fFrench diy kit?

I need to install a new concrete ring beam. Tight space and complex job, mainly due to snotty neighbour restricting access and not wanting scaffold on his crappy piece of scrap strewn, weed infested, dog shit covered "lawn".
I seem to recall seeing in France a small metal bar, slightly bent, a bit like a metal door handle that is secured to a wall below the wooden form and then when tapped in it will hold the form in place while under it's own pressure. Similar to a shutter latch.
I've tried Google, but as I don't know what they are called I have not a clue what I should be looking for.
Anyone got any ideas?
 

Polyester

War Hero
I need to install a new concrete ring beam. Tight space and complex job, mainly due to snotty neighbour restricting access and not wanting scaffold on his crappy piece of scrap strewn, weed infested, dog shit covered "lawn".
I seem to recall seeing in France a small metal bar, slightly bent, a bit like a metal door handle that is secured to a wall below the wooden form and then when tapped in it will hold the form in place while under it's own pressure. Similar to a shutter latch.
I've tried Google, but as I don't know what they are called I have not a clue what I should be looking for.
Anyone got any ideas?
Holdfast?
 

Attachments

  • 0E64EFB7-C252-4874-B7FF-9E6BB96553A2.jpeg
    0E64EFB7-C252-4874-B7FF-9E6BB96553A2.jpeg
    468.5 KB · Views: 31
As an aside. ‘fF’ (as it appears in the thread title) should properly be written as ‘ff’ or 'F'.
The English legal handwriting of the Middle Ages has no capital F. A double f (ff) was used to represent the capital letter.​

Now, back to the scaffolding... I have a couple of sacks full of putlog holes if they are of any use to you. Being a helpful sort and generous to a fault, I can do you a good bogoff deal on them if you are interested.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
What @Polyester said.

We had an old school brickie on site years ago, used it to hold battens on a wall as a guide for a Stihl Saw running down it for new door openings. More commonly used in Wood Workshops.

GramHF_1860.jpg
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
@Arte_et_Marte kinda reminds me of the flattened end length of copper trick with a screw through it
Aye, I know what you mean. The one I saw being used, and asked about, was just like the one in that picture. The end you can't see was about 3"long and pointed and could be hammered into the morter between bricks. Fast and efficient. The brickie told me it was German. I've never seen one since.
 
For the un-educated (in these matters), how is it used in buildings?
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
For the un-educated (in these matters), how is it used in buildings?
Imagine a solid brick wall and the customer wants to put a door in that wall. It's a straightforward job. Two vertical cuts are made in the brickwork, the space between the cuts is where the new door will eventually go.

To get a nice vertical cut with something like a petrol Shtil Saw, which is fairly heavy, noisy and chucks out a tremendous amount of brick dust, takes some practice to cut a perfectly straight line and is a skill. To make that job easier a wooden batten can placed on the vertical line, clamped in place with the aforementioned holdfast and the Saw is guided down the wall much easier.

Of course the battens could be screwed to the wall, involving drilling holes, inserting rawlplugs and appropriate screws. Meaning 5 minutes work instead of 10 seconds.
 
I think the item you're looking for is called Dutch Pin.


To be honest, I don't recall that being the name used by stonemasons of my acquaintance but that's the term that matches the pictures.
 
Imagine a solid brick wall and the customer wants to put a door in that wall. It's a straightforward job. Two vertical cuts are made in the brickwork, the space between the cuts is where the new door will eventually go.

To get a nice vertical cut with something like a petrol Shtil Saw, which is fairly heavy, noisy and chucks out a tremendous amount of brick dust, takes some practice to cut a perfectly straight line and is a skill. To make that job easier a wooden batten can placed on the vertical line, clamped in place with the aforementioned holdfast and the Saw is guided down the wall much easier.

Of course the battens could be screwed to the wall, involving drilling holes, inserting rawlplugs and appropriate screws. Meaning 5 minutes work instead of 10 seconds.
Thank you, every day a training day
 
Imagine a solid brick wall and the customer wants to put a door in that wall. It's a straightforward job. Two vertical cuts are made in the brickwork, the space between the cuts is where the new door will eventually go.

To get a nice vertical cut with something like a petrol Shtil Saw, which is fairly heavy, noisy and chucks out a tremendous amount of brick dust, takes some practice to cut a perfectly straight line and is a skill. To make that job easier a wooden batten can placed on the vertical line, clamped in place with the aforementioned holdfast and the Saw is guided down the wall much easier.
Before everybody starts installing additional doors...

Bear in mind that a 12" diamond blade only cuts to about 4" depth. That's less than the depth of an imperial brick and about the same depth as a metric brick. You'll also need to remove the timber guide to get this far.

If you cut along the line of the perpends (assuming that the wall was built by a brickie who can get the perpends in line), you'll have half of the work to do because you'll be cutting through half as many bricks.

You'll also need to install a lintel, sensibly before you start cutting.

If it's an external cavity wall, you also need to think about cavity trays, closers, damp proof courses, remedial ties and maybe brick pillars.

There's more but the point I'm trying to put across is that you don't start the job by hiring a disc cutter and merrily cutting away. Plan the job first.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
I think the item you're looking for is called Dutch Pin.


To be honest, I don't recall that being the name used by stonemasons of my acquaintance but that's the term that matches the pictures.
Them's the exact Badgers. I thought they were German. Nice one.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Before everybody starts installing additional doors...

Bear in mind that a 12" diamond blade only cuts to about 4" depth. That's less than the depth of an imperial brick and about the same depth as a metric brick. You'll also need to remove the timber guide to get this far.

If you cut along the line of the perpends (assuming that the wall was built by a brickie who can get the perpends in line), you'll have half of the work to do because you'll be cutting through half as many bricks.

You'll also need to install a lintel, sensibly before you start cutting.

If it's an external cavity wall, you also need to think about cavity trays, closers, damp proof courses, remedial ties and maybe brick pillars.

There's more but the point I'm trying to put across is that you don't start the job by hiring a disc cutter and merrily cutting away. Plan the job first.
Aye, sort of. Of course a plan is necessary, and it helps if you know what your doing! I've done hundreds successfully but it can go wrong very easily, very quickly and very expensively.

The big vertical cuts can actually happen before the lintel stuff, and usually are.

With a cavity wall, a hole is drilled through both the walls and measurements taken from the centre of the hole to the cuts either side. Equate those measurements on the inside from the hole and that's where more vertical lines are drawn for the stitch drilling that's needed before dismantling the inner wall. This wall usually takes longer to take down, because of the stitch drilling and often the layers of concrete render and plaster.

Once the support Acros are in place the lintel situation can then be sorted and the walls can be removed.

But as Puttees intimates, it really isn't a DIY job.
 
Imagine a solid brick wall and the customer wants to put a door in that wall. It's a straightforward job. Two vertical cuts are made in the brickwork, the space between the cuts is where the new door will eventually go.

To get a nice vertical cut with something like a petrol Shtil Saw, which is fairly heavy, noisy and chucks out a tremendous amount of brick dust, takes some practice to cut a perfectly straight line and is a skill. To make that job easier a wooden batten can placed on the vertical line, clamped in place with the aforementioned holdfast and the Saw is guided down the wall much easier.

Of course the battens could be screwed to the wall, involving drilling holes, inserting rawlplugs and appropriate screws. Meaning 5 minutes work instead of 10 seconds.


110% accurate, do it all the time when fitting new windows and doors when adjustments need making. As long as the lintels are placed correctly enough to support adjustments.
(Or just do what every other man jack seems to do now and whack it full of spray foam and sillycunt !!!!)
 
110% accurate, do it all the time when fitting new windows and doors when adjustments need making. As long as the lintels are placed correctly enough to support adjustments.
(Or just do what every other man jack seems to do now and whack it full of spray foam and sillycunt !!!!)

Slight thread drift, engines are offline Captain...............

There we go knowledgeably using words like lintels; I sometimes wonder how septic houses stay standing with the way they use lintels here. Many is the time I have seen a garage door, or window spanning lintel laying on 6", or 7" of brick at one end and a whopping 2" at the other. But then, what passes as footing here can be as deep as 0". Yes, you read right, zero inches deep. It is dependant on the location in the country, but in Florida they are allowed to get away with a slab on grade (4 inches thick) as there is no freezing so they don't see the need for any depth of footing. Bugger the fact that Florida is effectively a sand bank that is constantly shifting. I never saw one house in Florida from $100K to $ multi-million that did not have slab cracks which would put the willys up a UK county engineer, or building inspector. It is the same here in Texas where the footing depth is around 22", high clay content ground soil, expanding and contracting depending on the time of year, causing shift and cracking. It pains me when I buy a house here, the house before this one was a $million house and it would not have come close to passing building regs in the UK. It is an accepted fact that houses here are built to last no more than 50 years, and even then they need more or less constant maintenance.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Slight thread drift, engines are offline Captain...............

There we go knowledgeably using words like lintels; I sometimes wonder how septic houses stay standing with the way they use lintels here. Many is the time I have seen a garage door, or window spanning lintel laying on 6", or 7" of brick at one end and a whopping 2" at the other. But then, what passes as footing here can be as deep as 0". Yes, you read right, zero inches deep. It is dependant on the location in the country, but in Florida they are allowed to get away with a slab on grade (4 inches thick) as there is no freezing so they don't see the need for any depth of footing. Bugger the fact that Florida is effectively a sand bank that is constantly shifting. I never saw one house in Florida from $100K to $ multi-million that did not have slab cracks which would put the willys up a UK county engineer, or building inspector. It is the same here in Texas where the footing depth is around 22", high clay content ground soil, expanding and contracting depending on the time of year, causing shift and cracking. It pains me when I buy a house here, the house before this one was a $million house and it would not have come close to passing building regs in the UK. It is an accepted fact that houses here are built to last no more than 50 years, and even then they need more or less constant maintenance.
Ha! Believe it or not, there are plenty of properties in the UK that haven't got a lintel above at least one window. Especially old bungalows, and to make up for it there will be a 200kg concrete lintel above a tiny kitchen door.

1950's building regs. Bizarre.
 
So true and to think you can pick up a prestressed lintel for about a fiver now. I have worked on a few properties that just had 3 x 3 fence posts chopped in and rendered over.
 

Latest Threads

Top