Fat cats

#1
From Times 23 Feb this year.
Defence chief to be rewarded on results in new pay system
By Jill Sherman, Michael Evans and Tony Halpin
The move is part of the trend in the public sector to determine income according to performance
BRITAIN’S top military commander is to be paid according to performance for the first time, in the Government’s latest drive to extend merit pay across the public sector.

General Sir Michael Walker, Chief of the Defence Staff, is to be awarded a salary this year that, depending on his personal achievement, will range from £193,327 to £205,160. This will rise to a maximum of £214,409 by 2007.

The move, announced by the Senior Salaries Review Body yesterday, coincided with new performance-related payments for teachers and extended bonuses for civil servants from this April.

Pay rises for MPs, ministers, doctors, teachers and judges, also disclosed yesterday, will go up by between 2.5 and 3.2 per cent. The Prime Minister’s salary will go up by 2.8 per cent, or £5,010, to £189,932.

But senior civil servants, who can now earn a maximum of £264,250, will get an average pay rise of 4.2 per cent — more than twice the level of inflation.

All 3,800 senior civil servants will be given individual pay rises based on performance of between zero and 9 per cent. In addition they are entitled to bonuses, also based on performance, of up to 20 per cent. It emerged yesterday that more than half of all senior civil servants won bonuses last year averaging £4,960, with one gaining as much as £28,438.

But senior civil servants fear that their pay rises will do little to compensate for planned cutbacks in pensions. Yesterday the First Division Assocation, which represents senior civil servants, announced that it was holding a strike ballot involving 10,000 senior officials and professionals over the proposed changes. If the strike is supported it will be the first by senior civil servants since 1984 and will coincide with a planned walkout by five public- sector unions on March 23 over pension curbs.

The new pay scheme for General Walker, the Government’s principal military adviser, will bring him into line with the 122 other top commanders and the rest of the Armed Forces who have been on performance- related pay since 2002.

Geoff Hoon, the Defence Secretary, will select his salary scale, basing it on General Walker’s “personal commitment”, as well as his military effectiveness and professionalism. General Walker’s salary will be broadly linked with that of the Cabinet Secretary and the Lord Chief Justice.

Four-star commanders (full generals, admirals and air chief marshals), currently on a maximum salary of £142,205, will see their annual pay rise to £145,831 on April 1 and to £155,185 by 2007.

In a separate report by the Armed Forces Pay Review Body, officers of brigadier rank and below, as well as all other ranks, will receive a basic salary rise of 3 per cent across the board. In addition, there will be increased allowances for specialists and “high-altitude parachute pay” for members of the Pathfinder Platoon, which scouts out enemy positions and earmarks landing zones.

The School Teachers’ Review Body also recommended a new system of payments to reflect performance in schools, as it confirmed a 2.5 per cent pay increase for teachers in April as part of a 2½ year pay deal last year.

Teachers who take on administrative duties currently earn one of five management allowances, which boost annual salaries by between £1,638 and £10,757. These will be replaced by “teaching and learning responsibility payments” set at two levels from January 2006. Level one will range from £2,250 to £5,500; level two will be worth between £6,500 and £11,000.

Schools must review their staffing structures before December and assign payments under the new system to teachers who have “a significant, specified responsibility focused on teaching and learning”.

Most doctors are already locked into a three-year pay deal, averaging about 3 per cent this year. So the settlement covers only a minority of doctors: consultants who chose to stay on the old contracts and doctors and dentists in training (who both get 3 per cent); career-grade doctors (3.2 per cent); and dentists (3.4 per cent).

Ministers’ and MPs’ salaries, which are linked to Civil Service median salaries, go up by 2.8 per cent this April with Cabinet ministers’ pay rising to £133,997 and a basic MP’s salary increasing to £59,095.

The salary for a permanent secretary will now start at £130,350 and rise to £264,250, excluding bonus payments, this April. Their salaries will rise by between 2.5 and 7.5 per cent depending on performance but they can earn bonuses of up to 10.5 per cent only. Sir Andrew Turnbull, the Cabinet Secretary, earns £216,000, excluding bonus pay.

Prison staff have been awarded rises of between 2.5 and 6 per cent but the Home Office is also undertaking talks on modernisation of the prison staff pay structure.
 
#2
Ministers’ and MPs’ salaries, which are linked to Civil Service median salaries, go up by 2.8 per cent this April with Cabinet ministers’ pay rising to £133,997 and a basic MP’s salary increasing to £59,095.
Hmmm Not sure how exactly MPs salaries are linked to the Civil Service median - unless they multiply it by 4. (and x9 for Cabinet)

In the 70's an MP was paid the same as an Executive Officer, I believe.

I think an EO (or equivalent) now gets around £15k

Funny how the MPs all want to get rid of Civil Servants to drive down cost.. I don't remember any plans to downsize the House of Laughter though?

Sticky
 
#3
yeah - I've never heard of a poor ex-MP. They can also retire when they choose to - or take an LE commission in the House of Lords.

Thieving scum. I thought they were supposed to represent the will of the people - i.e. their respective constituents - but they're more likely to feather their nests withg taxpayers money, followed by lucrative (dodgy) contracts.
 
#4
PoisonDwarf said:
Thieving scum. I thought they were supposed to represent the will of the people - i.e. their respective constituents - but they're more likely to feather their nests withg taxpayers money, followed by lucrative (dodgy) contracts.
Ah, but you're interpreting the 'representative' element as a delegate role. I think you'll find that that the majority of MPs across the parties feel that they are representatives of their constituents in a "mother knows best" capacity... :roll: :evil:
 
#5
overpaid and under-educated... most of the decisions that they make are to beniffit them and not the parish...

scrap it all and start again..
 

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