Female Engagement Teams

#1
Afternoon all

Quick question to see if anyone has any information on the role of Female Engagement Teams?

It keeps getting brought up as a potential role on an upcoming deployment but no-one seems to have very much information about the role itself...

Any info welcome.

Cheers
 
#2
#3

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
Afternoon all

Quick question to see if anyone has any information on the role of Female Engagement Teams?

It keeps getting brought up as a potential role on an upcoming deployment but no-one seems to have very much information about the role itself...

Any info welcome.

Cheers
I don't actually think the British Army has FETs, but female British soldiers do get posted to USMC course in theatre. See link for Clerk & Medic sent over to a FET course in Bastion: First UK soldiers join Female Engagement Team - British Army Website
 
#5
Hi,
This is a growing area for the british army out in theatre. currently there is a small team based out of LKG in theatre. the main role seems to be meeting females at preplanned shurahs. Topics discussed are health, employement and general female things. guests speakers are brought along such as nurses to carry out health checks and also give out advice and also vet corp who advise on animal health. Female terps are used.
the girls i have spoken to enjoy it.
any direct questions PM me as i know someone who is currently deployed in this role.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#7
Definately a UK capability - MOB/FOB based, working as part of the infleunce effort participating in shuras on female health,education etc.

Can also be co-opted into wider operations as female searchers etc so candidates need to have enough tactical acumen/fitness etc to work alongside the rifle coys. A very good job with plenty of variety if you get the chance to do it.
 
#8
Should add that its only open to females, despite FETs being seen as the "third sex".
 
#12
An example of what's been achieved previously:
Navy News 15 Dec 2010 said:
10121501ax_w600h600.jpg
FAR from her natural environment, Lt Hannah West shares her knowledge on the weapons
range with women who’ve volunteered to serve in the Afghan National Police


It is this advice – and that imparted by five Senior Service comrades – which helped win a coveted humanitarian award. The Firmin Sword of Peace – known as Wilkinson for 40 years until sword manufacturers Firmin & Son took over sponsorship – is presented each year to the Forces unit judged to have made the most valuable contribution to humanitarian activities at home or abroad. In 2010, the tri-Service Military Stabilisation Support Group was deemed worthy of the title. The 40-strong group largely comprises Army personnel, bolstered by half a dozen sailors and a similar number from the RAF...

The six sailors – Lts West and Gary McCormack, Coxn John Adam and CPOs Neil Smith, Wiggy Bennett and Bernie Cresswell – were scattered around Helmand: Lashkar Gah, Musa Qaleh, Nad-e-Ali, Garmsir, Gereshk and Sangin. As the only female member of the Naval contingent serving with the group, Lt West – an air engineer by trade – was based in the provincial capital Lashkar Gah and was heavily involved in working with Helmand’s women. Under the Taleban the latter suffered terrible oppression – they were stripped of almost all rights, education and dignity, and were barely allowed to appear in public. Nearly a decade after the Taleban’s fall and progress is such that there is now a small, but growing, number of women serving with the Afghan police, there’s a government department overseeing women’s affairs, and regular shuras – meetings – are held to discuss female issues.

Liberated from the Taleban yoke, Helmand’s women are no longer shy about voicing their opinions – “they gave the policeman a real grilling” at one shura, said Lt West now serving at Abbey Wood on the Chinook project team. “Women are keen to get involved with the police and work with the provincial councils – especially in the urban areas. It’s rather more difficult in the rural parts.”
(more)
 
#16
My pleasure. I found it particularly interesting owing to the involvement of RN personnel. Little is heard of their surprisingly large presence in Afghanistan in all manner of peculiar roles.
 

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