False Memories of Fabricated Political Events

#1
Via Naked Capitalism.
[h=1]False Memories of Fabricated Political Events[/h]
[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]
[h=2]Steven J. Frenda[/h]
University of California, Irvine - Department of Psychology and Social Behavior

[h=2]Eric D. Knowles[/h]
University of California, Irvine - Department of Psychology and Social Behavior

[h=2]William Saletan[/h]
The Slate Group

[h=2]Elizabeth F. Loftus[/h]
University of California, Irvine - Department of Psychology and Social Behavior
[/FONT]
[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]January 16, 2013[/FONT]

[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 49, 2013[/FONT]
[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2013-87[/FONT]

[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]Abstract: [/FONT]
[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]In the largest false memory study to date, 5,269 participants were asked about their memories for three true and one of five fabricated political events. Each fabricated event was accompanied by a photographic image purportedly depicting that event. Approximately half the participants falsely remembered that the false event happened, with 27% remembering that they saw the events happen on the news. Political orientation appeared to influence the formation of false memories, with conservatives more likely to falsely remember seeing Barack Obama shaking hands with the president of Iran, and liberals more likely to remember George W. Bush vacationing with a baseball celebrity during the Hurricane Katrina disaster. A follow-up study supported the explanation that events are more easily implanted in memory when they are congruent with a person's preexisting attitudes and evaluations, in part because attitude-congruent false events promote feelings of recognition and familiarity, which in turn interfere with source attributions.[/FONT][FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;][/FONT]
[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]Number of Pages in PDF File: 8[/FONT]
[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]Keywords: False memory, Source monitoring, Political preference[/FONT]
[FONT=Myriad Roman, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif;]Accepted Paper Series[/FONT]
Linky.

Well that explains a lot I have so many implausible memories of political events: Gordon Brown saving the world, Nick Clegg being popular, Liam Fox being straight, Tony Blair being PM of Cool Britannia rather than a dodgy spiv with the moral compass of a syphilitic hyena.

Obviously Photo Shopped:
 
#5
"Reid committed 3,300 troops to Helmand province, Aghanistan in January 2006. As Secretary of State he failed to question the assumptions made by the British chiefs and made a significant error of judgement when he said troops would leave "without a single shot being fired." By 2008, 4 million bullets had been fired by the British armed forces"


Wiki.
 
#9
"Reid committed 3,300 troops to Helmand province, Aghanistan in January 2006. As Secretary of State he failed to question the assumptions made by the British chiefs and made a significant error of judgement when he said troops would leave "without a single shot being fired." By 2008, 4 million bullets had been fired by the British armed forces"


Wiki.
Wiki's wrong. He said he would be happy if we got out without having fired a shot, not that we would.
 
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