Ferret

S

syledis

Guest
#1
On Sons of Guns right now they are working on a ferret, and i was wondering if anyone remembered it and knew its history.

Its reg was 33BA34
 
#2
I don't know who Sons of Guns are but I googled the registration number and it's in New Orleans owned by some guy called Dave. Some of the info on there seems suspect, he's saying the engine was Rolls Royce, IIRC it was a Daimler, top speed 53 mph, I'm sure mine did a lot more than that. Still a nice motor to drive except in very bad weather, like all armour!!!
 
#4
I had a quick go of one at Moreton-in-Marsh Fire Services College late 80s/early 90s. I'd have liked a bit more time to get used to the pre-selector gearbox which was fun.
 
#6
I don't know who Sons of Guns are but I googled the registration number and it's in New Orleans owned by some guy called Dave. Some of the info on there seems suspect, he's saying the engine was Rolls Royce, IIRC it was a Daimler, top speed 53 mph, I'm sure mine did a lot more than that. Still a nice motor to drive except in very bad weather, like all armour!!!
The motor in mine was a Rolls Royce B60, straight six. Mine had a top speed of 65 mph on the dial but I am not sure how accurate that was.
 
#7
Sons of Guns fucked it anyway........
No Ferret deserves all the crap they put on that (anyone making a link with Chutney?)
The only one I've ever seen in the flesh is outside the Guards Chapel on Birdcage walk, it's called a Daimler Ferret - so I guess there were two types?
 
#8
Sons of Guns fucked it anyway........
No Ferret deserves all the crap they put on that (anyone making a link with Chutney?)
The only one I've ever seen in the flesh is outside the Guards Chapel on Birdcage walk, it's called a Daimler Ferret - so I guess there were two types?
Loads of things had Rolls Royce B series engines from the Austin Champ to the Alvis Stalwart. It was intended as a standard engine for military vehicles. There were 4, 6 and 8 cylinder versions for different applications. They had many common spares.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
I remember them cutting about when sigs were still at scarborough and a few around york but nothing after 89 or so.

I think the local yeomany used them to try and kill their officers
 
#10
IIRC all Ferrets were built by Daimler with RR B60 engines. Daimler got the contract in the late 40s because they built the wartime Dingo scout car on which the Ferret was based. As Ex_Stab says, the B series engines were supposed to be standardised across the vehicle fleet.

There were a few Ferrets around in the Sappers early in my career. 32 Armd had them as recce vehicles right up to Granby and they were still around in the UK regiments up to 92 when the Options for Change orbats kicked in.

Not the safest of wagons to drive around in, particularly for commanders if they sat on the turret hatch. There was a myth that there were over 52 deaths in a single year in the early 70s from rollovers.
 
#11
I used to drive one and theyre were a pig compared to modern light armour i did like the pre select gearbox, select then stamp the pedal they change up. then moved onto that high tech thing the Cent ARRV the main winch in that was run my the same engine if i remember.
took lads to tank museum for a day out and was amazed to see loads of kit i worked on in there and i am still serving.
needle roller bearings in the Fox/ferret always prone to pull the hub off and drop 250 all over the place, days before total quality.
 
#12
When at 5 Sqn I was the Plant Troop Commanders driver for a couple of exercises, and driving the Ferret was always a perverse pleasure. The Steering wheel was what threw most people and the fact you were totally reliant on the commander to direct you anywhere other than forwards.
 
#14
I drove a red one in BATUS in 93 as part of the range safety. Loads of fun driving in the rain and mud whilst trying to avoid target holes.
 
#16
UN Scout Car Sqn UNFICYP 1983, cracking vehicle especially driving in the DANCON area. Ref safety staff in BATUS one of our MBT took the Ferret turret and head off one of the safety staff with the NBC pack, when he got too close whilst "jockeying" RIP.
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#17
Used Ferrets on Ops in Beirut in the early 1980's, mine was sent home sick after some damage! Definately had a RR B60, wonderful engine. The fluid flywheel was a bit of a bitch to service and the planet carriers on the wheels were unreliable but that may have been due to age.

As the driver of 12C it was squeeze (as I was 6 ft 4 in those days) but I really enjoyed driving them and once you got used to the upside down steering wheel, the GCP and the reverse selector they were fairly easy to drive (at that time I did not have a car licence or my track licence, those were the days!!).

Great in an urban environment (but commander was vulnerable, closing down was not really an option or sensible), but the .30 with cloth belt was not reliable or accurate. Later on they got the gpmg.
 

Attachments

#18
I was on Ferrets and Saladins when C Sqn 1 RTR was the SBA Sqn in Epi in 1983. We were on Outstations in Pergamos when another troop from 1 RTR, which was covering the UN troop in Nicosia, came down for a visit, which explains the disparity in berets and the white wagons.

I enjoyed the Ferret, we only had one serious loss when one slipped off a mountain road- OC 4 Tp had to make the command decision to drop the tow rope otherwise it would have dragged another one over with it. Minor accidents occurred with goat tracks giving way under the weight of the veh but patrols through Ayia Napa up to Cape Greco were fun.

Also attached is a picture of a Sqn Saladin looking down on Happy Valley.
 

Attachments

#19
Used Ferrets on Ops in Beirut in the early 1980's, mine was sent home sick after some damage! Definately had a RR B60, wonderful engine. The fluid flywheel was a bit of a bitch to service and the planet carriers on the wheels were unreliable but that may have been due to age.

As the driver of 12C it was squeeze (as I was 6 ft 4 in those days) but I really enjoyed driving them and once you got used to the upside down steering wheel, the GCP and the reverse selector they were fairly easy to drive (at that time I did not have a car licence or my track licence, those were the days!!).

Great in an urban environment (but commander was vulnerable, closing down was not really an option or sensible), but the .30 with cloth belt was not reliable or accurate. Later on they got the gpmg.
We were on standby to go and get the Ferrets from Beirut- ended up having to go down to Akrotiri to help move them after they were brought across from Beirut on the LSL (seem to remember a lot of A&SH cars got dumped there to make space for them but that may just be an urban myth!) never seen wagons so bombed up in my life!!
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#20
I drove one in Germany in late 60s. We had two types in the battalion; a gunned up version, with I believe a .30 Browning and the open-topped one for use as a command veh. We were 432 heavy but company commander had a ferret for his or csm's use. Difficult to get in driver's hatch, as I was not really a racing snake, and with 58 pattern webbing on it was a squeeze, but there was a knack to it.
Pre-select was good, providing you didn't put it in some bloody stupidly low gear when driving along at a clip. Handbrake was between the thighs, and always a worry.

Radio fixings, 'c' boxes etc were hazardous to head. Only drove it once with windscreen hood on, and that was in a horrible sleety rain drive from Celle to Hamburg, en route to Libya. The hood made it warm and cosy!

I especially liked the reverse. Throw a lever and all the gears worked backwards.
 
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