Farage, the morons messiah....

That was then, this is now. Labour supporters used to think Blair was a top bloke. History is littered with has been populist flankers who at the time sounded correct.
How can you say that in a thread discussing the Blessed Nige, a populist flank has-been who at the time...
Oh, ISWYDT.
 

45x45

On ROPS
On ROPs
How can you say that in a thread discussing the Blessed Nige, a populist flank has-been who at the time...
Oh, ISWYDT.
It's a strange situation where people think that NF can come back and change things, Johnson adopted most of the policies he spoke about that appealed to those who are moderately right of centre, I am not convinced he has anything to bring to the party, or has an answer to solving the channel crossing issues.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
It's a strange situation where people think that NF can come back and change things, Johnson adopted most of the policies he spoke about that appealed to those who are moderately right of centre, I am not convinced he has anything to bring to the party, or has an answer to solving the channel crossing issues.
Farage is a disruptor par excellence, and IMHO whilst he can have nothing like the effect he had on the Brexit debate in relation to the updated OP SEALION, the Government is rightly cautious of his intervention. Everyone knows who Nigel is; he's like marmite on steroids with very few people ambivalent about him. Not only that, he's entertaining and he cuts through the media apathy meaning that regardless of what they think of him the public will pay attention when he's quoted (if only to disagree). Exactly the sort of campaigner the Government doesn't want illuminating an intractable and possibly insoluble issue where the status quo is not only the only realistic short term option, it's also the worst optic with the electorate.

IMHO Farage can't "come back and change things", but he may well be able to shine enough light to force the Government to "do something".
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Farage is a disruptor par excellence, and IMHO whilst he can have nothing like the effect he had on the Brexit debate in relation to the updated OP SEALION, the Government is rightly cautious of his intervention. Everyone knows who Nigel is; he's like marmite on steroids with very few people ambivalent about him. Not only that, he's entertaining and he cuts through the media apathy meaning that regardless of what they think of him the public will pay attention when he's quoted (if only to disagree). Exactly the sort of campaigner the Government doesn't want illuminating an intractable and possibly insoluble issue where the status quo is not only the only realistic short term option, it's also the worst optic with the electorate.

IMHO Farage can't "come back and change things", but he may well be able to shine enough light to force the Government to "do something".
Yes, he's a right laugh.
 
Yes, he's a right laugh.
It does make me laugh that he's done quite well in his life and was a leading figure in getting brexit.
Unlike some other doddering old twats who never really moved on from the safety blanket of the army.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Yes, he's a right laugh.
Your antipathy for the failed Parliamentary candidate for Thanet is noted. As is the fact you couldn't resist saying something about him, which rather proves my point.
 
It does make me laugh that he's done quite well in his life and was a leading figure in getting brexit.
Unlike some other doddering old twats who never really moved on from the safety blanket of the army.

It's not like they didn't need to winkle you out of your stores with a spoon and hammer your knuckles off the door frames on the way out...
 
It's not like they didn't need to winkle you out of your stores with a spoon and hammer your knuckles off the door frames on the way out...

That right they didn't. Some of us can manage civvie street.
 
Farage is a disruptor par excellence, and IMHO whilst he can have nothing like the effect he had on the Brexit debate in relation to the updated OP SEALION, the Government is rightly cautious of his intervention. Everyone knows who Nigel is; he's like marmite on steroids with very few people ambivalent about him. Not only that, he's entertaining and he cuts through the media apathy meaning that regardless of what they think of him the public will pay attention when he's quoted (if only to disagree). Exactly the sort of campaigner the Government doesn't want illuminating an intractable and possibly insoluble issue where the status quo is not only the only realistic short term option, it's also the worst optic with the electorate.

IMHO Farage can't "come back and change things", but he may well be able to shine enough light to force the Government to "do something".
The power of telling the truth is enormously disruptive to those in power. The reason is the most dangerous idea to the powerful, is the public having alternative choices and you can always tell an initiative derives from the powerful by the lack of choice and how its cast in the language of 'something must be done' or in the case of migration 'nothing can be done'.
 

robotnik

Old-Salt
The thing is, if Nigel had stood as a parliementary candidate for the Conservatives he would have been an MP for the last twenty years.
And the problem with that is that he wouldn't have survived two days as a Conservative MP, let alone two decades. Can you imagine him putting up with Cameron's non-exit Brexit ('Look at me, I've got a few million quid knocked off the Brussels bill, so let's forget this Brexit nonsense!')? And how would he have reacted to May's policy of kicking the Brexit can so far down the road it became invisible? Nah, if Nige had been a Tory MP he'd have been whipped into submission (unlikely) or kicked out (highly likely). Sometimes revolutions have to come from outside the system.
 
But he didn’t have to win. All he had to do was provoke.
Whenever I chat about Brexit or Farage, to me the moment Nigel became a serious threat and not just an irritant was when the British Establishment failed to give the people a referendum on the constitution and railroaded one through in the background.

After 2005, its arguably fair to say that Farage had truth on his side to a far greater extent than the establishment whose only play was to attack the man and anyone around him, or just stop talking about the subject all together.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
The thing is, if Nigel had stood as a parliementary candidate for the Conservatives he would have been an MP for the last twenty years.
The weird reality, is in that case he would have being a non-entity like the rest of them and did more for this country by losing repeated elections.
Both true.
 

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