Fighting Light.. what is the problem?

Pretty sure that when 10th Mountain deployed in a Mountain role, US MIL COC was met with “but we don’t do mountains”. But off they won’t anyway.
No - everyone in the COC knows the capabilities of a light infantry division. The US Army doesn’t have an active duty specialized mountain unit but it does have a National Guard mountain brigade, as well as a mountain warfare school which trains infantry leaders in mountain warfare tactics. These “Military Mountaineers” are the SME in the line units and provide guidance on training and tactics. Additionally, the Mountain Warfare School also devised training packages for deploying units, as well as deploying cadre to Afghanistan to advise the COC.

Not saying the US mastered mountain warfare in Afghanistan, just pointing out how it fits into doctrine.

86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team - Wikipedia
 
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With increased protection , firepower, sensors, endurance and your troops not being knackered!

But once again, we seem to be using single case examples to argue something.
In some terrain, yes you will need to dismount fully, I even said as such originally.
Heads up, Listy, armoured vehicles are vulnerable, big bullet magnets that announce, "Here we are!", and never more so when they have to use roads and tracks. Do you know how long it takes to do a route clearance patrol to secure those areas that the vehicles will have to venture onto?
Yes it is knackering, but good NCOs and training keep the troops switched on far more effectively than clock watching for the moment that other half, or , third, relieve you.
Foot patrols work better than mobile patrols, and getting carried in and out, being resupplied by helicopter, is the far safer and efficient option.
 
Heads up, Listy, armoured vehicles are vulnerable, big bullet magnets that announce, "Here we are!", and never more so when they have to use roads and tracks. Do you know how long it takes to do a route clearance patrol to secure those areas that the vehicles will have to venture onto?
Yes it is knackering, but good NCOs and training keep the troops switched on far more effectively than clock watching for the moment that other half, or , third, relieve you.
Foot patrols work better than mobile patrols, and getting carried in and out, being resupplied by helicopter, is the far safer and efficient option.
The point of having vehicles with all wheel drive is that you don't have to use roads and tracks, and therefore don't need route clearance patrols.
 
AE4E14BB-1AFC-4D5B-9BF4-564126119E43.jpeg


Well known picture of Selous Scouts tracking and hunting terrs in the bush.




Shame its one of the many Rhodesian propaganda photos .
 

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The point of having vehicles with all wheel drive is that you don't have to use roads and tracks, and therefore don't need route clearance patrols.
Mountains , cliffs, lakes, bogs, private property, hedgerows, walls and fences
 
Most of which are impassable to light infantry, mounted or dismounted.
hahahahahaha seriously?

I must have dreamt climbing steep hills and mountains, over walls, hedges and fences, up cliffs, down cliffs, through bogs , over private property, in full fighting order.
 

Alamo

LE
I am old enough to be a Cold War warrior, and spent some time as a coy 2IC in 3RGJ. One of the things we did was sit on a reserve dem (the old and bold will remember). The one aspect no one would address was how we would have got there in the first place.
 
I am old enough to be a Cold War warrior, and spent some time as a coy 2IC in 3RGJ. One of the things we did was sit on a reserve dem (the old and bold will remember). The one aspect no one would address was how we would have got there in the first place.
I did many of those. More importantly we never briefed on exfiltration (aka:running away)
 
View attachment 674780

Well known picture of Selous Scouts tracking and hunting terrs in the bush.




Shame its one of the many Rhodesian propaganda photos .

Not entirely wrong though. Perhaps a combined model using Rhodie and SA tactics and kit might work. Bushmaster/Casspir/Buffel/VAB to bimble about, possibly supported by Ratel type kit in a heavier more conventional role. In a lighter fashion, three of the aforementioned taxis with troops that can laager up with the occupants of one vehicle providing security/mortar group while the other two sections patrol on foot to dominate the area using the laager as a fire base.

Sections can patrol as a full section patrol, or be split to patrol as small groups a la Rhodie to cover more ground and all are in contact with officer/SNCO in charge of the platoon strength group to run things from the laager. Support from mobile heavier kit like Ratel/Froggie Jaguar on the ground and a Fireforce type insertion capability using helos or aircraft on standby to put in stop groups or back up the friendlies in contact. Laager also highly mobile and can back up the sections as needed.

Groups to be rotated from active patrol to semi resting up on Fireforce, on whatever rota is deemed appropriate. Maintenance of vehicles done in this period.

Might be worth adding a medic and a drone operator and his kit to the protection/mortar group to keep an eye on the area for the patrolling sections. BA, bergens and other kit stays with the vehicles for light role and can be used as needed for whatever ops become necessary.

When mounted, the group is more mobile and operate as mounted infantry as circumstances require. Not going to be cheap, but you get what you pay for and training goes a long way. Might also be worth keeping the vehicles simple without too many electronic bells and whistles that can go wrong in engine management. Robust fittings and switches, basic instrumentation but a bit of troop comfort and good storage capacity, possibly under floor and in a central back rest/locker type arrangement with decent anchor points for safety gear.
 
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Alamo

LE
I did many of those. More importantly we never briefed on exfiltration (aka:running away)
I’ll never forget the look on the OC’s face when he came back off a recce patrol and I told him I’d blown it.

ETA - it was probably a fighting patrol.
 
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Not entirely wrong though. Perhaps a combined model using Rhodie and SA tactics and kit might work. Bushmaster/Casspir/Buffel/VAB to bimble about, possibly supported by Ratel type kit in a heavier more conventional role. In a lighter fashion, three of the aforementioned taxis with troops that can laager up with the occupants of one vehicle providing security/mortar group while the other two sections patrol on foot to dominate the area using the laager as a fire base.

Sections can patrol as a full section patrol, or be split to patrol as small groups a la Rhodie to cover more ground and all are in contact with officer/SNCO in charge of the platoon strength group to run things from the laager. Support from mobile heavier kit like Ratel/Froggie Jaguar on the ground and a Fireforce type insertion capability using helos or aircraft on standby to put in stop groups or back up the friendlies in contact. Laager also highly mobile and can back up the sections as needed.

Groups to be rotated from active patrol to semi resting up on Fireforce, on whatever rota is deemed appropriate. Maintenance of vehicles done in this period.

Might be worth adding a medic and a drone operator and his kit to the protection/mortar group to keep an eye on the area for the patrolling sections. BA, bergens and other kit stays with the vehicles for light role and can be used as needed for whatever ops become necessary.

When mounted, the group is more mobile and operate as mounted infantry as circumstances require. Not going to be cheap, but you get what you pay for and training goes a long way. Might also be worth keeping the vehicles simple without too many electronic bells and whistles that can go wrong in engine management. Robust fittings and switches, basic instrumentation but a bit of troop comfort and good storage capacity, possibly under floor and in a central back rest/locker type arrangement with decent anchor points for safety gear.
The Koevoet trackers wore similar kit but they were hanging onto the front of the Wolfs trying to track at speed , once on the spoor the rear Wolf would cut forward to see if it cut the spoor again or if lucky stop the runners.

Not really “livable“ the bush as you know, ammo and water , radios etc are required.
 
Did you do all that as part of a well planned move, or was it forced upon you by a lack of transport?
We did it all as foot patrols..... the clue is in the title, because foot patrols have advantages over vehicle patrols, and there is no land vehicle devised that can go everywhere a person on foot can, and driving through an area is just driving through an area.
 
The Koevoet trackers wore similar kit but they were hanging onto the front of the Wolfs trying to track at speed , once on the spoor the rear Wolf would cut forward to see if it cut the spoor again or if lucky stop the runners.

Not really “livable“ the bush as you know, ammo and water , radios etc are required.

I guess hot pursuit with a following team might be closer to what the pic depicts, rather than a three or four day patrol.
 

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