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Fidel Castro announces retirement

What is your attitude toward mr.Castro

  • Absolutely negative

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Mostly negative

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Rather negative

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Neutral

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Bad guy but overall a great figure

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I wish our leaders would have such skills as Fidel

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Not his fan but I like him

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • He is my ideal

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#61
As discussed on page three of this thread, here's 'Gorgeous' George Galloway losing it on Channel Four.

With added foaming at the mouth.
 
#62
Interesting question this. The US attitude to Cuba has been shaped by a number of factors, mostly political.

A number of US companies/families, notably Bacardi, had their assets in Cuba seized and nationalised when Castro kicked Batista out. There was a strong connection between them and various US political figures.

During the Cold War, they were on the other side - not somthing to please Americans looking for the Red under the Bed and were actively involved in promoting communism in Central/South America, again in opposition to the US.

In recent years, IMHO, the issue has been the number of ex-pat Cubans living in Florida. Florida is a faily important swing-State in US elections and this gives the local Cuban population an importance out of measure to their size. Politicians cannot afford to alienate them, and they are pretty fervently anti-Castro.

With the US elections coming up, the attitude of the various politicans will make this an interesting show. My guess is that they are watching their opinion polls very carefully on this subject.

There
 
#63
Yeh Cuba might be behind the times, but it has a certain charm. I don't think we will notice any real changes as long as any Castro is in power. But never mind Cuba, we need to be concentrating more about Great Britain for a change.
 
#64
Ancient_Mariner said:
Oh bloody hell.

I suppose this means Red Ken will be ordering a statue of Comrade Castro before he loses the London elections in May.
So who would win? This comedian Boris? (who has been bribed by Japanese firm).

I expect that 'red' Ken (rather blue Ken) would try please gay voters and the Muslims by new anti-Semitic scandal.

This silver fox is too experienced politician to lose so easily.

Btw, if you ask me who from British politicians is close to Fidel Castro by firmness, fearlessness, by integrity then first of all mrs.Thatcher springs to mind.
 
#65
Hi Gallowglass!

gallowglass said:
- the 'execution' of hundreds (thousands?) since 1959;
So how many exactly were executed during a half of century in Cuba? Let's compare it with other countries, Chile for example.

gallowglass said:
- the mass exodus of countless thousands of Cubans from the Socialist Paradise (where people would rather take their chances against the sharks than live in such revolutionary squalor)
Millions emigrated from small Irealand (your homeland) for economical reasons. Emigration due to economical reasons is not something special.

gallowglass said:
- the imprisonment of anyone for doing or saying anything which is interpreted as 'dissent' (for 'dissent' read 'desire for democratic freedoms')
I agree with your point. It's not good to imprison persons for years, especially without trial. And there are hundreds of such prisoners in Cuba - in Guantanamo.

gallowglass said:
- the 'intervention' in Angola, which I imagine an awful lot of dead Angolans are eternally 'grateful' for
By contrast, as I'm aware, peoples of Iraq and Afghanistan are extremely (there is a lot of extremists) 'grateful' to our American friends.
 
#66
Castro was and still is a tyrant.
If the 'septics' had handled Cuba with greater circumspection his own people would have got rid of him years ago.
 
#67
It's up to the Cubans there what happens next. They binned a dictator they didn't like in 1957 so I'm sure they'll do it again if they decide they need to.
Fidel might have done some bad things, but the US embargo has done a lot more damage to the place, and is quite needless. He's no worse than plenty of other b8stards that we've supported in the past.
 
#68
Had intended to respond to this earlier.

KGB_resident said:
Hi Gallowglass!

gallowglass said:
- the 'execution' of hundreds (thousands?) since 1959;
So how many exactly were executed during a half of century in Cuba? Let's compare it with other countries, Chile for example.
If you want to play the numbers game with the dead Sergey, then off you go. I'd direct you here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Cuba - and numerous other places on the internet, if you doubt that many were killed by the Castro regime. Are Pinochet's 15 years of rule in Chile suddenly the benchmark of dreadfulness for leftist apologists? One thing is for sure, those murdered in Chile and Cuba combined come nowhere near those murdered in Russia.

KGB_resident said:
gallowglass said:
- the mass exodus of countless thousands of Cubans from the Socialist Paradise (where people would rather take their chances against the sharks than live in such revolutionary squalor)
Millions emigrated from small Irealand (your homeland) for economical reasons. Emigration due to economical reasons is not something special.
That you believe people have fled Cuba purely for economic reasons shows two things - firstly, your admission that Cuba is not actually a functioning economy; and secondly, your ignorance of why people flee Cuba. Thanks for reminding me that Ireland is my homeland Sergey – there are times I forget…on a point of historical accuracy, Irish people were not prevented from leaving Ireland, whereas Cubans are effectively not free to leave Cuba (see my link above).

KGB_resident said:
gallowglass said:
- the imprisonment of anyone for doing or saying anything which is interpreted as 'dissent' (for 'dissent' read 'desire for democratic freedoms')
I agree with your point. It's not good to imprison persons for years, especially without trial. And there are hundreds of such prisoners in Cuba - in Guantanamo.
That's the sort of verbal smart-aleckry guaranteed to raise a laugh at a debate attended by the sort of anti-American students convinced of their own indispensability to society. I've said it before Sergey, but you're displaying the classic deflection technique of someone who'd rather not address the issue.

KGB_resident said:
gallowglass said:
- the 'intervention' in Angola, which I imagine an awful lot of dead Angolans are eternally 'grateful' for
By contrast, as I'm aware, peoples of Iraq and Afghanistan are extremely (there is a lot of extremists) 'grateful' to our American friends.
And how would you know Sergey, as you appear to take your lead from the likes of Chomsky and Michael Moore? Sure we all know that Saddam and the Taliban were paragons of virtue and benign rule….that sort of thinking held sway with some of the more recalcitrant types in Germany c. May 1945. Unlike you and others, I won't presume to speak for the people of Iraq or Afghanistan, but I'm inclined to believe that, if asked, the Iraqis would reject another decade or so of Saddam, or another two or three decades of his psychopathic sons; and the Afghans would reluctantly have to say no to the head-hackers of the Taliban.
 
#69
Hi Gallowglass!

I would like to make some comments, to agree and disagree with you on some points.

gallowglass said:
Had intended to respond to this earlier.

KGB_resident said:
Hi Gallowglass!

gallowglass said:
- the 'execution' of hundreds (thousands?) since 1959;
So how many exactly were executed during a half of century in Cuba? Let's compare it with other countries, Chile for example.
If you want to play the numbers game with the dead Sergey, then off you go. I'd direct you here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Cuba - and numerous other places on the internet, if you doubt that many were killed by the Castro regime. Are Pinochet's 15 years of rule in Chile suddenly the benchmark of dreadfulness for leftist apologists? One thing is for sure, those murdered in Chile and Cuba combined come nowhere near those murdered in Russia.
Let's not discuss Russia. In our case it is irrelevant.

Of course, there were political executions in Cuba. However, it happened long ago. That time political culture in Latin America (and in the World) was different. There were wars in Algeria, in Vientnam, countless, frequently bloody military coups. It doesn't mean that I aprove political killings but in the case with Cuba it was not something outstanding, rather it was in line with existed realities on the ground. Suppose that Fidel Castro would grant his political enemies all civil freedoms. Well, likely he would be overthrown and killed himself and now would be forgotten as a loser.

gallowglass said:
KGB_resident said:
gallowglass said:
- the mass exodus of countless thousands of Cubans from the Socialist Paradise (where people would rather take their chances against the sharks than live in such revolutionary squalor)
Millions emigrated from small Irealand (your homeland) for economical reasons. Emigration due to economical reasons is not something special.
That you believe people have fled Cuba purely for economic reasons shows two things - firstly, your admission that Cuba is not actually a functioning economy;
Yes, I agree with you. Cuba was (and is) not successful country from economical point of view. Though, look at nearby Haiti and Cuba would look as almost paradise.

gallowglass said:
and secondly, your ignorance of why people flee Cuba. Thanks for reminding me that Ireland is my homeland Sergey – there are times I forget…on a point of historical accuracy, Irish people were not prevented from leaving Ireland, whereas Cubans are effectively not free to leave Cuba (see my link above).
Again, I agree with you. The Cubans were prevented to leave the country for ideological causes. As for the main reason to settle in the USA then the Cubans wanted (and want) prosperous life, ability to have good paid work... Look at the Mexicans. What are they seeking in the USA? Maybe political freedoms? Political freedoms is not butter and freedom of speech is not a bread to eat them.

By the way, suppose that tomorrow there would be no restrictions for Cubans to leave the island. Well, I suspect that our American friends would impose such restrictions.

gallowglass said:
KGB_resident said:
gallowglass said:
- the imprisonment of anyone for doing or saying anything which is interpreted as 'dissent' (for 'dissent' read 'desire for democratic freedoms')
I agree with your point. It's not good to imprison persons for years, especially without trial. And there are hundreds of such prisoners in Cuba - in Guantanamo.
That's the sort of verbal smart-aleckry guaranteed to raise a laugh at a debate attended by the sort of anti-American students convinced of their own indispensability to society. I've said it before Sergey, but you're displaying the classic deflection technique of someone who'd rather not address the issue.
However, as I see you understand my point.

gallowglass said:
KGB_resident said:
gallowglass said:
- the 'intervention' in Angola, which I imagine an awful lot of dead Angolans are eternally 'grateful' for
By contrast, as I'm aware, peoples of Iraq and Afghanistan are extremely (there is a lot of extremists) 'grateful' to our American friends.
And how would you know Sergey, as you appear to take your lead from the likes of Chomsky and Michael Moore? Sure we all know that Saddam and the Taliban were paragons of virtue and benign rule….that sort of thinking held sway with some of the more recalcitrant types in Germany c. May 1945. Unlike you and others, I won't presume to speak for the people of Iraq or Afghanistan, but I'm inclined to believe that, if asked, the Iraqis would reject another decade or so of Saddam, or another two or three decades of his psychopathic sons; and the Afghans would reluctantly have to say no to the head-hackers of the Taliban.
I'm not sure that you uinderstand me pretty well. The Cubans participated (using military force) in export of ideology, in export of political solutions in statebuilding. And our American friends (with British help) are doing exactly the same thing.

Well, later or soner Cuba would have more or less democratic political system. But would it be pro-American. I'm not sure.
 

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