Fastest Private to WO2?

I can tell you who it wasn't. Eh, @meerkatz ?
 
Wartime can very much accelerate promotion. At least it did here in the US.

During WW I my great-aunt Kate had been a schoolteacher but when the US Navy began accepting women she joined up as a Yeoman (F) often called a Yeomanette. In three years she went up to Chief Petty Officer. She was a clerk and the secretary to the Commandant - 1st Naval District in Boston. Apparently the Admiral wanted his clerk to outrank all the other clerks in the Boston Navy Yard.

Back in the 60's when I was a ROTC cadet at university one of the instructors was Master Sergeant Blinebuty. A nice man and patient with backward cadets. He had joined the US Army in 1939, before the US was in the war. He was promoted up the MSGT and then commissioned with a hostilities only commission. By the time he dropped into St Mere Eglise on June 5th 1944 he was a Captain in an airborne unit. When the war was over he had the option of leaving active duty and going into the reserves as a Captain or returning to active duty as a Master Sergeant and eventually, upon retirement, revert to Captain with that rank for his pension.
He must have been a very patient man to put up with me as a student.
 
Wartime can very much accelerate promotion. At least it did here in the US.

During WW I my great-aunt Kate had been a schoolteacher but when the US Navy began accepting women she joined up as a Yeoman (F) often called a Yeomanette. In three years she went up to Chief Petty Officer. She was a clerk and the secretary to the Commandant - 1st Naval District in Boston. Apparently the Admiral wanted his clerk to outrank all the other clerks in the Boston Navy Yard.

Back in the 60's when I was a ROTC cadet at university one of the instructors was Master Sergeant Blinebuty. A nice man and patient with backward cadets. He had joined the US Army in 1939, before the US was in the war. He was promoted up the MSGT and then commissioned with a hostilities only commission. By the time he dropped into St Mere Eglise on June 5th 1944 he was a Captain in an airborne unit. When the war was over he had the option of leaving active duty and going into the reserves as a Captain or returning to active duty as a Master Sergeant and eventually, upon retirement, revert to Captain with that rank for his pension.
He must have been a very patient man to put up with me as a student.
I've heard of that before with the Americans. Wasn't the Irish Sergeant Major in one of the John Wayne Cavalry films, a former major with the MoH? Couldn't imagine that happening with the Brits.
 
I've heard of that before with the Americans. Wasn't the Irish Sergeant Major in one of the John Wayne Cavalry films, a former major with the MoH? Couldn't imagine that happening with the Brits.
Do you mean that professional Oirishman Victor Andrew de Bier Everleigh McLaglen (10 December 1886 – 7 November 1959)?

His antecedents were Scottish (his father later became an Episcopalian Bishop) and Victor was actually born in Stepney, London.

He joined the Life Guards under age with a view to serving in the Boer War but was retained at Windsor Castle until discharged once his true age was discovered.

On the outbreak of WWI, he joined the 10th Bn Middlesex Regt and, as a T/Capt, served as Assistant Provost Marshal in Iraq.

By the time WWI medals were available for issue, he had begun to establish his acting career. As those who had held a WWI commission had to apply for their medals, McLaglen's WWII Medal Index Card carries an interesting 'home' address for medal issue:

McLaglen.JPG


As to being an MoH winner? Only in a film, I'm afraid.
 
I've heard of that before with the Americans. Wasn't the Irish Sergeant Major in one of the John Wayne Cavalry films, a former major with the MoH? Couldn't imagine that happening with the Brits.
Victor McLaghlan.
 
Mention made above of Gibson, aged 24 when he led Op Chastise, but the record for the RAF was Paddy Finucane. Pilot Officer in August 1939, Flying Officer in September 1940, Flight Lieutenant in April 1941. Then almost immediately becomes effective squadron commander of 452 Sqn after, ermm, making his boss crash and injure himself, having chewed his tail up with the propeller during formation flying practice. Actually promoted to Squadron Leader in January 1942, then Wing Commander in June 1942. Killed less than three weeks later, shot down on the French coast, aged 21.
 
I did my JNCO cadre with a guy and when I bumped into him a year later he had not 1, not 2 but 3 tapes up.
He was a superlative arse kisser and great at volunteering his services to senior ranks, by way of getting Gnrs to do the leg work.
He also didn't drink so thoroughly unlikeable.
 
That makes him a true born cockney, born within the sound of bow bells.
True, however I've forgiven him for that as he was a superlative character actor.
I did my JNCO cadre with a guy and when I bumped into him a year later he had not 1, not 2 but 3 tapes up.
He was a superlative arse kisser and great at volunteering his services to senior ranks, by way of getting Gnrs to do the leg work.
He also didn't drink so thoroughly unlikeable.
Late 90s/early 00s there was a 1RTR WO2 who was (I believe) 28 on promotion.

He was a bit of a tit also.
 
I've heard of that before with the Americans. Wasn't the Irish Sergeant Major in one of the John Wayne Cavalry films, a former major with the MoH? Couldn't imagine that happening with the Brits.
You may be thinking of Peter Ortiz. He was in some John Ford movies. He served in the USMC, and was an OSS agent in WW2. 2 Navy Crosses. OBE, and a load of French bling. Sounded like an interesting chap.
 
Presumably Enoch Powell was a WO2 at one point.

He joined the fledgling Intelligence Corps in 1940 as a private, and at demob 1946 was a Brigadier.

Asked once which promotion was the hardest and most cherished, he said it was his first to LCpl.

Very true that
 
Slightly more amusingly- I wonder what the record is for going the other way? WO2 to Pte.....
 
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The reference is made to a character in the film, a Sergeant who had served in the Confederate Army as a Major, rather than one of the actors.
It is, my previous post might have been a tad ambiguous,
 
In the film Fort Apache (1948 ), Ward Bond plays Sergeant Major O'Rourke, who won the MOH in the Civil War while a Major. His MOH allowed his son, Lieutenant O'Rourke (John Agar), to go to West Point.

Henry Fonda's character is a Lieutenant Colonel who was a General in the War.

Fort Apache was the one film of John Ford's Cavalry Trilogy that didn't have Ben Johnson in it. In She Wore a Yellow Ribbon it's revealed that Sergeant Tyree (Johnson) was a Captain for the Confederacy. One of the privates in the regiment, after being killed, is honoured as a former Confederate General, and Tyree had served on his staff.

Cheers,
Dan.

John Ford and the cast of Fort Apache.

 

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