Film to be made about first black army officer

#21
still an inspring story considering we have abolished slavery in 1807 and enforced throught the Empire 30+ years before the US Government got round to doing so and it was only to destroy the CSA economy,rather than out of altruism, fast forward up to the 1950s they had racial segregation and separate Negro units in the US army with apartied carried across they also tried to enforce US Army segregation in the UK, we told them politely where to stuff it.

Having an Empire of Multi ethnic army had something to do with that, admitedly its wasn't all roses and light with reagrd to attitudes on the ground but by and large it was way better than the US and wasn't enshrined in Law.

Things have improved a LOT in the USA with the election of Obama, Confederate President Jefferson Davies would be spinning in his grave now.
 
#22
semper said:
still an inspring story considering we have abolished slavery in 1807 and enforced throught the Empire 30+ years before the US Government got round to doing so and it was only to destroy the CSA economy,rather than out of altruism, fast forward up to the 1950s they had racial segregation and separate Negro units in the US army with apartied carried across they also tried to enforce US Army segregation in the UK, we told them politely where to stuff it.

Having an Empire of Multi ethnic army had something to do with that, admitedly its wasn't all roses and light with reagrd to attitudes on the ground but by and large it was way better than the US and wasn't enshrined in Law.

Things have improved a LOT in the USA with the election of Obama, Confederate President Jefferson Davies would be spinning in his grave now.
*Jefferson Davis*
 
#23
BoomShackerLacker said:
Walter's War

Kwei-Armah is an exceptional observer. What the licence fee is for!
Just watched that. My verdict is that it was a rather enjoyable programme but could have been much better. Too shallow and inaccurate. It pretty much made out that his race was a permanent drawback on his football career and booing him was universal. That bit was cr@p.

If it was made primarily for entertainment then very good. If it was supposed to be more on the documentary/factual side then poor show. To be fair it was a lot to tackle in a 60 min production.
 
#24
Perturbed said:
BoomShackerLacker said:
Walter's War

Kwei-Armah is an exceptional observer. What the licence fee is for!
Just watched that. My verdict is that it was a rather enjoyable programme but could have been much better. Too shallow and inaccurate. It pretty much made out that his race was a permanent drawback on his football career and booing him was universal. That bit was cr@p.

If it was made primarily for entertainment then very good. If it was supposed to be more on the documentary/factual side then poor show. To be fair it was a lot to tackle in a 60 min production.
His race was indeed a permanent drawback full stop... in a country (pre-Immigration Act) that was rich with racial ignorance and accepting of "no blacks, no irish, no dogs"... credit to Armah for pulling no punches. Yes, it was reductionist and devoid of complexity but authentic for exposing the 'lived felt experience' of the individual.
 
#25
BoomShackerLacker said:
Perturbed said:
Just watched that. My verdict is that it was a rather enjoyable programme but could have been much better. Too shallow and inaccurate. It pretty much made out that his race was a permanent drawback on his football career and booing him was universal. That bit was cr@p.

If it was made primarily for entertainment then very good. If it was supposed to be more on the documentary/factual side then poor show. To be fair it was a lot to tackle in a 60 min production.
His race was indeed a permanent drawback full stop... in a country (pre-Immigration Act) that was rich with racial ignorance and accepting of "no blacks, no irish, no dogs"... credit to Armah for pulling no punches. Yes, it was reductionist and devoid of complexity but authentic for exposing the 'lived felt experience' of the individual.
I am sure his race was a drawback. I didn't say it was not, just that the programme exaggerated it WRT his football appearances. I do agree that racial ignorance was rife pre-immigration but believe racial tensions where less.


Tull scored four in one match while playing as an inside forward for Northampton Town. However, he played most of his 110 games for Northampton as a wing-half. Tull became the club's most popular player. Tull did not always get a good response from the fans of the opposition. The Northampton Echo reported on 9th October 1909: "A section of the spectators made a cowardly attack upon him in language lower than Billingsgate... Let me tell these Bristol hooligans (there were but few of them in a crowd of nearly twenty thousand) that Tull is so clean in mind and method as to be a model for all white men who play football whether they be amateur or professional. In point of ability, if not in actual achievement, Tull was the best forward on the field.''

Tull's ... display on Saturday must have astounded everyone who saw it. Such perfect coolness, such judicious waiting for a fraction of a second in order to get a pass in not before a defender has worked to a false position, and such accuracy of strength in passing I have not seen for a long time."

Other clubs wanted to sign Walter Tull and in 1914 Glasgow Rangers began negotiations with Northampton Town. However, before he could play for them the First World War was declared. Tull immediately abandoned his career and offered his services to the British Army. Walter, like many professional players, joined the Football Battalion. At the time it was commanded by Major Frank Buckley. The Army soon recognised Tull's leadership qualities and he was quickly promoted to the rank of sergeant.
From here:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWtull.htm

Interesting reading about a fascinating man. I do believe that Cyril Regis got far worse treatment from opposing fans than Capt. Tull.
 

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