fierce critic of the Kremlins actions found dead.

#1
" I wonder if she was paid a visit by the Federal'naya Sluzhba Bezopasnosti !!"

Anna Politkovskaya, a prominent Russian journalist known as a fierce critic of the Kremlin's actions in Chechnya, has been found dead in Moscow.

She was found shot dead in a lift in a block of flats in the capital, the Interfax news agency said.

A pistol and four bullets were found near her body, it added, quoting unnamed police sources.

She fell seriously ill with food poisoning in 2004 which some believed to be an attempt on her life.

Ms Politkovskaya, who worked for the newspaper Novaya Gazeta, was known for exposing rights abuses by Russian troops in Chechnya.

She also acted as a negotiator with the Chechen rebels who held a siege in a Moscow theatre in 2002.
 
#5
Mad_Moriarty & razorman

I take it you are not aware that Anna Politkovskaya and Sergy were freinds?
 
#9

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#11
KGB_resident said:
armchair_jihad said:
Mad_Moriarty & razorman

I take it you are not aware that Anna Politkovskaya and Sergy were freinds?
We were not acquainted.

RIP.
God rest her - Slavu Bogu

Shamefully Sergei , it occurred to me to wonder how many other of her former close colleagues are saying the very same thing....

By an odd coincidence I am re-reading Fitzroy Maclean's Eastern Approaches. ISBN 0-14-013271-6

He was present as a young diplomat in Moscow in the late 1930's and witnessed first hand the chill wind of Stalin's purges:

'Fear hung over the city like a mist,seeping in everywhere. everyone lived in terror of everyone else . Agents of the NKVD were everywhere. Every day one could read in the papers commendations of soldiers who had denounced their officers, children who had 'unmasked' their fathers . No one could be trusted. No one was safe. '


...bit like Burma then....


Le Chevre
 
#13
AndyPipkin said:
I'm very dissappointed in you Sergey.


Surely you could have found some article blaming this on the CIA by now!?!?!?!
Andy!

I think that the murder was ordered by powerfull ruler of Chechnya Ramzan Kadyrov. Note, that the day of the killing 7 October is Putin's birthday. So it could be a 'birthday present' (in cruel oriental style).

Probably a professional killer was hired (likely ethnically Russian) and he very likely has been killed himself just after the murder. So chances to find real organisers are minimal.

In fact Both Washington administaration and Putin's regime were pleased to have such a journalist. Though for different reasons.

Washington had a possibility to say that Abu-Graib was not something special and beatings of prisoners took place in Chechnya.

Putin's regime had an excellent possibilty to demonstrate a 'freedom of press'. Really articles written by mrs.Politkovskaya were absolutely harmless.

Let's look at the metioned article

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/31/AR2006033101584.html

Recently two young college students from the Chechen capital of Grozny -- Musa Lomayev and Mikhail Vladovskikh -- were accused...
...
The plight of those sentenced for "Islamic terrorism" today is the same as that of the political prisoners of the Gulag Archipelago. They receive long terms -- 18 to 25 years in strict security camps in Siberian swamps and woods, with virtually all communication with the outside forbidden. Even the Red Cross is not admitted.
Such a terrible fairy-tale. Note, that the article had been published 1 April 2006 but a half year before it (October 4, 2005)

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2005/10/04/001-PR.html

...special correspondent Anna Politkovskaya describes a unique case -- Grozny students Musa Lomayev and Mikhail Vladovskikh accused of terrorism have been fully acquitted by the Supreme Court of the Chechen Republic.
So mrs.Politkovskaya was well aware that the students are free writing her fairy tales about 'new GULAG'.

It is possible to publish such an article in Washington Post but serious Russian newspapers would not publish it because it is factually incorrect.

Also, note that if mrs.Politkovskaya used such an 'example' to prove her point about massive oppressions then she simply hadn't other examples.
 
#14
By an odd coincidence I am re-reading Fitzroy Maclean's Eastern Approaches. ISBN 0-14-013271-6

He was present as a young diplomat in Moscow in the late 1930's and witnessed first hand the chill wind of Stalin's purges
If you want a memoir on the beginning of Soviet Russia try reading
http://www.questia.com/library/book/stormy-passage-a-personal-history-through-two-russian-revolutions-to-democracy-and-freedom-1905-1960-by-w-s-woytinsky.jsp

The American scholarly world and especially the labor movement
have known Wladimir Woytinsky and Emma, his wife and colleague,
for nearly three decades as quiet, effective, immensely learned scholars
of economics and political science. Their works, World Population
and Production and World Commerce and Governments, perhaps
their best-known books in English, have been mines of information
and ideas for many years. Few American readers realize that Wladimir
Woytinsky had lived with and been a part of the Russian social move-
ment since his student days in St. Petersburg; that he had entered the
Russian revolution as a student in 1905; that he had been a consistent
opponent of the Tsarist government; that he had known Lenin since
1906 and had broken with him in 1917. For a decade he had been in
and out of imperial prisons, fortresses, death cells, and Siberian peni-
tentiaries. As the Tsar fell, he preceded Lenin's return to
Petrograd
in 1917. He had been editor of Izvestia and part of the Petrograd
Soviet when the moderate socialists were overcome by the rising and
ruthless Bolshevist power. While exiled by the Tsarist government to
Irkutsk he had met Emma, daughter of a Siberian building contractor,
married her, and spent his honeymoon on the Mongolian border even
as Russia disintegrated in defeat in World War I and loosed the forces
of revolution throughout the world.

The passionate explosion in Petrograd, as Lenin overthrew Kerensky
and hunted the moderates out of Russia, found Woytinsky on the So-
cialist instead of the Communist side. Once more he became a fortress
prisoner. Facing a mob trial for his life (it was not the first occasion
of the sort), he escaped the Red Guards. In the ensuing confusion,
he and Emma made their way to Tiflis in the Caucasus. Thence he
came once more to Europe, via Constantinople, as a representative
of the then independent Republic of Georgia. When that country
was wiped out by the Soviet Union in 1922, Woytinsky was in Italy,
and in renewed tragedy as he watched Mussolini ride the tide of an-
archy to Fascist dictatorship.

He then settled in the Weimar Republic of Germany. In his new
exile he wrote in German and Russian his famous encyclopedic work
(in seven volumes), The World in Figures. It was an instant European
success. This established him as one of the foremost modern econo-
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#15
NEO_CON said:
By an odd coincidence I am re-reading Fitzroy Maclean's Eastern Approaches. ISBN 0-14-013271-6

He was present as a young diplomat in Moscow in the late 1930's and witnessed first hand the chill wind of Stalin's purges
If you want a memoir on the beginning of Soviet Russia try reading
[snip]
Thanks for the steer NEO - but forgive me if I find Maclean's book more to my taste ....his time as a junior diplomat in 30s Russia was followed by service with the fledgling SAS in the Western Desert in WW2.

He was then parachuted into Yugoslavia to link up with Tito's partisans and served alongside them until 1945.

Bit of a lad on the quiet - always nice to see an Old Etonian overcome the disadvantages of his upbringing...:p


Le Chevre
 

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