Film: 'Greyhound', starring Tom Hanks - 1942 - A Convoy Edges Across The Atlantic - Release Date July 2020

I thought (though my wife considers my thinking a double edged sword at best) that the USN escorted a certain distance before handing over to the RN who then took the convoy the final 2/3 of the way. Is that correct or did it just come later or..?
I think that came before the US joined the war* with the U boats by and large concentrated in the East Atlantic so the RN fought across that then handed over to US ships.

Which makes sense - there was a reluctance to risk sinking a US neutral ship) and thus give casus belli. Thus the 2nd safer half of the journey was rendered safer and the RN didn't have to fight the whole way across plus logistic considerations.
Im hazy but can warships rearm in a neutral port - I know theres limits to what they can do and duration.

With US entry into the war the above changes - no safety in a US flag and no port restrictions - It makes more sense to go the whole way.

As for air cover - that was simply aircraft range related.

* Disputes about joined and joined in practice aside
 

Blogg

LE
As stated chunks filmed aboard USS Kidd

Not much else to do right now? Off you go:

 
Americans have a law against stolen valour but that doesn't stop hollywood blatantly stealing the glory that should rightly belong to the RN and RCN.

The success of the Atlantic theatre was largely a British one, the Pacific was for the Americans. Incidentally, something like 90% of the ships on D-Day were British too.

It's difficult not to take this personally when your family were involved in convoy escorts, I wonder how the USN would react if Pinewood Studios released an international blockbuster about the British Pacific Fleet saving the world from Imperial Japan?
 

QRK2

LE
I think that came before the US joined the war* with the U boats by and large concentrated in the East Atlantic so the RN fought across that then handed over to US ships.

Which makes sense - there was a reluctance to risk sinking a US neutral ship) and thus give casus belli. Thus the 2nd safer half of the journey was rendered safer and the RN didn't have to fight the whole way across plus logistic considerations.
Im hazy but can warships rearm in a neutral port - I know theres limits to what they can do and duration.

With US entry into the war the above changes - no safety in a US flag and no port restrictions - It makes more sense to go the whole way.

As for air cover - that was simply aircraft range related.

* Disputes about joined and joined in practice aside
The story of USN involvement before 7 Dec 41 is really quite interesting and nuanced. Just as a taster:

 
Thanks, so in 1942 the USN did go with their convoys all the way to England?
Am going to say yes, for replenishment reasons
Some American point of view links below



 
Am going to say yes, for replenishment reasons
Some American point of view links below



For most of the war, escort groups turned back part of the way across. Starting when the US declared a "security zone", they began taking over at a given line of longitude. IIRC they were also refuelling escorts at sea on the quiet. This arrangement pretty much fell apart when the US actually entered the war and responsibility passed from the Coasties to the USN. Then there was a massive row between the RN and RCN, followed by another between the RN and RCN on one hand and the USN on the other, which finished with a sane command structure and the US adopting convoys.
 

QRK2

LE
This arrangement pretty much fell apart when the US actually entered the war and responsibility passed from the Coasties to the USN. Then there was a massive row between the RN and RCN, followed by another between the RN and RCN on one hand and the USN on the other, which finished with a sane command structure and the US adopting convoys.
Pretty much takes the prize for understatement, Adm King was very much opposed to 'Germany First' and made a huge contribution to Germany's war effort by:
  • refusing to implement convoys on the US East Coast;
  • refusing to allow USAAF air to contribute over the Atlantic;
  • not having a blackout on the eastern seaboard (U Boats could clearly pick out targets silhouetted against the lights);
  • refusing to consider the requisition of civil vessels to as auxiliary convoy escorts;
  • and a couple of other items.
See the book referenced above.
 
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load_fin

War Hero
Interesting paper here, showing the cause of all Uboat losses.

After 1942, the vast majority were sunk by aircraft, from RN, USN, RAF, USAAF, RCAF, RAAF, both shore based and carrier based.

Also interesting to see how often HMS Starling is mentioned.

ETA 16 times...
Starling was Capt F J Walker's ship, although I'm not certain of the dates he was in command. The 2nd support group, which he commanded for most of it's time, is credited with 20 sinkings.

 
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Interesting paper here, showing the cause of all Uboat losses.

After 1942, the vast majority were sunk by aircraft, from RN, USN, RAF, USAAF, RCAF, RAAF, both shore based and carrier based.

Also interesting to see how often HMS Starling is mentioned.

The American historians can be fairly good at recognising the RN + RCN taking the lions share of the task from the start.
 

syrup

LE
On the Radio tonight they said that COVID had done for this films cinema release
Apple have bought the distribution rights and will show it on their channel
 

soleil

War Hero
On the Radio tonight they said that COVID had done for this films cinema release
Apple have bought the distribution rights and will show it on their channel
That's right, it premieres on July 10th.

 
Nothing Hanks will do can beat the utter bolloux of being stranded on a desert island for ten years living off coconuts, then when he's rescued and back in the US a week later he hasn't even got a sun tan.
 
Interesting paper here, showing the cause of all Uboat losses.

After 1942, the vast majority were sunk by aircraft, from RN, USN, RAF, USAAF, RCAF, RAAF, both shore based and carrier based.

Also interesting to see how often HMS Starling is mentioned.

ETA 16 times...
Starling was Capt F J Walker's ship, although I'm not certain of the dates he was in command. The 2nd support group, which he commanded for most of it's time, is credited with 20 sinkings.

Walker took command of HMS Starling on her commissioning on 22 March 1943. He remained her commanding officer until his death on 9 July 1944.
 
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soleil

War Hero
Thats a pity, it had a big screen feel about it.
I would agree.

I wonder whether the contract has been written in such a way as to allow the film to premiere on Apple and then be shown exclusively there until normal cinema release is possible, September, perhaps.
 

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