Female P Coy Pass

I wonder if all this publicty might be a poison chalice with the press looking for scandal. The lady doctor from the RN who passed several years back seems to have kept a low profile.
I'm just wondering why someone is taking pictures of a P Coy OC off duty and down town.
If this lass has passed the course on her own merits, bloody good for her, I know I couldn't do it.

And the photos I've seen are very much mobile phone pics taken a bit sneakily. Maybe someone attempting to discredit the fact that she's passed the course? I don't know, two officers sat on a window sill. Has she passed the course when the pics were taken? Is the bloke just giving her advice on the BPC maybe.
A picture can paint a thousand words, it can also tell a thousand lies.
 
Frankly, the current state of dress is a mess - reflects the current generation perhaps, but I see the lads in and around Brecon looking like heaps of washing waiting to be done.

Not their fault I guess, they deal with what they have. I'm sure it's more fit for purpose - looks sloppy though.
What's missing is some sewn in creases. Old school smartness by deception.
 
What's missing is some sewn in creases. Old school smartness by deception.
The only people I saw with sewn-in creases were corps types. Even our useless idle fat knackers weren’t prepared to face the opprobrium that horrible affectation would bring.
However those unpressed denims look equally shit.
 
Felix is alive and well, reincarnated as my cat Sidney.

We live in the middle of 15 acres, but no birds, no rabbits, it's like walking around Belsen.
Felix thought a lot of himself, imagining he was some sort of supercat. His party piece was going creeping up behind you and going from a ground level standing start and jumping up onto your shoulders. Unfortunatly he sometimes misjudged this by about a foot or two (actually he often did) and cue much feline embarrasment and shrieks of pain as he had to dig his claws in and climb the gap until he reached your shoulder.

Me: Arggggggg.

Felix: Shit, I have fucked this up again. No kitikat for me tonight. Looks like I am going to have to eat out again.

We had a female cat called Katie. She was a grumpy miserable moggy who got fat and just used to eat, sleep and watch day time TV.

Anyway no more cat stories, back on thread - honest.
 
More 'Ride of the Sit-On Mower' than 'Ride of the Valkyries'?

I stand slouch corrected.
It doesn't stop the never-served wretch calling everyone 'hats'.

I too have never served (unless a stint in the UOTC counts; I really hope it doesn't) but I'm not going to tear down an a achievement that's hugely nails just because she's got norks.

She did it under the same circumstances as the blokes, so fair play.

These lasses are damned if they do, damned if they don't. If they wrap on an arduous course like thousands of blokes before them, they can't hack it because they're birds. They crack it, standards must have slipped.

Same happened with women pilots back in the day, much noise by those who'd never taken a set of controls in their life. Ffwd, no-one bats an eyelid that female pilots are making the grade, and one of the few DFCs dished out since the war has gone to a female, and considering her actions, bloody well earned, too.
 

Mölders 1

Clanker
It doesn't stop the never-served wretch calling everyone 'hats'.

I too have never served (unless a stint in the UOTC counts; I really hope it doesn't) but I'm not going to tear down an a achievement that's hugely nails just because she's got norks.

She did it under the same circumstances as the blokes, so fair play.

These lasses are damned if they do, damned if they don't. If they wrap on an arduous course like thousands of blokes before them, they can't hack it because they're birds. They crack it, standards must have slipped.

Same happened with women pilots back in the day, much noise by those who'd never taken a set of controls in their life. Ffwd, no-one bats an eyelid that female pilots are making the grade, and one of the few DFCs dished out since the war has gone to a female, and considering her actions, bloody well earned, too.
Well l know l am going to burn in hell for writing this but........

I feel that a woman passing P Company (and before that the A.A.C.C.) takes something away from the reputation of those Training Courses.
Call it Male Ego, Toxic Masculinity or whatever you will.

I have to ask that seeing only a few females are ever likely to pass such courses, are more likely to get seriously injured, leave earluer, is it really worth opening them up to women? Some young men might see what has just happened with P Company and might think again about giving it a try and/or some men currently in 16 A.A. Brigade might even leave now there is a woman amongst them.

As for Women Pilots, seeing as the R.A.F. R.N. and A.A.C. managed nigh on 50 years without them and the fact that only a small percentage of pilots are Female and that they have a higher wash-out rate in Flight Training and are more likely to leave their respective Service earlier than men, again l ask was opening up Flight Training/Aircrew to women really worth the results?

Okay l am ready to meet my maker.........
 
Well l know l am going to burn in hell for writing this but........

I feel that a woman passing P Company (and before that the A.A.C.C.) takes something away from the reputation of those Training Courses.
Call it Male Ego, Toxic Masculinity or whatever you will.

I have to ask that seeing only a few females are ever likely to pass such courses, are more likely to get seriously injured, leave earluer, is it really worth opening them up to women? Some young men might see what has just happened with P Company and might think again about giving it a try and/or some men currently in 16 A.A. Brigade might even leave now there is a woman amongst them.

As for Women Pilots, seeing as the R.A.F. R.N. and A.A.C. managed nigh on 50 years without them and the fact that only a small percentage of pilots are Female and that they have a higher wash-out rate in Flight Training and are more likely to leave their respective Service earlier than men, again l ask was opening up Flight Training/Aircrew to women really worth the results?

Okay l am ready to meet my maker.........
Some things in life are a challenge, and arduous. Are you suggesting, that because a woman reaches the summit of Everest, that earlier male climbers would wish they hadn't bothered, because it is somehow now less challenging?


Bigger plums than me, you and the rest of Arrse put together.

Yes, we are talking a very small %, but a pass is a pass, gender is irrelevant.
 
Well l know l am going to burn in hell for writing this but........

I feel that a woman passing P Company (and before that the A.A.C.C.) takes something away from the reputation of those Training Courses.
Call it Male Ego, Toxic Masculinity or whatever you will.

I have to ask that seeing only a few females are ever likely to pass such courses, are more likely to get seriously injured, leave earluer, is it really worth opening them up to women? Some young men might see what has just happened with P Company and might think again about giving it a try and/or some men currently in 16 A.A. Brigade might even leave now there is a woman amongst them.

As for Women Pilots, seeing as the R.A.F. R.N. and A.A.C. managed nigh on 50 years without them and the fact that only a small percentage of pilots are Female and that they have a higher wash-out rate in Flight Training and are more likely to leave their respective Service earlier than men, again l ask was opening up Flight Training/Aircrew to women really worth the
Agreed re injury rates, but a few questions:

1. How different are the "leave earlier" rates for female aircrew compared to male aircrew?

2. How different are the "leave earlier" rates from female aircrew to female non-aircrew?

3. How do you know that females who pass arduous courses will leave earlier than males who pass them, or females who don't even attempt them?

4. "some men currently in 16 A.A. Brigade might even leave now there is a woman amongst them" - there have been women in 16X since it was founded in 1999.
 

daywalker

LE
Kit Reviewer
Just to clarify, if you spoke to any serving paratrooper (and I class this as someone badged Para regt) they would pretty much all say that it isn’t P Coy that makes them paratroopers, yes it is a right of passage into airborne forces HOWEVER it is depot para that makes them paratroopers.

P Coy is looked at as a steady week in depot for the joes as you’re only getting thrashed twice that day and you know exactly what you are doing for that period with no surprises, it’s generally only attached arms (Hats) who look at P Coy as the gold standard and then live off that course for ever more.

I’m not trying to take anything away from her as long as she passed without any adjustment of the standards however the only thing AAPPS qualifies her for is to serve in the air assault brigade....she is NOT a paratrooper as that title should exclusively be reserved for those who have passed out of depot para.

Passing depot para and passing AAPPS are two very different things set at very different levels.
 
the only thing AAPPS qualifies her for is to serve in the air assault brigade.
AAPPS doesn't "qualify" you to serve in the Brigade. I, and thousands of others, served in 16X without any such qualification.

Edit: I guess that it "qualifies her" (in lieu of certain other courses / appointments) to attend the BPC. That's it.
 
Last edited:

Mölders 1

Clanker
Agreed re injury rates, but a few questions:

1. How different are the "leave earlier" rates for female aircrew compared to male aircrew?

2. How different are the "leave earlier" rates from female aircrew to female non-aircrew?

3. How do you know that females who pass arduous courses will leave earlier than males who pass them, or females who don't even attempt them?

4. "some men currently in 16 A.A. Brigade might even leave now there is a woman amongst them" - there have been women in 16X since it was founded in 1999.

I can answer the first two questions in part with this comment from a former R.A.F. Pilot who commented on an article in the Daily Telegraph some time last year.......Harry Flashman



When I was serving, combat efficient trained aircrew cost well over 2 million and took 3-4 years to train (depending on the role)

Similar with engineering officers, and even longer if they were on a University Education pre -entry programme.

As a consequence we we required to serve to age 38, or 16 years commissioned service - sound economics if the service wishes to amortise training costs.



When this training was opened to women, the economics went to hell, very few served anywhere near long enough to amortise the large taxpayer investment in their training.

MoD can't force a married woman with a family to continue serving. Common sense went out the window to pursue the objective of showing the forces were an equal opportunity organisation, thus it was a justification to waste of taxpayers' money and resources
 
As a non jumper ie no I won’t jump out a perfectly serviceable aircraft. Now the lass has got her maroon lid, would she now go on to get her wings ?
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
1979/1980ish.
I am aware of a girl who passed selection for a specialist role that did not involve jumping out of a plane.

On being told she had passed she immediately RTU'd herself.

She explained she completed the course to prove something to herself but then said she thought she could never ever pull the trigger.


edit...
The date was more probably 1980-1981ish
 
Last edited:

QRK2

LE
1979/1980ish.
I am aware of a girl who passed selection for a specialist role that did not involve jumping out of a plane.

On being told she had passed she immediately RTU'd herself.

She explained she completed the course to prove something to herself but then said she thought she could never ever pull the trigger.
I've known an RM YO do the same thing after their Cdo Cse - no more relevant than your comment though.
 
3. How do you know that females who pass arduous courses will leave earlier than males who pass them, or females who don't even attempt them?
I think that sort of “restlessness” - a constant striving- is quite common amongst very high performers. Singular achievements which would be a life goal for most of us are a mere stepping stone for these polymath types. This lady certainly appears to be one of those.
 

Latest Threads

Top