Falklands War - The Untold Story

jaffa76

Swinger
Archibald said:
The Commander Land Forces JJ Moore came in for a bit of stick from Rose

Archie

The reasons why Rose was quite keen to get in a few jibes might be explained by the 'lessons learned' sections of 'Exocet Falklands: The Untold Story of Special Forces Operations by Ewen Southby-Tailyour. Screenshots of relevant parts below

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Yokel

LE
I am still wondering if the talk by Tim Gedge is on YouTube or anything. This weekend I will try to try find that magazine special from 2001 in which he wrote an article on flying the Sea Harrier. Meanwhile, this short video shows that after a background flying the Sea Vixen and the Phantom he converted to Sea Harrier and was the first CO 800 NAS. A natural choice for a new squadron!

 

rmn

LE
I am still wondering if the talk by Tim Gedge is on YouTube or anything. This weekend I will try to try find that magazine special from 2001 in which he wrote an article on flying the Sea Harrier. Meanwhile, this short video shows that after a background flying the Sea Vixen and the Phantom he converted to Sea Harrier and was the first CO 800 NAS. A natural choice for a new squadron!


Hi, apologies for not responding earlier. I don't think the talk was recorded though there was a chap from FITV ( Falkland islands Television) there. Thanks for posting the clip about his Sea Vixen / Phantom days. It felt quite odd at the talk as most present were probably late 60's + yet were talking about a time I could recall. Also there were Roger ((ex-RN aircrew) and Norma (Falkland Islander and mother of current Chief Medical Officer) Edwards, and others from 1982.
 

Yokel

LE
I am bemused by the headline 'UK's Aggression' on the same page as a story about India's own territorial disputes.

It does remind us that on this day in 1982, the landings were taking place in San Carlos - which would lead the land campaign and those hectic days marked the move from establishing sea and air control to defeating the Argentines on land and liberating our people. It was also the start of the Battle of Bomb Alley - between the warships and aircraft of the Royal Navy and the aircraft of the Argentine Air Force and Navy.

None of the vessels carrying troops got hit. We won, but not without real cost.
 
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Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
I am bemused by the headline 'UK's Aggression' on the same page as a story about India's own territorial disputes.

It does remind us that on this day in 1982, the landings were taking place in San Carlos - which would lead the land campaign and those hectic days marked the move from establishing sea and air control to defeating the Argentines on land and liberating our people. It was also the start of the Battle of Bomb Alley - between the warships and aircraft of the Royal Navy and the aircraft of the Argentine Air Force and Navy.

None of the vessels carry troops got hit. We won, but not without real cost.

RN did take casualties. Lifted from social media
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Morning All,
Forty years ago, from today's local 'comic'.
View attachment 664477
Gherao, meaning "encirclement", is a word which denotes a tactic used by labour activists and union leaders in India; it is similar to picketing. Usually, a group of people would surround a politician or a government building until their demands are met, or answers given.
 

Yokel

LE
Here is a Forces TV video about the landings on 21 May 1982 and the planning for them.



The interviewed parties include (then) Brigadier Julian Thompson RM, commander of Three Commando Brigade, Commodore Mike Clapp RN, Commodore Amphibious Task Group, and Major Ewen Southerby Taylor, who I think was in command of the landing craft squadron aboard HMS Fearless. The preparatory attack against the Argentine position at Fanning Head by the SBS and HMS Antrim gets a mention.

Woodward devotes a chapter of One Hundred Days to the events of this day. He notes that the success pf the landings lies largely in the hands of the COs and ships' companies of the frigates and destroyers, and the Sea Harrier pilots. Not only did he bring the carriers close to the islands to maximise their time on CAP, but he also detached both of his Type 22 frigates, Broadsword and Brilliant, to defend the landing force.

Yet some, like that ******** Max Hastings, accused him of personal cowardice for not bring the carriers closer to land earlier in the campaign. As Woodward himself explained, it was his job to establish sea and and air control to an extent that a landing could be conducted, to inflict attrition upon Argentine forces, and to conserve his fighting force until it was needed for the battle that would occur at the time of the landings. He achieved all those things.

@Fang_Farrier - I remember sitting in a room doing some damage control training, with a veteran of HMS Ardent (an NBCD Instructor) giving the training. Reading the shite some twat at HQ expected him to read out was enough to trigger unhappy memories and he started hyperventilating and had to leave the room. This was more than twenty five years after the conflict.
 
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this chap is actually quite good, worth a perusal if you into art

 

Yokel

LE
This video is from the Royal Navy's YouTube channel. It is the recollections of Cdr Ken Enticknap (then CPO) about the experience of HMS Ardent and being attacked by Argentine Air Force and Argentine Navy aircraft. Without the actions of Ardent and the other escorts the ships carrying the troops would have got it.



I felt a bit emotional at times watching that, particularly when he mentions second guessing himself and feeling guilt at surviving. I am thinking of my former Chief, instructor, and friend that I mentioned above.
 
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Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Morning All,
Forty years ago, from today's local 'comic'.
View attachment 664967

From the BFSAI social media yesterday.
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Today BFSAI remembers those crew aboard HMS Ardent and HMS Antelope, who forty years ago, lost their lives in the Falkland Islands conflict. Our thoughts are very much with their families at this time of remembrance. To mark this, the 40th anniversary, crew from HMS Forth held a memorial at sea for all those who were lost. We will remember them.
 

Yokel

LE
In 1992, the BBC commissioned a series of programmes to mark the tenth anniversary of the conflict - entitled War Stories. The first was by Captain Nick Barker, CO of HMS Endurance in 1981/1982. He discussed the politics of the Nott cuts and his overlooking strategic arguments, and the way that intelligence was ignored in early 1981, He then discusses the capture and recapture of South Georgia, and then talks about the Falklands themselves and how it had an impact of islanders' lives, before hearing a story of 3 Para's hard fight for Mount London.

For years I have tried to find it on YouTube, but with no success. Today I found it on the YouTube channel of Harry Barker - Captain Barker's son?



A story of arrogance, an obsession with secrecy, and a refusal to admit mistakes...
 

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