, but equally healthy and safe postures
Where muscular force has to be exerted it should be done by the largest appropriate muscle groups available.
Work activities should be performed with the joints at about mid-point of their range of movement. This applies particularly to the head, trunk, and upper limbs.

THE PROBLEM...
Here, however, we arrive at a serious problem - and a challenge to conventional ergonomic thinking: In order to put these recommendations into practice, a person would have to be a skilled observer of his or her own joint and muscle functioning and would have to be able to change his or her posture to a healthier one at will. No one develops this sort of highly refined sensory awareness without special training. Therefore, in order to derive the benefits of ergonomic research, we must learn how to observe our bodies in a new way.* Any attempt to improve workplace conditions can have only limited success if this issue is ignored.

They are only acting on the welfare of the firemen folks and their Health and Safety comes first.How many firemen have quit the job because of health reasons related to their posture?
 
#10
TartanJock said:
ERGONOMICS...
The term “ergonomics” is derived from two Greek words: “ergon”, meaning work and “nomoi”, meaning natural laws. Ergonomists study human capabilities in relationship to work demands.

POSTURE...
In recent years, ergonomists have attempted to define postures which minimize unnecessary static work and reduce the forces acting on the body. All of us could significantly reduce our risk of injury if we could adhere to the following ergonomic principles:

All work activities should permit the worker to adopt several different, but equally healthy and safe postures
Where muscular force has to be exerted it should be done by the largest appropriate muscle groups available.
Work activities should be performed with the joints at about mid-point of their range of movement. This applies particularly to the head, trunk, and upper limbs.

THE PROBLEM...
Here, however, we arrive at a serious problem - and a challenge to conventional ergonomic thinking: In order to put these recommendations into practice, a person would have to be a skilled observer of his or her own joint and muscle functioning and would have to be able to change his or her posture to a healthier one at will. No one develops this sort of highly refined sensory awareness without special training. Therefore, in order to derive the benefits of ergonomic research, we must learn how to observe our bodies in a new way.* Any attempt to improve workplace conditions can have only limited success if this issue is ignored.

They are only acting on the welfare of the firemen folks and their Health and Safety comes first.How many firemen have quit the job because of health reasons related to their posture?
You've appear to have missed your vocation - get into entertainment pronto.

PAW
 
#11
Best thing all round would be to skip the chairs, and reinstate the firemens bunks, then everyone, the HSE, the firemen etc would be happy, have you ever tried to get some decent kip in one of those types of chairs? its near imposible, and does not begin to compare to a nice cosy bunk. :D
 
#12
"We are required to provide rest facilities for the night shift and took independent advice from ergonomists as to what facilities would be appropriate. These were identified and introduced," he said.
More importantly why should they be sleeping if they are on duty. A night shift in any other job will sleep in the day and WORK at night. Rest facilities should be no more than a day shift would expect!
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#13
Horridlittleman said:
"We are required to provide rest facilities for the night shift and took independent advice from ergonomists as to what facilities would be appropriate. These were identified and introduced," he said.
More importantly why should they be sleeping if they are on duty. A night shift in any other job will sleep in the day and WORK at night. Rest facilities should be no more than a day shift would expect!
Bollox.

If they had to sleep during the day, how would they fit in their second job. They have to sleep at night to stay alert for mini-cabbing...
 
#14
Horridlittleman said:
"We are required to provide rest facilities for the night shift and took independent advice from ergonomists as to what facilities would be appropriate. These were identified and introduced," he said.
More importantly why should they be sleeping if they are on duty. A night shift in any other job will sleep in the day and WORK at night. Rest facilities should be no more than a day shift would expect!
Boloxs, working a rotating night day shift is a whole different ball game, you no doubt have never worked one in your life , humans were never meant to be nocturnal, our cardian cycles never adjust to it fully, fact, which is why you normally feel a tad different at 0300 than you do at 1500, therefore if you can by the nature of the job get some sleep whilst on nightshift it makes very good sense, i work a rotating 4 day shift 2 days 2 nights and the way we work it is, if possible get stuck in, get all the work boxed by say 0200 and then get some kip before we need to start again at around 0500, getting a couple of hours shut eye makes all the diference i can assure you
 
#15
Cardian cycles?

Is that a dress code or a means of transport?
 
#16
The watch manager was found guilty of not seeing something the others said never happened anyway

Only under New Liarbour
 
#17
Lucky_Jim said:
Cardian cycles?

Is that a dress code or a means of transport?
sorry jim, i shouldnt have used such a complex term, basically it that little clock in your body that tells you it time for beddy byes, therefore by the time 0300 rolls around luck jims body clock is saying come on jim up the wooden hill, (even if lucky jim had in fact spent the day tucked up in his pit) its a funy old thing but thats the way the good lord made us, hoped thats makes it a bit clearer jim
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
auxie said:
Horridlittleman said:
"We are required to provide rest facilities for the night shift and took independent advice from ergonomists as to what facilities would be appropriate. These were identified and introduced," he said.
More importantly why should they be sleeping if they are on duty. A night shift in any other job will sleep in the day and WORK at night. Rest facilities should be no more than a day shift would expect!
Boloxs, working a rotating night day shift is a whole different ball game, you no doubt have never worked one in your life , humans were never meant to be nocturnal, our cardian cycles never adjust to it fully, fact, which is why you normally feel a tad different at 0300 than you do at 1500, therefore if you can by the nature of the job get some sleep whilst on nightshift it makes very good sense, i work a rotating 4 day shift 2 days 2 nights and the way we work it is, if possible get stuck in, get all the work boxed by say 0200 and then get some kip before we need to start again at around 0500, getting a couple of hours shut eye makes all the diference i can assure you
I thought you were a 90k 'fellow of ImechE' with a masters degree in engineering. Why would such a high-faluting engineering genius be working such strange shift patterns. I thought it was all 9 to 5 in your civvy world!

As for nocturnal rythms - you are completely and utterly wrong. Humans adapt quite quickly to nocturnal cycles. Ever heard of jetlag? This is due to switching time-zones. If humans were unable to switch their body clocks from one cycle to the next, Australians would sleep in the day time.
 
#19
auxie said:
Lucky_Jim said:
Cardian cycles?

Is that a dress code or a means of transport?
sorry jim, i shouldnt have used such a complex term, basically it that little clock in your body that tells you it time for beddy byes, therefore by the time 0300 rolls around luck jims body clock is saying come on jim up the wooden hill, (even if lucky jim had in fact spent the day tucked up in his pit) its a funy old thing but thats the way the good lord made us, hoped thats makes it a bit clearer jim


Do you mean Circadian cycle you sarcastic tw@t?

edited to add: I do not mean you jim! - it is directed at this illiterate rotarian fcukwit with his head stuck up his ARRSE!
 
#20
Strange civvie world you must live in bipod, shift work is a fact of life, consider, next time you fly off to malaga and you get on that nice aeroplane at 0800 that hopefully will fly you safely there consider who maintains said machine? and when does it happen? stangely enough mostly at night , therefore most line enginers such as i have to work shifts, obvious if you think about it , however the up side is they pay me very well for the awesome responsibilty of making sure that that nice airbus worth sixty million quid and those two hundred and seventy souls dont end up in a smoking hole somewhere,responsibility does have its rewards bipod, which is as im sure you would agree quite right and proper
 

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