Favourite Cold War Motors

Here's one of Stalin's little runabouts - the ZIS 115.


It certainly looks the part, but you can't help thinking that like a lot of Soviet engineering it would have been 'all fur coat and no drawers'. He probably had an entire regiment of 'Russian REME' just to keep them on the road.
 
Here's one of Stalin's little runabouts - the ZIS 115.


It certainly looks the part, but you can't help thinking that like a lot of Soviet engineering it would have been 'all fur coat and no drawers'. He probably had an entire regiment of 'Russian REME' just to keep them on the road.
it rolling like a sozzled tar at the corners... :)
 

Niamac

GCM
Much of the German autobahn system was constructed in the '30s as a Hitler vanity project. It was originally laid in short concrete sections.

During the Cold War, the DBR portion was upgraded and resurfaced, however the DDR retained its portion of the network to the original pre-war standards.

The moment you crossed th border into the East, progress became a tedious and monotonous Thump......Thump...... Thump...... Thump as the vehicle tyres passed over the endless strips.

Curiously, the Stanwell Moor Road on the western side of London Airport was laid in concrete sections and did the same thing. Maybe it still does.
The Autobahn between Bremen and Bremerhaven was still an old concrete strip job in the Sixties but over the years for some reason at the joins the supporting foundation had sunk leaving each concrete strip with a small but significant bow to it. As a result hammering along it was tricky and there was a speed when the deviation and the natural frequency of the car's suspension got into sync. It was an alarming experience and only the valiant pushed past it. A bit like breaking the sound barrier I suppose.
 
These were quite a common site in Germany during the 50s, 60s and 70s - the NSU Prinz.

Image1.jpg


They had the look of the Hillman Imp or the Simca 1000 about them. I don't know who copied whom.

Earlier models of the Prinz looked like a cross between a Trabant and those invalid cars that the Ministry of Health used to dish out. I think that they were intended for the lower end of of the market. NSU also did other higher spec cars, but I think the Prinz was probably their bread and butter.

NSU were eventually swallowed up in the Auto Union (Audi) division of VW and the name soon disappeared (hardly surprising as NSU is also a variety of STD).
 

endure

GCM
These were quite a common site in Germany during the 50s, 60s and 70s - the NSU Prinz.

View attachment 486388

They had the look of the Hillman Imp or the Simca 1000 about them. I don't know who copied whom.

Earlier models of the Prinz looked like a cross between a Trabant and those invalid cars that the Ministry of Health used to dish out. I think that they were intended for the lower end of of the market. NSU also did other higher spec cars, but I think the Prinz was probably their bread and butter.

NSU were eventually swallowed up in the Auto Union (Audi) division of VW and the name soon disappeared (hardly surprising as NSU is also a variety of STD).

My mate had a Prinz TTS. Went like shit off a shovel.


tts.jpg
 
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Lets not forget the Golf GTI the officers car of the 80s!
Of course. A subaltern of my acquaintance picked up his brand new GTI one Friday afternoon. Hammering down the autobahn to catch the evening Zeebrugge ferry, he decided to check out the function of some bit of kit under the dashboard.
When he looked up, his sight picture had changed - drastically - as, very shortly thereafter, and forever, did the shape of his hours-old new GTI.
 
Of course. A subaltern of my acquaintance picked up his brand new GTI one Friday afternoon. Hammering down the autobahn to catch the evening Zeebrugge ferry, he decided to check out the function of some bit of kit under the dashboard.
When he looked up, his sight picture had changed - drastically - as, very shortly thereafter, and forever, did the shape of his hours-old new GTI.
Whats with new fast cars and junior officers. One of my colleagues a Golf diesol driver, not the GTI was posted back to The depot as a Pl Cmdr. He had came straight off a Division Exercise on the Friday de-kitted, packed the car and shot off back to the UK for a Monday start. All went well until he reached Cumbria when it all went black, he had pilled into the back of a tractor and woke up a couple of days later in an A&E. The little red Golf was a total wreck, he also had some explanations regarding some of the training aids he had packed in his bergan in the boot
 
These were quite a common site in Germany during the 50s, 60s and 70s - the NSU Prinz.
Friend of parents back in the early 80s, who ran a caravan dealership in Sennelager, had an NSU Ro80. It was a Wankel-engined saloon that he raved about, right up until he blew an engine towing his caravan around France. After an eye-watering sum for a new engine, and warnings to run it in, he promptly thrashed it on the way home and blew out another engine...

...we drove an old Ford Cortina that just kept working :), probably because we never hung a caravan off the back of it...

 
Friend of parents back in the early 80s, who ran a caravan dealership in Sennelager, had an NSU Ro80. It was a Wankel-engined saloon that he raved about, right up until he blew an engine towing his caravan around France. After an eye-watering sum for a new engine, and warnings to run it in, he promptly thrashed it on the way home and blew out another engine...

...we drove an old Ford Cortina that just kept working :)

Wasn't their a thing in Monty Python about Wankel rotary engines!
 
I always wanted a Ford 17m Taurus (never got one)
if they were good enough for the polizei they were good enough for me.
 
Mercedes W123 and its predecessor the W114. I’m not quite old enough to have been posted to BAOR as a regular before the Wall fell, although I spent quite a bit of time there as a STAB and PO. When the opportunity came around to acquire a 280CE for pocket money, it was too hard to resist.

One of these:



But this lovely shade of green :)



A 1978 model, it had matching green velour upholstery, the Pillarless door seal was just as shit as the one in the photo above, the AC didn’t work and the passenger side had been repaired with crap parts that rusted.

But the M110 straight-six DOHC injected motor was a pearler, and it drove like a magic carpet.

My indoctrination to the three-pointed star. That car was one of the best I’ve ever had for its time, and from a VFM perspective, by far the best car I’ve ever had.
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
These were quite a common site in Germany during the 50s, 60s and 70s - the NSU Prinz.

View attachment 486388

Earlier models of the Prinz looked like a cross between a Trabant and those invalid cars that the Ministry of Health used to dish out. I think that they were intended for the lower end of of the market. NSU also did other higher spec cars, but I think the Prinz was probably their bread and butter.
Gen dit: late 60s Nienburg, my DKW 1000 Sonderclasse that could take class wins in local rallies and the RAF series, was off the road with a broken rear wallet. I had already paid the entry fee into a local civilian club event, a chum with a baby blue 600cc Prinz exactly, as per the photo, wanted to have a go at rallying, so nothing much to lose, we entered just to give him the experience. Strangely, it being his car he wanted to drive, the fact is he proved a safe driver with no competition flair and I demonstrated Rupert level navigation skills in the unaccustomed seat.

The local club was a serious outfit, Porsche 911s, 912s, BMW 2002Ti's and Alfas headed the field. Despite extensive last minute modifications to the Prinz in the form of a spotlight borrowed off the DKW , taped up with black nasty and hand mounted to illuminate signs etc. the other competitors didn't seem to grasp the threat level of our fully flared in BFG plates.

A night rally on tarmac and woodland tracks, we trundled through the early sections at speeds that sometimes even rustled the leaves a leaf in the wind of our passage, losing time on every section. By the halfway point we were so far behind time that cutting out the rest of the sections and making straight for the finish in the thickening fog to at least get a finish seemed the only course. Indeed the sections were closing and the finish was all but deserted with just a couple of lonely marshals waiting to close up and go home.

Fast forward about two months and I pulled up in my DKW on the forecourt of the BMW dealer, home of the motor club, on a none related matter, to be surrounded by clamouring locals. Gradually it came out - the final control was deserted, but for lonely marshals, because the real competitors had pushed on hard into the later stages through swiftly thickening fog which rapidly became impenetrable and they all ran out of time, classified non-finished.

Which gifted the little 600cc 2 cyl Prinz third overall and Nick S, wherever he may be, a triumphant single event rally career!
(out of three finishers)
 
One of these was pure fun.
Kadett C.jpg

Opel Kadett C GT/E 2.0E Rally
 
What, no MantaFahrer? (I'm waiting for the Lancia Delta to make an appearance)
The Manta's that I would have liked to drive, Manta I200, Manta I400 or the I2800 were not available or not affordable at that time.
A Manta is no disgrace, I come from Hesse which indeed was Opel country and the father of my best friend worked for Opel in the development center in Rüsselsheim.
So I had enough wearing parts like fenders, doors or the roof that I really, really needed and they were free or extremely cheap.
 

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