Fcuk me its humid, sweaty and superb

#63
I met a lovely girl from Middridge a couple of weeks ago in France. She was staying with Scotch Tom in Couture with her daughter who lives in Darlo.
Knows the Bay Horse well. Small world..
We went there for lunch on Thursday. It's always really busy, but they still manage to get the food out quickly.

And they have "real" chips, as opposed to "plastic" ones. Which is always nice.
 
#64
Looked out the window this morning to check the weather; scorchio, well no change there. Brown is obviously the new green. Getting enough feed for the animals is going to be expensive this winter. Used to hear the neighbours mucking around in their gardens but that stopped around the start of June. We had the first official heat wave at the end of April and no rain since mid May. There was no spring. It just went from winter to high summer. Not a good idea to comment to others that its a nice day as one is likely to have one's head ripped off. A lot of short tempers at the moment.
 
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#65
Looked out the window this morning to check the weather; scorchio, well no change there. Brown is obviously the new green. Getting enough feed tfor the animals is going to be expensive this winter. Used to hear the neighbours mucking around in their gardens but that stopped around the start of June. We had the first official heat wave at the end of April and no rain since mid May. There was no spring. It just went from winter to high summer. Not a good idea to comment to others that its a nice day as one is likely to have one's head ripped off. A lot of short tempers at the moment.
Yep, it's very unlikely there will be a second hay or silage cut this year and people over here are having to feed this year's hay already.
 
#66
Emergency funding for private water supply
They have announced extra funding to help those on Private water supplies, whether that be running pipes from nearest water main, drilling deeper bore holes or even just supply of bottled water
Interesting, now if only Nicola could convince Justin to do the same thing here it might help, I left Scotland decades ago so I likely don’t qualify for funding....
 
#67
Yep, it's very unlikely there will be a second hay or silage cut this year and people over here are having to feed this year's hay already.
We had enough left over from last year but have only had one cut this year so far. Its not going to be enough. The fields were planted with special grasses for feed and now the weeds are starting to take over in parts. Generally not good although for anybody with crops of one sort or another there is never good weather.
 
#68
Yep, it's very unlikely there will be a second hay or silage cut this year and people over here are having to feed this year's hay already.
The field corn is in sad shape being stunted height and much has already gone to tassel, so a lot of it will likely be used as silage with low nutrient content. The wheat coming off now is extremely poor quality and there have been field fires started by combines harvesting and then by the balers gathering up the wheat straw. First cut hay was magnificent actually, second is looking doubtful.
 
#69
Lucky you, I was kept busy beating out fires on railway embankments in South London due to 'careless disposal of cigarette ends'.
.......and I was in the Stubia alps out of solden, in Austria, freezing my nuts off at 10,000feet plus with some lads from HQ berlin. looking down through the crystal clear air, with binos, the local totty were bronzing in the valley below us, ahead of us was a sheer wall of ice, the knob end of a small glacier, skirting around this we climbed to the summit, at 13,000 feet, and down the other side into Italy, and in blazing sunshine, emerged at the top of a ski lift, much to the astonishment of the skiers, god knows what we must have looked like, all kitted out in full climbing gear, ropes, crampons, the whole works. We rested and about turned and headed back down into solden. Many years later I found out that the glacier and snow fields that we traversed, was where the 5000 year old ice man was discovered, perfectly preserved in the ice in 1991.
 
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#70
The field corn is in sad shape being stunted height and much has already gone to tassel, so a lot of it will likely be used as silage with low nutrient content. The wheat coming off now is extremely poor quality and there have been field fires started by combines harvesting and then by the balers gathering up the wheat straw. First cut hay was magnificent actually, second is looking doubtful.
Yep, this year's hay is lovely although the hay fields haven't grown back. There have been field fires here too, a couple before they were cut and most probably started by people chucking glass bottles or fag ends from the road. I can't ever remember straw being baled in the first week of July before.

We haven't got any maize round here this year, which is unusual, but probably just as well as things have turned out.
 
#71
We had enough left over from last year but have only had one cut this year so far. Its not going to be enough. The fields were planted with special grasses for feed and now the weeds are starting to take over in parts. Generally not good although for anybody with crops of one sort or another there is never good weather.
Even the docks and nettles are rather sad here, but the ragwort is still flourishing and damn difficult to dig up the fields are now like concrete.
 
#72
Yep, this year's hay is lovely although the hay fields haven't grown back. There have been field fires here too, a couple before they were cut and most probably started by people chucking glass bottles or fag ends from the road. I can't ever remember straw being baled in the first week of July before.

We haven't got any maize round here this year, which is unusual, but probably just as well as things have turned out.
The sweet corn I’m growing (say maize here, people think you are from Quebec) is a good stand with a deep green colour, but only waist height so yield will be low. My potato crop will be dismal with an infestation of beatles and lack of precipitation so I am contemplating just ploughing them all under and calling it a day this year.
 
#73
I'm a tad disappointed. An ARRSE thread that started off so promisingly (similar theme to the 'tit Monday' thread) has evolved into a discussion about crops and the poor quality of animal feed! Can I just say ARRSE isn't as good as it used to be! :smile:
 
#74
The sweet corn I’m growing (say maize here, people think you are from Quebec) is a good stand with a deep green colour, but only waist height so yield will be low. My potato crop will be dismal with an infestation of beatles and lack of precipitation so I am contemplating just ploughing them all under and calling it a day this year.
At least you'll be able to see Isaac and Malachai coming for you. Every cloud and all that...

The potatoes here are being irrigated every other day, but we've had some stiff and hot winds so they're getting desiccated in a double whammy. They'll probably end up as pig feed.
 
#75
Even the docks and nettles are rather sad here, but the ragwort is still flourishing and damn difficult to dig up the fields are now like concrete.
Ground here has turned to sand and dust. Expect shortly to see tribes of Bedouin passing through on camels.

Oh yeh NAAFI: Bum, tits, w@nk: May I just say that this weather does present some excellent opportunities for up-cycling should one take the trouble to adjust one's wing mirror accordingly. Not that I could ever condone such a practice....ahem, cough.
 
#76
I'm just outside Calgary and it's been glorious here for the past few weeks - 28 degrees +. As we had a massive amount of snow this last winter, the grass is still green, but if the heat keeps up, it'll be turning the usual summer brown by early August.
Reading back through the post, there was mention of thunder, not wanting to inject too much drift, has anyone seen that youtube vid of lightning hitting a river?? It's truly spectacular..I'll see if I can find it (and then spend about an hour trying to put it up here - I have the IT skills of something with no IT skills)...
 
#78
Ground here has turned to sand and dust. Expect shortly to see tribes of Bedouin passing through on camels.

Oh yeh NAAFI: Bum, tits, w@nk: May I just say that this weather does present some excellent opportunities for up-cycling should one take the trouble to adjust one's wing mirror accordingly. Not that I could ever condone such a practice....ahem, cough.
We've got an inch of dust on top, which will no doubt wash off if it ever rains again.

And since it's the NAAFI, here's a lady on a bouncy tractor seat making silage.

 

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