Fastest ever tab/yomp time in MPH ? list yours!

#1
I was just wondering what the fastest ever tab/yomp on recorded MPH was.

What are the PARA and Marine records for it, (i gather paddy doyle is no longer the record holder?)
 
#2
and Is 8 mph a fast tab?
 
#3
Eight miles in under two hours, cross country round the back of Vimy Barracks back in 92. In the middle of a fucking blizzard and trudging through two feet of snow.

Tam
 
#4
fishfinger said:
I was just wondering what the fastest ever tab/yomp on recorded MPH was.

What are the PARA and Marine records for it, (i gather paddy doyle is no longer the record holder?)

and Is 8 mph a fast tab?
Can you define 'tab' and 'yomp'?
 
#8
The fastest TAB I ever did was a mile in 2 minutes up Queen's Avenue, carrying a Burton's tailor's dummy whilst a fat youth trailed far behind shouting 'Come back you thieving bastard'

The second fastest was a Regal King Size in under 15 seconds whilst waiting to be sentenced.
 
#9
8 miles in 1hr 12 mins, followed by a brecon 2 miler 14 min 15 secs, needles to say our pti (who shall remain nameles) was a sadistic soab who later went on to join the maniacs from brecon, that was in my younger days now i can do 8 miles in 8 mins, the wonders of vehicular technology lol
 
#10
45 miles, umpteen thousand feet of vertical, 65lbs, 14 1/2 hours (on a double bag ration)

Not me, of course, but some hunky Royal Marine chappy way up ahead.... must have smelled the barn.
 
#11
Eight miles in under two hours, cross country round the back of Vimy Barracks back in 92. In the middle of a fucking blizzard and trudging through two feet of snow.

Tam
Was that before or after you had to walk to school as well. ;-)
 
#13
#14
How about fastest time in full EOD kit?

EOD Marine breaks bomb suit run world record



9/8/2009 By Cpl. Ryan Young , 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (Fwd)

SAHL SINJAR, Iraq — The morning sky over Sahl Sinjar, Iraq, is barely lit by the sun, which has not yet broken past the horizon as most Marines throughout the forward operating base are getting their final moments of sleep. Meanwhile, a Marine explosive ordnance disposal technician sits on the back steps of a mine resistant ambush protected vehicle parked in the sand near a desolate stretch of road aboard the base. The road will soon be used by various convoys of vehicles moving troops and equipment as the day goes on, but first the Marine gets suited up in an EOD bomb suit and the stretch of road will be the scene of a new world record. Staff Sgt. Jeremy Herbert, the explosive ordnance technician team leader for Marine Wing Support Squadron 271, Sahl Sinjar detachment, surpassed the previous world record time for a one-mile run in a bomb suit aboard Sahl Sinjar Sept. 1, 2009, to raise awareness for the EOD Memorial Foundation and fallen service members.
“Since I have been an EOD technician, 10 EOD techs that I have personally known, either through training or working with them, have died trying to render safe explosive hazards,” said Herbert. “I think this was a good way to honor them and honor their memory … by doing something challenging that requires hard work and dedication to accomplish.”
Herbert first heard of the EOD bomb suit world record run in February when Navy Lt. Jonathon Kehoe set the original record at 10:13 for the same cause while serving in Iraq. Herbert said he decided to take on the challenge as soon as he read about the world record. He began training for the run when he arrived aboard Sahl Sinjar in April. The record didn’t sound hard to Herbert at first, that is until his first attempt clocked in at 14 minutes.
“That was when I realized how much work and dedication I was going to have to put into it,” explained Herbert.
To train for the one-mile bomb suit run, Herbert did some sort of physical activity twice a day. He practiced running in the bomb suit a couple times throughout the week. His fellow EOD technicians trained with him as often as they could to keep him motivated.
“Our normal training in the suit is just simple tasks and movements like picking things up and walking around, so being able to run a mile in it is phenomenal,” said Sgt. James Chintala, an EOD technician with MWSS-271, Sahl Sinjar Det., who trained with Herbert since June.
Chintala said Marines and sailors aboard the base began to take notice of the training and would often ask about Herbert’s progress or show up to the bomb suit practice runs to run alongside him for support.
“I was the guy running it, but I couldn’t have done it without the Marines and sailors who helped motivate me and trained alongside me,” said Herbert.
Herbert crossed the finish line in the nearly 80 pound bomb suit and helmet at a world record time of 9:58.8, surpassing the previous record by approximately 15 seconds – taking the weight of the challenge off his shoulders.
“We didn’t all contribute to this to say ‘hey, we beat the other guy’s time,’ it was to raise the bar and gain that much more recognition for the EOD memorial,” explained Chintala.
Herbert said that a lot of relief came after he finished the race. A group of fellow service members crowded at the finish line and congratulated his accomplishment. He took in deep breaths and focused on the true reason for why he was doing this – the EOD Memorial Foundation.
Herbert is now working to be the first person to do the one-mile bomb suit run for official record with the Guinness Book of World Records.
The EOD Memorial is located aboard Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.
 
#15
From JJH:
"Was that before or after you had to walk to school as well. ;-)"

Nope, I will bite though. It was as part of my so-called trained soldier week run from 8 Signal Regiment in Vimy Barracks - (or Cockroach Central as I call it). I think it was called the ICFT at the time, and as I said, it was in the middle of a blizzard. The DS kept us waiting about three hours deciding whether or not to go ahead with the thing as the weather was so shitty, and had sent out a Land Rover over the route to check it out, which promptly got bogged down. We got turfed out anyway, needless to say.
Coldest I have ever been this side of Redford Cavalry Barracks.

Tam
 
#16
From JJH:
"Was that before or after you had to walk to school as well. ;-)"

Nope, I will bite though. It was as part of my so-called trained soldier week run from 8 Signal Regiment in Vimy Barracks - (or Cockroach Central as I call it). I think it was called the ICFT at the time, and as I said, it was in the middle of a blizzard. The DS kept us waiting about three hours deciding whether or not to go ahead with the thing as the weather was so shitty, and had sent out a Land Rover over the route to check it out, which promptly got bogged down. We got turfed out anyway, needless to say.
Coldest I have ever been this side of Redford Cavalry Barracks.

Tam
Just kiddin with ya Tam. Sounds pretty darn cold. I won't go into my tale of woe in Norway.
 
#17
Minus twenty degrees celsius, at least. Gusting winds and nasty nasty clouds as well. Brr.

Tam
 
#18
Minus twenty degrees celsius, at least. Gusting winds and nasty nasty clouds as well. Brr.

Tam
I thought you said it was cold??? That is fairly balmy in my experience. ;-) Getting my goretex and mittens.....
 
#19
Hehehe. Minus 20 is cold enough, and that is before Odin's own winds started blowing gently down my spine and o'er my unprotected head noggin. With teeth like Occam's Razor.
Brr squared. :cool:

Tam
 
#20
Hehehe. Minus 20 is cold enough, and that is before Odin's own winds started blowing gently down my spine and o'er my unprotected head noggin. With teeth like Occam's Razor.
Brr squared. :cool:

Tam
;-) Cheers
 

Latest Threads