Fire Saftey Laws On SLA

Discussion in 'Finance, Property, Law' started by fubar_forces, Jun 28, 2009.

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  1. We are being moved from SLAM Accomodation, into old style German SLA, which only has one set of stairs from the top floor which surely is not in keeping with fire saftey law.

    Can anyone possibly shed some light on this please?
     
  2. get a ground floor room
     
  3. My civvie flat had the same,
     
  4. How many floors are we talking? Fire safety is done on a risk assessment basis looking at fire protection/compartmentalisation/detection etc Should be a low risk building I'd imagine? No hot works taking place, no smoking. If it's an old building the cost of adding an extra staircase or exit could probably be considered more than the risk. Check that you've got decent smoke/heat detection if you're worried as this will make the difference in a building where occupants will be sleeping. How far is it to your exit route? It should be 18metres till you are in a safe place e.g. a proctected stairwell.
     
  5. Its a two floor building, and there are smoke but not heat detectors.
    There is a kitchen area on the bottom floor, but we're unsure on whether it is operational.
    There is also a wash room for dryers and washing machines.

    Thanks for your input on this.
     
  6. No probs. There should be detectors in the kitchen and laundry room. Does it actually have a cooker? Or just a microwave etc? If there is a proper cooker there should be a fire blanket and CO2 extinguishers near the laundry room. Whoever manages the building should be enforcing good procedures also - switching off irons, housekeeping etc

    It is legal to have a dead end i.e. an area with only one exit. But the building must have a fire assessment and this should be covered. There must be 30 mins fire protection, good levels of detectors and sufficient fire fighting equipment. I'll correct myself above also - the escape time from a bedroom is 9m - to a place of safety e.g. a protected corridor.

    The link below has eveything you need to know, although to be fair it's only dull safety people who can stand to read it :D But if you're really worried/interested it might help? If you do have a look, p.67 onwards is very applicable to you.
    http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/fire/pdf/151339.pdf
     
  7. Thanks for taking the time to answer us, not the answer i wanted but it is the answer i needed.

    thanks.